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Old 03-31-2012, 10:13 AM
 
Location: plano
6,585 posts, read 8,118,827 times
Reputation: 5837

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lizz0rd View Post
I've had that same epiphany. Needless to say it is impossible to live that 18-25 or 18-30 whatever stretch of your life again... You look at the city with different eyes, at least if you've been out of it for awhile, and at least for me. I have some family that are life timers though, they are retired and still living in the city, but they don't have an option to move anymore either. Their SS pays a lot of the bills.


That is about how I felt, I had wanted to leave at least a year before then and planned my escape route by lining up an opportunity elsewhere.
Hit the nail on the head for me too. City dwellers (hard to say its living) give up things to get lots close by. That tradeoff doesnt work for me. I lived in the city of Houston right after college in a rural state and towns (hometown and college town). I liked it but then again Houston was new then and not run down like NYC and Pittsburgh where when I moved to next. I like being home or in my neighborhood doing things not in the city around a crowd. I lost interest in city life in Pittsburgh from working in the city not living there at the age of 27
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Old 03-31-2012, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Florida
398 posts, read 622,506 times
Reputation: 261
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnhw2 View Post
Hit the nail on the head for me too. City dwellers (hard to say its living) give up things to get lots close by. That tradeoff doesnt work for me. I lived in the city of Houston right after college in a rural state and towns (hometown and college town). I liked it but then again Houston was new then and not run down like NYC and Pittsburgh where when I moved to next. I like being home or in my neighborhood doing things not in the city around a crowd. I lost interest in city life in Pittsburgh from working in the city not living there at the age of 27
Thanks for your post. I mean, I'll definitely go check out a museum or go out for a restaurant, but I'm in and out. The rest of the lifestyle just isn't appealing. I enjoy having a nice garden now, sitting on my back deck in the morning and hearing birds, something I could never have in the city, sleep much better, etc. These are things I used to not care for, I guess my preferences just changed b/c I definitely used to be "all about it".
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Old 03-31-2012, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Seattle, Washington
3,733 posts, read 6,488,029 times
Reputation: 1989
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lizz0rd View Post
That is about how I felt, I had wanted to leave at least a year before then and planned my escape route by lining up an opportunity elsewhere.
So did you escape to a suburb, rural, or country life? Or just a smaller, not necessarily rural town?

I'm thinking a country life myself, somewhere in Central or Eastern Washington, but that is for eventually. Unfortunately right now I think I still need to be in a town or city, but it sure will be smaller than Seattle in any event, and therefore a step in the right direction.
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Old 03-31-2012, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Florida
398 posts, read 622,506 times
Reputation: 261
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjg5 View Post
So did you escape to a suburb, rural, or country life? Or just a smaller, not necessarily rural town?

I'm thinking a country life myself, somewhere in Central or Eastern Washington, but that is for eventually. Unfortunately right now I think I still need to be in a town or city, but it sure will be smaller than Seattle in any event, and therefore a step in the right direction.
Small town, but not a big "suburban" like area... Not in a suburban enclave though, but I can get to them quick, or back into San Francisco quick. I still want to be within a major metro b/c I travel pretty often and make good use of a big airport, as well as other things. If I moved somewhere truly in the middle of nowhere my travel expenses would go up too much.
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Old 04-01-2012, 12:46 AM
 
56,747 posts, read 81,061,259 times
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Keep in mind that not all urban neighborhoods are the same and you can find homes with yards within cities. These aren't necessarily expensive either. It is a matter of where you are and where a person looks within a city.
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Old 04-01-2012, 01:20 AM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,901,330 times
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I think using the term "city" is too vague. Suburbs are still cities to me.

Moving from urban areas to suburban areas though I think is still a trend in America.

Give me a college, airport, natural food markets, a book store, coffee shops, a high end dep. store like Macy's or Nordstrom's, and the Apple store and I'm fine wherever. Urban or suburban, city or suburb.
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Old 04-01-2012, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis
2,331 posts, read 3,059,308 times
Reputation: 3925
I grew up in a rural area. I moved to the city when I was 18, now I am 42 and I still couldn't imagine living anywhere else. Cities are where I belong. Suburbs and small towns are full of "normal people", I don't do well with them and don't feel comfortable in that enviornment.
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Old 04-01-2012, 11:38 AM
 
1,495 posts, read 1,949,655 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drewcifer View Post
I grew up in a rural area. I moved to the city when I was 18, now I am 42 and I still couldn't imagine living anywhere else. Cities are where I belong. Suburbs and small towns are full of "normal people", I don't do well with them and don't feel comfortable in that enviornment.
I hear you. I think this whole "getting over the city" is mostly people from the city. Whereas those of us who grew up in suburbia or the hinterlands know that the grass is not any greener out there (figuratively, that is, I'm from the desert so such analogies are confusing to me). In fact, we probably delude ourselves that city life is way better, when really it's just another variation on the same theme of trying to get by in life.

I think one of my favorite things about city life is it's ok to be in a bad mood. You know what I mean? In non-city places there's often this pressure to act like you're happy all the time, even if you're not.
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Old 04-01-2012, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,783 posts, read 13,372,272 times
Reputation: 11313
Quote:
Originally Posted by j_cat View Post
I hear you. I think this whole "getting over the city" is mostly people from the city. Whereas those of us who grew up in suburbia or the hinterlands know that the grass is not any greener out there (figuratively, that is, I'm from the desert so such analogies are confusing to me). In fact, we probably delude ourselves that city life is way better, when really it's just another variation on the same theme of trying to get by in life.

I think one of my favorite things about city life is it's ok to be in a bad mood. You know what I mean? In non-city places there's often this pressure to act like you're happy all the time, even if you're not.
Yeah, I spent much of my earlier years either in suburbs, the country, or on military bases, which are sort of a combination of the two.

After moving to a suburban part of Northern Seattle when I was 24, I can safely say that I have no interest in giving up the "city life" in the forseeable future. Someday, I very well may; when I have a family and whatnot... but even still, I'd prefer to live in a "quieter" part of a city, rather than in an outlying suburb. Commute into the city time isn't worth it, and honestly I'd rather my children have some exposure to city life and all it has to offer.

Not saying I don't like the suburbs or the country, and I've actually defended them on here from people who have that lame knee-jerk "oh god the suburbs" thing going on, because they certainly serve a purpose and people live in and enjoy them, and there certainly were things about them that were good, and that I did enjoy.
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Old 04-01-2012, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
771 posts, read 1,115,545 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lizz0rd View Post
Thanks for your post. I mean, I'll definitely go check out a museum or go out for a restaurant, but I'm in and out. The rest of the lifestyle just isn't appealing. I enjoy having a nice garden now, sitting on my back deck in the morning and hearing birds, something I could never have in the city, sleep much better, etc. These are things I used to not care for, I guess my preferences just changed b/c I definitely used to be "all about it".
I think you are over generalizing too. Here in the middle of Chicago my mom owns a house with a nice big yard, garden, patio and plenty of birds singing in the morning. It's actually relaxing. My dad also lives in the city, with a big yard, garden, pool, and tiki bar and huge patio. Plenty of birds there too. With the exception of few cities, most cities offer a variety of different experiences,

Cities are not just made up of apartment/condo buildings with no nature. I think it's a little unfair to stereotype like that. Now things like traffic is another story. But when it comes ypto having a yard and hearing the birds sing with some peace and quiet you are way off. it really depends where in the city you live. Here in Chicago as in most cities, you will find plenty of places that are quiet, have nice yards and "nature".
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