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Old 04-02-2012, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Rome, Georgia
2,706 posts, read 3,337,977 times
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Georgia has a border dispute with Tennessee regarding access to the Tennessee River.

Drought Has Georgia Revisiting Border Dispute
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Old 04-02-2012, 08:33 PM
 
159 posts, read 265,747 times
Reputation: 95
Florida

Panhandle & North of I-4 - If anyone doubts Florida is Southern they need to pay this region a visit. Jacksonville, Gainesville, Tallahassee & Pensacola - all traditionally Southern cities and wouldn't be out of place in Alabama or Georgia.

I-4 Corridor / Central Florida - Mix of traditional Southerners, transplants from the Midwest and Northeast, Hispanics, retirees, etc. Tampa & Orlando are this regions largest & signature cities.

South Florida (Broward & Palm Beach) - Large population of transplants from the Northeast, large Jewish, Hispanic & Black Islander communities, less noticeably Southern than Central FL but moreso than Miami.

Miami - Distinctly Latinized, heavily Hispanic. Cubans are the largest single ethnic group in the county. Large Latin American & Caribbean Islander immigrant population along with mix of Northern transplants, Europeans and Jews. Miami's "Southernness" is pretty much evident only in the Black American community.

The Keys - Jimmy Buffett.

Floridians feel free to dispute or add onto this.
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Old 04-02-2012, 08:39 PM
 
Location: Tampa, FL
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South Florida (which is really southeast FL... at least that's what most people think of) - Cosmopolitan. Liberal. Northerners. Heavy Latin American influence.

Central FL - Slightly cosmo. Lots of midwesterners and NYers. Some rednecks.

North FL - Banjos and Miller High Life.
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Old 04-02-2012, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10,796 posts, read 9,432,166 times
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Northern Louisiana: Protestant, southern cooking like grits and fried catfish, iced tea, rolling hills with trees and red soil
Southern Louisiana: Catholic, Cajun cuisine like jambalaya, boudin, gumbo, fried seafood, lots of beer, flat prairies, swamps, and marshland
New Orleans: Catholic, Creole cuisine like redfish meuniere, bananas foster, hurricanes and other exotic drinks, urban landscape surrounded by water and swampland or marsh.

Basically, there's New Orleans, Cajun Country, and everything else.
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Old 04-03-2012, 03:57 AM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
9,434 posts, read 18,339,314 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Almost every big city is regarded by people outside the metropolitan areas as an alien place, and vice versa. The non-urban part is often called anything from "Upstate" to "BFE".
No exception to that here in Massachusetts, I-495 is the unofficial boundary of many things revolving around Boston. Within this semi-circular outer suburban highway metro Boston's influences are strongly felt. Cape Cod and the Islands are in their own little world but still fairly connected to Boston. Worcester county is more or less a buffer zone. Everything west of that is Western Mass which is fairly cut off from the rest of the state with different mentalities and a more bucolic part of the state.

New Hampshire could be split in two also. South of Concord and Portsmouth/Rochester is the Southern NH area which is at times coined Northern Mass as there are many little cities, suburbs, and bedroom communities that are closely linked to Mass by commuting and shopping (NHites commute to Mass, people in Mass shop in NH with no sales tax). The real Granite state starts north of the Lakes Region or West of the Merrimack Valley.

Last edited by Desert_SW_77; 04-03-2012 at 04:20 AM..
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Old 04-03-2012, 04:34 AM
 
9,384 posts, read 9,546,239 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caphillsea77 View Post
No exception to that here in Massachusetts, I-495 is the unofficial boundary of many things revolving around Boston. Within this semi-circular outer suburban highway metro Boston's influences are strongly felt. Cape Cod and the Islands are in their own little world but still fairly connected to Boston. Worcester county is more or less a buffer zone. Everything west of that is Western Mass which is fairly cut off from the rest of the state with different mentalities and a more bucolic part of the state.

New Hampshire could be split in two also. South of Concord and Portsmouth/Rochester is the Southern NH area which is at times coined Northern Mass as there are many little cities, suburbs, and bedroom communities that are closely linked to Mass by commuting and shopping (NHites commute to Mass, people in Mass shop in NH with no sales tax). The real Granite state starts north of the Lakes Region or West of the Merrimack Valley.
Don't forget our magical weather barrier, I-90, where snow stops and smiles begin
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Old 04-03-2012, 08:35 AM
 
6,127 posts, read 6,448,498 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WyoEagle View Post
What I mean by this question, is does your state have regions that are thought to be different from the other, either by the attitude of the people there or by distinctive geography? Examples of different areas in states

West and East River South Dakota
Eastern and Western Montana
North and South Idaho

Where I live in Wyoming you don't seem to hear much difference in the different regions.
This. I've only been here a year and I've even found myself making snide comments about "East River." LOL
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Old 04-03-2012, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Englewood, Near Eastside Indy
8,341 posts, read 14,104,968 times
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Indiana has four regions:

1) Indianapolis
2) Northwest Indiana
3) Southern Indiana (everything south of Bloomington)
4) everything else
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Old 04-03-2012, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,281,369 times
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I'm surprised nobody has mentioned that Upper and Lower Michigan are on different continents and speak different languages.

It's been a long time since anybody has thought that Los Angeles and San Francisco are in the same state, or even on the same planet.

One third of Colorado is a state that looks like Kansas.

North of Gainesville, people call it The Real Florida.

Every state that has an Appalachian region refers to that part as being in a "state" of Appalachia, which on some issues enjoys federal status. Or, for example with some colleges giving "residence" status to students from any state's Appalachia, rather than from within the state. In Maryland, that is contemptuously referred to as Garrett County, which is like an undeveloped overseas colony where people should not be allowed to call themselves Marylanders although technically, one supposed, they could be.

Last edited by jtur88; 04-03-2012 at 08:54 AM..
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Old 04-03-2012, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,771,019 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Every state that has an Appalachian region refers to that part as being in a "state" of Appalachia, which on some issues enjoys federal status. Or, for example with some colleges giving "residence" status to students from any state's Appalachia, rather than from within the state. In Maryland, that is contemptuously referred to as Garrett County, which is like an undeveloped overseas colony where people should not be allowed to call themselves Marylanders although technically, one supposed, they could be.
Sounds like NE Louisiana.
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