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Old 04-01-2012, 07:03 PM
 
778 posts, read 1,410,722 times
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You're American when you consider America your home over any other country and don't feel that is a transient thing. Also, you should have some connectedness to "American values". I agree with others that being American has nothing to do with race or ethnicity. I have seen people who have never lived outside of the USA having people assume as they are foreign due to their appearance while people who look more "American" (either in looks or in their clothing) but are actually foreigners with thick accents (and not citizens of the USA) are assumed to be from here initially. I think we are a pretty open minded country though, and we are likely to include someone as being American if the person considers himself American (even if he's a new American).
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Old 04-01-2012, 11:21 PM
 
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How about you become an American when you are willing to fight for America over your heritage country? So if a war broke out between America and your heritage country, you'd fight for America...
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Old 04-01-2012, 11:37 PM
 
Location: Toronto
3,338 posts, read 5,791,699 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maast View Post
How about you become an American when you are willing to fight for America over your heritage country? So if a war broke out between America and your heritage country, you'd fight for America...
I've heard that kind of question being posed a lot.

Thing is, I bet a lot of Americans whose ancestry have been Americans for generations might still not be willing to fight in an actual war. Support, yes. But actually take part to fight, as in put in a life on the line means a lot of people would say no (if course then this depends on the situation of war -- how did the war take place and what are the justifications for that war).

But hey, I might be overthinking it. I have actually heard that question posed to recent immigrants as a quick "think on the spot" test to try and see who their "hearts belong to" as a question, but then again whatever people say.
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Old 04-01-2012, 11:56 PM
 
3,285 posts, read 5,432,089 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 55degrees View Post
You're American when you consider America your home over any other country and don't feel that is a transient thing.
Exactly.

If I move to Japan today or some other foreign nation I wouldn't consider myself to be their nationality until its my home.

To the OP; do you feel as if America is your home? If so then welcome to the club
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Old 04-02-2012, 12:18 AM
 
Location: Crowntown
210 posts, read 214,343 times
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Honestly I would not consider you an American. You are a _______/American to me and there is nothing wrong with that. You were not only not born here, but you also grew up isolated from Americans and surrounded by immigrants. This being said I don't look down on you and you being a ________/American means you are still entitled to all the same rights I as an American am. I can't call you an American without the _____/ though.

Your children though if born and raised here will be Americans without the _____/ but you won't in my mind. Honestly I wouldn't even consider your children as American as me. It's really kinda offensive to insinuate that someone who has a generation or two of American heritage is as American as someone who has a 500 hundred or 5,000 years worth of American heritage. America is not your homeland, or your children's it's my homeland.

I was born here, raised around almost only other Americans and no one I'm blood related to going back 450 years on my European and African sides and 10,000+ years on my Native American side was born outside of the US. My family was involved and experienced those things you read about in History class that happened hundreds of years ago. I can recite to you first hand accounts of ancestors and relatives memories of those times and major events in American history and how it effected our family because they were there. We have been Americans longer than 90% of the world knew about America.

I grew up eating grits and shrimp for breakfast and collard greens cornbread an chicken for dinner because that's Southern American cuisine. I grew up thinking "y'all" and "fixin" and "lolligaggin" were actual words because we have been saying that down here in my family for hundreds of years. All my uncles, aunts, grandparents, everyone in my family speaks only English in a southern accent and cooks southern food recipes that have been passed down in our family for generations. That's our culture, you grew up around your culture which is not American, I grew up around mine which is. My family traditions mirror American traditions and have for hundreds of years because I am an American.

Last edited by Razorblade; 04-02-2012 at 12:56 AM..
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Old 04-02-2012, 07:11 AM
 
456 posts, read 663,459 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BMOREBOY View Post
Exactly.

If I move to Japan today or some other foreign nation I wouldn't consider myself to be their nationality until its my home.

To the OP; do you feel as if America is your home? If so then welcome to the club
Well obviously it's my home because it's where I live and grew up, but my heart and allegiance is still with my ethnic group and heritage country.
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Old 04-02-2012, 07:19 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
1,392 posts, read 1,275,660 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stumbler. View Post
Thing is, I bet a lot of Americans whose ancestry have been Americans for generations might still not be willing to fight in an actual war. Support, yes. But actually take part to fight, as in put in a life on the line means a lot of people would say no (if course then this depends on the situation of war -- how did the war take place and what are the justifications for that war).
Not to generalize to much but haven't you just described human beings in general?
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Old 04-02-2012, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,033 posts, read 54,537,410 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maast View Post
How about you become an American when you are willing to fight for America over your heritage country? So if a war broke out between America and your heritage country, you'd fight for America...
Hmm, well, that's pretty much how the country got started...
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Old 04-02-2012, 08:58 AM
 
3,157 posts, read 8,116,063 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Razorblade View Post
It's really kinda offensive to insinuate that someone who has a generation or two of American heritage is as American as someone who has a 500 hundred or 5,000 years worth of American heritage. America is not your homeland, or your children's it's my homeland.
I don't think that's offensive. I think that's one of the best parts of America, that one's family can come here and assimilate to be fully American within a generation.
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Old 04-02-2012, 09:09 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,241,442 times
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Emma Goldman was an American. She was born in Russia, came to the US at age 16, and became an American when she tirelessly fought for the rights of people who were the victims of injustice in America. For that, she was imprisoned and deported. She was the most American of heroes, and fought to the death against the abuse of American ideals, and was called a traitor.

Emma Goldman - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A century before her time, "Her writing and lectures spanned a wide variety of issues, including prisons, atheism, freedom of speech, militarism, capitalism, marriage, free love, and homosexuality." The first time she was arrested, it was for illegally distributing information about birth control. How would we see such a person today?

Last edited by jtur88; 04-02-2012 at 09:22 AM..
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