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Old 03-30-2012, 07:27 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Verseau View Post
Many towns in Aroostook County in northern Maine near the Canadian border. Most people are bilingual in French and English and will often code-switch.
^^ This right here! I have heard single sentences that switched 2 or 3 times depending on what language had the word that best fit. After living there for 20 years it becomes second nature to hear it and it stops being strange. After a while you don't even notice it because you pick up on the "Valley" French and know what is being said.
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Old 03-31-2012, 04:43 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL SouthWest Suburbs
3,528 posts, read 5,160,886 times
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Never heard of CODE SWITCHING.

Interesting because I sure have noticed code switching.

Then again I also notice the non english speakers talk LOUD when they are in public.

The funny aspect is the same group likes to tune out of an english conversation when its a subject they do not like....

Funny how when its a subject they do like how well they know the english language.

After I tell the spanish speaking people I know spanish they do little code switching unless they are actually talking with someone who really does not understand english.
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Old 03-31-2012, 04:48 AM
 
Location: Washington, DC NoVA
1,105 posts, read 1,947,089 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Code switching is the use of two languages simultaneously by people who speak both languages,and switch from one language to the other in conversation, sometimes mid-sentence.

It is quite common in south Texas, among people over about 50 or 60, because here, Anglos years ago could all speak pretty good Spanish along with English. The old men sitting on benches sit and code switch all day. Like, "Yes, but you know la clima es muy caliente a cerca la costa, not like it it is here."

I've also heard it in Canada's Ottawa Valley, where a lot of French is spoken on both sides of the river north of Ottawa.
it happens here. i noticed it in school every day, only the spanish speakers did it in school though. i never heard the asian or middle eastern kids doing it, they all just spoke arabic or urdu or korean to each other.
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Old 03-31-2012, 04:03 PM
 
159 posts, read 265,537 times
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How about code-switching in street advertisements? This is an ad for a gym in the Miami area.

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Old 03-31-2012, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Denver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hdwell View Post
I have heard it down in Louisiana in Cajun country.
Ditto.
I'm sure its common in Florida as it is here in Texas.
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Old 03-31-2012, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,005 posts, read 54,508,374 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Code switching is the use of two languages simultaneously by people who speak both languages,and switch from one language to the other in conversation, sometimes mid-sentence.

It is quite common in south Texas, among people over about 50 or 60, because here, Anglos years ago could all speak pretty good Spanish along with English. The old men sitting on benches sit and code switch all day. Like, "Yes, but you know la clima es muy caliente a cerca la costa, not like it it is here."

I've also heard it in Canada's Ottawa Valley, where a lot of French is spoken on both sides of the river north of Ottawa.
In my office in New Jersey I hear it all the time. The speakers are New Yorkers, though.

It's very common, the switching between Spanish and English in the same conversation or even the same sentence.
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Old 03-31-2012, 11:37 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,720,777 times
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All over the NY metro area in dozens of different languages. In my house it was between Norwegian and English.

Probably the biggest languages for code switching in NYC area are Spanish, Mandarin, Russian, Yiddish, and Italian.
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