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Old 03-30-2012, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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Code switching is the use of two languages simultaneously by people who speak both languages,and switch from one language to the other in conversation, sometimes mid-sentence.

It is quite common in south Texas, among people over about 50 or 60, because here, Anglos years ago could all speak pretty good Spanish along with English. The old men sitting on benches sit and code switch all day. Like, "Yes, but you know la clima es muy caliente a cerca la costa, not like it it is here."

I've also heard it in Canada's Ottawa Valley, where a lot of French is spoken on both sides of the river north of Ottawa.
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Old 03-30-2012, 01:17 PM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
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any part of greater NY with significant numbers of ultra O jews. They will code switch between english and Yiddish (and the related "yeshivish" though arguably yeshivish is just a widespread form of code switching, like Spanglish)

Some Modern O jews (and some non o Jews who have spent much time in Israel, and of course Israelis living in the US) will code switch between English and Modern Hebrew. Again, mostly in NY, but also in places like baltimore, and I imagine LA.

My DD and her friends were into anime and had all learned some Japanese. Code switching between English and Japanese is probably not uncommon among fans of japanese pop culture - but these kids codeswitched among english, japanese AND modern Hebrew.
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Old 03-30-2012, 01:27 PM
 
Location: CT
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Anywhere in the US with a large amount of immigrants or people who are truly multilingual. I do it. Code switching can only happen if someone is fluent in all the languages they do it with. So if you took French or Chinese in school and use the words a lot that's a bit different. Like with kids who use Japanese words, that's more word borrowing than code switching unless they're truly fluent in Japanese. They can look very similar though.

So like, Tri-State Area, LA, Chicagoland, Bay Area, Boston, Miami etc, etc. and border regions like the Southwest and Northern New England and anywhere that's a major immigrant hub or a place where an ethnic group still actively learns both or more languages even without new immigrants coming in.
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Old 03-30-2012, 01:31 PM
 
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I hear it here all the time between spanish/english, greek/english and polish/english. I have a lot of polish and greek friends though who's parents are first gen.
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Old 03-30-2012, 01:32 PM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by missRoxyhart View Post
Anywhere in the US with a large amount of immigrants or people who are truly multilingual. I do it. Code switching can only happen if someone is fluent in all the languages they do it with. So if you took French or Chinese in school and use the words a lot that's a bit different. Like with kids who use Japanese words, that's more word borrowing than code switching unless they're truly fluent in Japanese. They can look very similar though.

what if they are not fluent but can manage a sentence in it? Or at least a long phrase? The kids I was referring to were not fluent in Japanese or Modern Hebrew, but what they were doing often went well beyond the occasional word.

If the ability to switch seamlessly between fluency in two different languages is code switching, than of my examples I would still stick with English/Yiddish in NYC (but almost only among hasidim and ex-hasidim) and English/Modern Hebrew (but only among Israelis and a small number of others who have spent lots of time in Israel and come at least close to fluency)
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Old 03-30-2012, 01:36 PM
 
Location: CT
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brooklynborndad View Post
what if they are not fluent but can manage a sentence in it? Or at least a long phrase? The kids I was referring to were not fluent in Japanese or Modern Hebrew, but what they were doing often went well beyond the occasional word.

If the ability to switch seamlessly between fluency in two different languages is code switching, than of my examples I would still stick with English/Yiddish in NYC (but almost only among hasidim and ex-hasidim) and English/Modern Hebrew (but only among Israelis and a small number of others who have spent lots of time in Israel and come at least close to fluency)
As far as I know the official definition is that it happens with people who are fluent in the languages they're doing it with. But yeah it does seem kind of strict at parts, there needs to be a cutoff somewhere I guess though. Bringing up New York Jews who use a lot of Yiddish but aren't fluent in it, does that bring up maybe an issue of dialect? Like Jewish/Yiddish-English? I'm actually fascinated with language.
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Old 03-30-2012, 01:47 PM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by missRoxyhart View Post
As far as I know the official definition is that it happens with people who are fluent in the languages they're doing it with. But yeah it does seem kind of strict at parts, there needs to be a cutoff somewhere I guess though. Bringing up New York Jews who use a lot of Yiddish but aren't fluent in it, does that bring up maybe an issue of dialect? Like Jewish/Yiddish-English? I'm actually fascinated with language.

It may, though the people I am referring to are fluent in Yiddish and in the right social circumstances will speak in Yiddish only. While one tends to think of divisions in immigrant societies by age, among the hasidim in NY more important is 1. division by gender - women tend to be more comfortable in English than men - and 2, occupation - a man who works in an electronics store will be more comfortable in english than one who works in a kosher restaurant or in a hasidic school. and 3 - location - hasidim who live in relatively diverse Boro Park (where they are exposed to non hasidic Orthodox jews, including sephardim) are more likely to be comfortable in English than ones who live in Williamsburg or Monroe NY (the community of Kiryas Joel) Of course the english they speak, when they are speaking english will involve both pronunciation, use of certain words, and grammatical features, that I guess would make it dialect. Interestingly I have found some of them are NOT aware of which yiddish words are normally used by "regular American Jews" - they sometimes attempt to translate a word and I have to stop them and say "don't bother, 'naches' is 'naches'" So its different than "standard American Yinglish" or whatever. Of course the Yinglish used by non hasidic ultra O (who usually are NOT fluent in Yiddish) is somewhat different, I think, than that used by (mostly elderly) non orthodox jews.

Last edited by brooklynborndad; 03-30-2012 at 02:09 PM..
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Old 03-30-2012, 04:29 PM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
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In San Diego there are plenty of neighborhoods and areas where the conversations constantly transition between English, Spanglish, Spanish, and back again.
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Old 03-30-2012, 04:32 PM
 
Location: New Hampshire
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Many towns in Aroostook County in northern Maine near the Canadian border. Most people are bilingual in French and English and will often code-switch.
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Old 03-30-2012, 07:21 PM
 
Location: USA
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I have heard it down in Louisiana in Cajun country.
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