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Old 04-05-2012, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,440 posts, read 31,756,105 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GunnerTHB View Post
Define irony: The flattest part of Missouri is the part of Missouri that's not considered to be part of the Midwest .
Love it!
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Old 04-05-2012, 04:11 PM
 
Location: The State Of California
9,470 posts, read 12,326,313 times
Reputation: 3596
Quote:
Originally Posted by MOKAN View Post
I was talking to a friend about Arkansas and how cool I think the landscape is there. We are both Kansas City natives and while he's been everywhere, it's interesting he hasn't seen Arkansas except Eureka Springs, which is just south of the Missouri-Arkansas border. For the record, I think Arkansas beats both Missouri and Oklahoma in terms of mountainous terrain. Most of the western 2/3rds of Arkansas is interesting and has both the Ozark mountains and Ouachita mountains, which are divided by the Arkansas river valley, which makes for an interesting feature in and of itself. However, while Arkansas has quality, large lakes, it simply seems to have fewer than either Missouri or Oklahoma. This is the line of thinking that prompted me to start this thread. Missouri and Oklahoma seem very close in terms of interesting geography. Personally, I haven't seen all there is to see in either state so I can't be sure which is more interesting, but I know they are close. I haven't seen the most mountainous terrain in Missouri (Mark Twain National Forest, St. Francois mountains) south of STL, for example. Nor have I seen the Wichita mountains in Oklahoma.

All that said, both Missouri and Oklahoma each have several large lakes. Both have a similar sized area of mountains. Oklahoma perhaps has a bit more variety in that they have the Quachitas, Ozarks, and Wichita Mountains. Missouri has its river valley. Oklahoma has the Osage Hills (which actually extend northward into Kansas, forming one of Kansas' most interesting areas).

Missouri and Oklahoma seem so close, but which is more interesting?

Oklahoma edges Missouri both in "Mountain Ranges" and " Lakes Sizes "
and has the "Gumption To even Have A Desert" go figure will ya....
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Old 04-06-2012, 08:50 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
6,886 posts, read 6,209,806 times
Reputation: 6187
Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post

And Oklahoma outside of the mountainous areas is quite flat.
Not really. A lot of "non mountainous" areas of Oklahoma consists of undulating to rolling hills. I would say that about 20-25% of Oklahoma is pancake or close to pancake flat. 50% is rolling hills and 25% is "mountainous"
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Old 04-07-2012, 08:12 AM
 
Location: The State Of California
9,470 posts, read 12,326,313 times
Reputation: 3596
Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
Not really. A lot of "non mountainous" areas of Oklahoma consists of undulating to rolling hills. I would say that about 20-25% of Oklahoma is pancake or close to pancake flat. 50% is rolling hills and 25% is "mountainous"
I agree 100% with that , and when you really take a close look at all of the " mountainous area" of the State of Oklahoma and place them in a ( Competition With Missouri) Oklahoma wins hands down.
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Old 04-08-2012, 12:10 AM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,440 posts, read 31,756,105 times
Reputation: 15560
Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
Not really. A lot of "non mountainous" areas of Oklahoma consists of undulating to rolling hills. I would say that about 20-25% of Oklahoma is pancake or close to pancake flat. 50% is rolling hills and 25% is "mountainous"
Where did you get your degree in geology?
You failed to mention that.
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Old 04-08-2012, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,232,832 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
Not really. A lot of "non mountainous" areas of Oklahoma consists of undulating to rolling hills. I would say that about 20-25% of Oklahoma is pancake or close to pancake flat. 50% is rolling hills and 25% is "mountainous"
I'm guessing you've never driven I-35 or I-40 in Oklahoma. West of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma is flat as a board.
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Old 04-08-2012, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Bentonville, AR
1,029 posts, read 2,573,761 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
I'm guessing you've never driven I-35 or I-40 in Oklahoma. West of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma is flat as a board.
Well that's not entirely true. Do a google image search for Mt Scott, Glass mountains, black mesa, arbuckle mountains, quartz mountain, antelope hills. Driving along the interstate on I-40, that may be true. But much of western Oklahoma has some interesting topography. Judging a state by it's interstate views is equal to judging a book by it's cover.
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Old 04-08-2012, 05:37 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
6,886 posts, read 6,209,806 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
I'm guessing you've never driven I-35 or I-40 in Oklahoma. West of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma is flat as a board.
I drive I-40 west of Oklahoma City about 3 times a week from OKC to Elk City. i Just did it about an hour ago.

