U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 04-01-2012, 03:53 PM
 
5,820 posts, read 5,194,224 times
Reputation: 17729

Advertisements

Everyone wants and needs something different out of life, and thank goodness for that!

I grew up in a university town of about 40,000, then spent from 18 - 33 living in (in order: Seattle, Milwaukee, NYC, LA, Salt Lake City (with some stops in smaller places.)

I was OVER living in cities after my LA years - boy, those were tough! I did enjoy SLC very much, but was happy to move on to smaller towns. SLC felt like a small town because of the neighborhood I lived in, but the ozone pollution was getting to me.

Now I live in a town of population 945 six months out of the year and a small city of 11,000 for the other six months. 11,000 is about as big as I want to go for the rest of my life.

In my little town, a city of 65,000 is about an hour and a half away, and the HUGE city is 3 hours away. In my bigger town, the big city is about an hour and a half drive. I only go to any of the cities maybe twice a year, and then only for a special event like a play or concert. If I need anything I can't buy locally there's always the internet. And flying in and out of a smaller airport is SO much nicer than the lines and craziness of huge airports.

I'm happy that city people love living in the city, and that us rural people love our less-crowded lives. Thank goodness that most of us can choose where we live! (Yes, I know that's a whole other arguement, but I do believe that almost everyone has a choice.)
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-01-2012, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
771 posts, read 1,115,545 times
Reputation: 438
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lizz0rd View Post
So you say that Avondale has nightlife, but nothing crazy...That is my point. I know where those neighborhoods are. And no, they aren't nightlife spots, they have a suburban character to them with lots of sfh's.
There are plenty of people in Chicago who cut through alleys walking and such and tons of balconies are alley facing.
It took me 2 seconds to find this picture. And no, Chicago has not near the amount of rats as NYC, but it certainly has them.

I know you have seen these...
Of course I am generalizing, but somewhere like Evanston or Oak Park which are suburbs have more going on than Avondale... Avondale is NOT what I'm talking about when I refer to "city life"...just to be clear. I am talking bustling/noisy areas. You are picking apart my main point with technicalities, when I KNOW you know exactly what my point is. I don't feel I need to list off every neighborhood in every city I would refer to.
In regards to the rat posters never seen them in my neighborhood nor when I lived in Lincoln Park. I have seen them in them in other parts/neighborhoods so rats are found more some areas than others. Again, you can't generalize so much.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-01-2012, 04:01 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
771 posts, read 1,115,545 times
Reputation: 438
I am not trying to argue that city life is as peaceful to rural life. All I am saying is city life can provide you a backyard (more common than not) and quiet, right now the windows are open and everything is quiet with the exception of birds singing. This all happening in a dense, urban neighborhood with plenty of street life. You made a point that you like have a yard and silence. I am just saying that you can easily get that in the city too.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-01-2012, 04:03 PM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,901,330 times
Reputation: 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lizz0rd View Post
Yeah well, technicalities aside, I think you know that it is certainly not like small town/cities in Indiana or Arkansas.
Of course not. Cities in California have dense downtowns surrounded by suburban development. Most of California is a pretty liberal state, so you find a lot of educated people and rich people and smart-growth cities.

California is like an opposite twin to New York. California is mostly sprawl development and sunny weather while NY is more denser developments and four season weather, but both are really liberal.

And California is way different than very sprawled and low density cities in Indiana and Arkansas.

I think some cities in California may look like towns, but are technically cities.

I think city refers to culture and form of government in California vs. how the urban geography is.

City's have a formal governing power, and has art galleries, coffee shops, museums, and the bigger cities and college towns have colleges.

