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Old 04-09-2012, 10:27 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
I agree with your definition of upstate and downstate 100%! That's how I learned it when growing up there. Just curious, are you a native or a transplant?
I consider the idea of Orange, Putnam, and Dutchess being upstate is laughable. I also consider Ulster downstate. I grew up in southern Westchester and had lots of teachers who commuted daily from Poughkeepsie, Wappinger's Falls, Kingston, Middletown, etc.

Downstate (according to someone :-)

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Old 04-10-2012, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,100 posts, read 4,734,481 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
I consider the idea of Orange, Putnam, and Dutchess being upstate is laughable. I also consider Ulster downstate. I grew up in southern Westchester and had lots of teachers who commuted daily from Poughkeepsie, Wappinger's Falls, Kingston, Middletown, etc.

Downstate (according to someone :-)
I actually agree with that map under a single small alteration. I usually consider Ulster county as split.

There are parts of north/west Ulster that are much more akin to the nearby southern Tier (basically the portions of the county in the mountains).

But aside from that your definition is also mine. And most upstaters would agree.
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Old 04-10-2012, 01:21 PM
 
110 posts, read 248,226 times
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Ok, I hope nobody is judging me, but I was watching an episode of Real Housewives of Atlanta once and a bunch of them were on a bus trip. They stopped off in some rural area of the state and one of them said, "This isn't the state of Georgia I know!" This is actually a reasonable comment for someone who lives in metro Atlanta, but sounds ludicrous to someone who lives in any other area of the state.

So this is a map that I made. before Atlanta got so big, there were 4 distinct regions:

North Georgia: Very Appalachian, overwhelmingly white, not really associated with the deep south. For example, this was really the only area in Georgia where Republicans were competitive in the days of the solid south, and the region was firmly against secession during the civil war.

Piedmont: Central Georgia south of the mountains and north of the fall line. I think this is the Georgia that has long been in the minds of most people. It's got the rolling hills, the lush pine and oak forests, the red clay, and the distinctive southern culture. I think Gone With the Wind really did a lot to make this region the "default" Georgia.

The dirty dirty south: South of a line from Columbus to Macon to Augusta, the hills suddenly stop rolling, the red clay turns darker and the heat gets more oppressive. This is the plantation area of Georgia, the area with the highest black population, and unfortunately, the ugliest battles during the civil rights era. Some call this area deep, dark south Georgia. Maybe because it seems to still be stuck in the dark ages in some parts- intense segregation, lack of infrastructure, grinding poverty. Most folks from other areas of the state don't venture down here that much for those reasons. Still, it can have some amazing natural beauty

The Coast/Lowcountry. This might be the favorite part of Georgia for Atlantans to visit. It's probably the fastest growing region of the state outside of Atlanta, thanks to resort communities popping up. It has the beaches, the marshes, and the classy resorts, like the Cloister on Sea Island. And if you haven't heard of Sea Island, I suggest you look it up. it's one of the most exclusive resort islands on the east coast. And then there's Savannah, ahh Savannah. It Atlanta is fast paced, lacking in history and moving away from its southern roots, then Savannah is its antithesis. Just the mention of Savannah sets my heart aflutter. It's graceful yet quirky, lush with live Oaks, and dripping with history. Ok, I'll stop.

The growing stain on Georgia: Yup, it's Atlanta. At one point, Atl was just another Piedmont city with regional influence. But it has grown quickly and become its own. It took millions of years for the Appalachians to form and give North Georgia its own culture, and hundreds of years of slavery to give South Georgia its distinct segregation history, but Atlanta as a region came into its own in just a few decades. Geographically, it's not different from the rest of the Piedmont, but culturally, it's a different world. It's fast growing, dynamic, and growing more diverse by the day. And its ever growing sprawl continues to transform a large swath of the state, bringing subdivisions, transplants and shopping centers to small towns. As a Georgian, you either love it or hate it, there's not much middle ground.

And I would be Remiss if I didn't talk about Athens, GA. It may be the smallest region of Georgia, but a region nonetheless. It's a dark blue Island in a sea of red. It's young, hip, and has that sense of cultural superiority. And I can say that because I live here. If Athens were a person it would be a moody teenager who hates where he is. He'd rather be living with his cool older brother Austin Texas or his older sister Berkeley California.

Last edited by cope1989; 04-10-2012 at 01:44 PM..
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