I've probably driven I-35 from Tonkawa to OKC about 40-50 times or more.

Part of I-40 west is flat. Say OKC to El Reno. It's not really flat from there to Elk City. There are some flat spots around Elk City and around Erick. The country is wide open but it isn't flat.

Here are elevations measured in feet along I 40 west.

OKC-1295
El Reno 1420
Hinton 1676
Hydro 1555
Weatherford 1605
Clinton 1616
Elk City 1919
Erick 2097

Net Change in elevation 802 feet

And this doesn't include the huge drop and climb in elevation from the Calumet exit down into the Canadian River Bottom and back up to Hinton, Furthermore there isn't much change in elevation between Weatherford and Clinton but there are some robust hills in the 13 miles between the two towns. Finally, if you'll notice, there is a 300 foot elevation change in the 25 or so miles between Clinton and Elk City. I bring this up because this in this section the hills are more gradual than they are between Weatherford and Clinton but the elevation gain is pretty significant.

And although I don't have a degree in geology, I have driven the state of Oklahoma from corner to corner to corner to corner through the years and know what it is like better than most.

Funny thing is although I've cut a trail through Missouri a few times I'm not on here telling Missourians about their own state. I have some opinions but I would take a Missourians word at face value concerning the nuances of Missouri.

Last edited by eddie gein; 04-08-2012 at 06:51 PM..
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Old 04-08-2012, 10:10 PM
 
Location: Kansas City, MO
3,572 posts, read 6,508,945 times
Reputation: 2574
Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
I'm guessing you've never driven I-35 or I-40 in Oklahoma. West of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma is flat as a board.
Interstates were built along the path of least resistence where possible. Several years ago somebody on another forum, SSP, gave an outstanding online photo tour of the geography of Nebraska and it's amazing how beautiful that state is once you get off I-80 and outside of the Platte River Valley. I wish that thread were still up and wish all of us had one for every state to enjoy and reference. It was that good.
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Old 04-08-2012, 11:14 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,232,832 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
I drive I-40 west of Oklahoma City about 3 times a week from OKC to Elk City. i Just did it about an hour ago.

I've probably driven I-35 from Tonkawa to OKC about 40-50 times or more.

Part of I-40 west is flat. Say OKC to El Reno. It's not really flat from there to Elk City. There are some flat spots around Elk City and around Erick. The country is wide open but it isn't flat.

Here are elevations measured in feet along I 40 west.

OKC-1295
El Reno 1420
Hinton 1676
Hydro 1555
Weatherford 1605
Clinton 1616
Elk City 1919
Erick 2097

Net Change in elevation 802 feet

And this doesn't include the huge drop and climb in elevation from the Calumet exit down into the Canadian River Bottom and back up to Hinton, Furthermore there isn't much change in elevation between Weatherford and Clinton but there are some robust hills in the 13 miles between the two towns. Finally, if you'll notice, there is a 300 foot elevation change in the 25 or so miles between Clinton and Elk City. I bring this up because this in this section the hills are more gradual than they are between Weatherford and Clinton but the elevation gain is pretty significant.

And although I don't have a degree in geology, I have driven the state of Oklahoma from corner to corner to corner to corner through the years and know what it is like better than most.

Funny thing is although I've cut a trail through Missouri a few times I'm not on here telling Missourians about their own state. I have some opinions but I would take a Missourians word at face value concerning the nuances of Missouri.
Is that supposed to be some kind of offensive remark? Because if it is, I'm offended.
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