Last edited by the city; 04-01-2012 at 04:45 PM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-01-2012, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 15,057,185 times
Reputation: 4482
Charlotte is not a huge city, but it is definitely "the city" compared to where my family lives and where I went to high school and college. Over the past year, I have been finding myself enjoying more of the natural amenities this area offers more than the bars/clubs uptown. Also, I am more open to the idea of returning to my rural hometown than I was even six months ago. In my late teens/early twenties, my goal in life was to get out of Arkansas at all costs. Now, I am realizing that I made some horrible life decisions in order to achieve that goal. Yes I am out of Arkansas and yes I like Charlotte better than my home town, but I am still struggling to figure out what it is I really want out of life long term and how I am going to achieve my goals when before I was on a sustainable career path even though I lived in "boring" Little Rock, Arkansas.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-01-2012, 05:07 PM
 
Location: Florida
398 posts, read 622,506 times
Reputation: 261
Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
Charlotte is not a huge city, but it is definitely "the city" compared to where my family lives and where I went to high school and college. Over the past year, I have been finding myself enjoying more of the natural amenities this area offers more than the bars/clubs uptown. Also, I am more open to the idea of returning to my rural hometown than I was even six months ago. In my late teens/early twenties, my goal in life was to get out of Arkansas at all costs. Now, I am realizing that I made some horrible life decisions in order to achieve that goal. Yes I am out of Arkansas and yes I like Charlotte better than my home town, but I am still struggling to figure out what it is I really want out of life long term and how I am going to achieve my goals when before I was on a sustainable career path even though I lived in "boring" Little Rock, Arkansas.
Charlotte definitely has some decent nightlife and hip areas. But I would agree, the natural features of North Carolina are better than what any city in that state can offer.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-01-2012, 05:19 PM
 
6,127 posts, read 6,453,158 times
Reputation: 6544
The biggest city I've lived in was a metro of 800K. A year ago I moved to a city of 67K, then I moved out to the country. Now I can't stand the thought of even living in the small city again. The idea of having neighbors right next to me sucks!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-01-2012, 06:15 PM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,783 posts, read 13,372,272 times
Reputation: 11312
Quote:
Originally Posted by 601halfdozen0theother View Post
I'm happy that city people love living in the city, and that us rural people love our less-crowded lives. Thank goodness that most of us can choose where we live! (Yes, I know that's a whole other arguement, but I do believe that almost everyone has a choice.)
Same here!

I think that it's great that basically everyone, as an adult, has the choice to move to an environment that is more conducive to their living preferences. We actually moved to Cambridge, which is more or less a borough of Boston with subway access and all the other great city stuff, when I was 13, and I haven't had a huge desire to live in a small town since. However, my parents had their fill and around the time I moved away from home, they moved with my sisters to a quiet town about 45 minutes north of Boston. They're not, and never have been, city people - I'd feel awful if they had to move back to one for whatever reason since it's just so far outside their preferences.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-01-2012, 07:05 PM
 
6,127 posts, read 6,453,158 times
Reputation: 6544
Quote:
Originally Posted by 415_s2k View Post
Same here!

I think that it's great that basically everyone, as an adult, has the choice to move to an environment that is more conducive to their living preferences. We actually moved to Cambridge, which is more or less a borough of Boston with subway access and all the other great city stuff, when I was 13, and I haven't had a huge desire to live in a small town since. However, my parents had their fill and around the time I moved away from home, they moved with my sisters to a quiet town about 45 minutes north of Boston. They're not, and never have been, city people - I'd feel awful if they had to move back to one for whatever reason since it's just so far outside their preferences.
I think it's great that we live in such a huge, diverse country. There really is something for everyone. I wish I had more money and time to travel!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-03-2012, 12:42 AM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,901,330 times
Reputation: 1290
What would everyone say the difference between city, suburb, and rural community?

In California, I would say:

city
-public transit, centralized downtown, civic amenities, suburban shopping centers
-ex: any place with the name "City of....."

suburb
-freeway orientated, decentralized downtown or none at all, less civic amenities, mostly residential
-ex: can be city or un-incorporated community, but usually identifiable by being near a mid-sized or large city and residential in character. In LA area, Pasadena and Burbank and Glendale. In SF, Burlingame and San Mateo and Colma.

un-incorporated community
-freeway or highway orientated, old fashion downtown, agricultural based, residential
ex: Los Olivos, Arden-Arcade, Avila Beach. Usually will be known in census as "Community name, census designated place)

California doesn't really have towns. What are towns are considered small cities.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top