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Old 04-04-2012, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,227,706 times
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Culturally and linguistically, these are the state lines i'd use: South of Joplin, Springfield, and Cape Girardeau is I where I would say you have for all intents and purposes entered Arkansas. North of these cities, and south of KC, JC, and STL is an area of a mixed identity, half-Midwest and half-southern. Starting at KC, JC, and STL and going north, you're in the Midwest. If I were only allowed to use two lines, I'd probably say that the southern half of the transition zone would be considered the south, the northern half the midwest. That puts about 50% of Southern Missouri in the south, 25% of the whole state. 75% is the Midwest.

As far as topography goes, Missouri's requires at minimum 4 lines. The river valleys of the Mississippi and Missouri, the Ozarks, the Dissected Till Plains, and the Osage Plains (some choose to group Osage with Dissected Till).

Without question, Missouri is one of the most topographically and economically diverse states in the country.

Last edited by stlouisan; 04-04-2012 at 10:11 AM..
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Old 04-04-2012, 07:05 PM
 
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Absolutely.

Northwest Indiana (Lake County, esp) - Working class, rust belt

Indianapolis - One of the bigger cities in the Midwest, kind of a metropolis

The rest of Indiana - Hicks!
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Old 04-04-2012, 10:39 PM
 
Location: south central
606 posts, read 952,529 times
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Massachusetts:

Boston Metro which can be subdivided into:
Boston (including Cambridge, Somerville, Brookline, Chelsea, etc.)
North Shore
South Shore

Cape Cod

Southeast/Bristol Co. (Fall River, New Bedford, Taunton)

Western Massachusetts
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Old 04-05-2012, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
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The most fundamental cultural divide in Minnesota is probably between residents of the Twin Cities metro and those of anywhere outside it ("outstate" / "outstaters").

As for geographic diversity, there's a lot of it. You have the pine forests and lakes of the northeast, the prairies in the west and south, and the rolling hills ("driftless region") of the southeast.
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Old 04-05-2012, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
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New York:

New York has a lot of cultural regions as it really sits in a junction between many other states/provinces. Two forms of Canada, upper and lower New England, Appalachia, the Great Lakes, etc.

Downstate is the NYC area. A very urbanized area with highly connected transportation and a lot of high scale well-to-do sorts, and a large Jewish population.

Southern tier/hill country is part of northern Appalachia and includes the Finger lakes for the most part (generally hill country is the land between the PA border and routes 5 and 20, anything Allegheny basically). This area is very rural/small town with some small scale cities like Ithaca, Binghamton, Corning, etc. Has a lot in common with middle and western Pennsylvania. My home region.

The capitol region is where most of the other regions meet, creating a kind of heart for the state. You have downstate influences up the Hudson valley, hill country influences from the Catskills and Mohawk valley, north country influences as well, and it's firmly connected to the Ontario corridor via I-90.

The Ontario plains are dominated by the Syracuse/Rochester/Buffalo corridor with very Midwestern like farmland between. This area has a unique culture to it. And a distinct accent to the experienced ear.

North county/Adirondacks is a lot like the southern tier only generally wealthier and actually less populated. Has major cultural influences from upper New England and Canada.

You also have sub regions that overlap or are part of the above. Finger lakes, Western NY, Central NY, Upstate as a whole, Long Island, and so forth.

Louisiana:

Southeast Louisiana/Florida parishes. Heavily Catholic, lots of French ancestry. Definitely the most urban region of the state with Baton Rouge and New Orleans and several places between. Has a lot in common with southern Mississippi. I currently live here.

Cajun land. Usually marked by the triangle of Lafayette, Alexandria and Lake Charles. This is the best region of the state in my opinion. Most of the actual Cajuns live here, the state's unique prairie is here, and basically all the authentic goodness Louisiana has to offer.

North Louisiana is what I've heard referred to as the actual "sportsman's paradise." North Louisiana is much more like the rest of the south culturally and is largely rural/small town. It's also the only area of the state with actual hills. See: Driskill mountain.
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Old 04-05-2012, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,227,706 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lake County IN View Post
Absolutely.

Northwest Indiana (Lake County, esp) - Working class, rust belt

Indianapolis - One of the bigger cities in the Midwest, kind of a metropolis

The rest of Indiana - Hicks!
lol that's kind of of on par with describing St. Louis, Kansas City, then the rest of Missouri.
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Old 04-05-2012, 11:51 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,219 posts, read 17,954,379 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cwa1984 View Post
WTF? I agree with I-81 being a dividing line with PA but the I-80 comment is throwing me for a loop.
North of I-80, the culture and the built environment are similar to the southern tier of upstate New York. South of I-80 is where most of the action has been throughout Pennsylvania's history, so most things that are considered "quintessential Pennsylvania" originated from there.
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Old 04-05-2012, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,100 posts, read 4,733,270 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
North of I-80, the culture and the built environment are similar to the southern tier of upstate New York. South of I-80 is where most of the action has been throughout Pennsylvania's history, so most things that are considered "quintessential Pennsylvania" originated from there.
Makes sense.

He's a fair cop.
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Old 04-05-2012, 01:29 PM
 
12 posts, read 19,679 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WyoEagle View Post
Where I live in Wyoming you don't seem to hear much difference in the different regions.
True story. Passing from Evanston to Laramie, NOTHING changes!
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Old 04-05-2012, 01:36 PM
 
5,116 posts, read 4,623,952 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
I'm surprised nobody has mentioned that Upper and Lower Michigan are on different continents and speak different languages.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
What on earth are you talking about?
Peninsulas...the correct term is peninsulas.

And Michigan is much more divided than that...



(image shamelessly stolen from a link in a thread found on the Michigan sub-forum).
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