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Old 04-13-2012, 06:07 PM
 
Location: Kentucky
311 posts, read 692,962 times
Reputation: 161

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kshe95girl View Post
Get off the main roads, and you would be surprised at how much it actually does look like it did originally.
Trust me, I know the Bootheel like the back of my hand. But, Mingo and Duck Creek, no matter how cool, are but a mere shadow of what used to be a 2 million acre swamp.

Been on about every gravel road between Dexter and the river, from the Benton Hills down to Arkansas. I've seen a thing or two
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Old 04-13-2012, 06:22 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,847 posts, read 30,364,616 times
Reputation: 22356
Quote:
Originally Posted by MOKAN View Post
I was talking to a friend about Arkansas and how cool I think the landscape is there. We are both Kansas City natives and while he's been everywhere, it's interesting he hasn't seen Arkansas except Eureka Springs, which is just south of the Missouri-Arkansas border. For the record, I think Arkansas beats both Missouri and Oklahoma in terms of mountainous terrain. Most of the western 2/3rds of Arkansas is interesting and has both the Ozark mountains and Ouachita mountains, which are divided by the Arkansas river valley, which makes for an interesting feature in and of itself. However, while Arkansas has quality, large lakes, it simply seems to have fewer than either Missouri or Oklahoma. This is the line of thinking that prompted me to start this thread. Missouri and Oklahoma seem very close in terms of interesting geography. Personally, I haven't seen all there is to see in either state so I can't be sure which is more interesting, but I know they are close. I haven't seen the most mountainous terrain in Missouri (Mark Twain National Forest, St. Francois mountains) south of STL, for example. Nor have I seen the Wichita mountains in Oklahoma.

All that said, both Missouri and Oklahoma each have several large lakes. Both have a similar sized area of mountains. Oklahoma perhaps has a bit more variety in that they have the Quachitas, Ozarks, and Wichita Mountains. Missouri has its river valley. Oklahoma has the Osage Hills (which actually extend northward into Kansas, forming one of Kansas' most interesting areas).

Missouri and Oklahoma seem so close, but which is more interesting?
From your post it would appear that you are somewhat stuck on the concept that "mountains" are the quintessential landscape feature. Personally, mountains don't do much for me, aside from the Ouachita Mountains that you refer to in your OP.

For me, the Oklahoma plains and "hills" are just as beautiful. It's really difficult to compare apples to oranges, and that is what you are trying to do. Each state is beautiful in it's own unique way.

I am personally pretty partial to Missouri but Arkansas is a very close second. As for Oklahoma, it's beautiful in a different way, as is Kansas and Texas and even Kentucky and Tennessee.

Trying to pick the "most interesting" one is like saying, which of your kids do you love the most? You love them all differently, but not one more than another.

20yrsinBranson
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Old 04-13-2012, 07:00 PM
 
Location: West Tennessee
2,082 posts, read 2,900,302 times
Reputation: 1337
Quote:
Originally Posted by lmcintyre1s View Post
Trust me, I know the Bootheel like the back of my hand. But, Mingo and Duck Creek, no matter how cool, are but a mere shadow of what used to be a 2 million acre swamp.

Been on about every gravel road between Dexter and the river, from the Benton Hills down to Arkansas. I've seen a thing or two
You aren't the only one.
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Old 04-13-2012, 07:46 PM
 
3,644 posts, read 9,003,989 times
Reputation: 1798
Quote:
Originally Posted by kshe95girl View Post
I wish I had a dollar for every time I have made that drive.
Never even occurred to to me that it might be scary for some folks.
It's scary driving out of St. Louis at night because it's very up & down and curvy. Feels like a roller coaster. I'm used to interstates being flat. It doesn't get "normal" til around Cape Girardeau, but by then, I've gotten used to it
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Old 04-13-2012, 07:48 PM
 
Location: Kansas City, MO
3,572 posts, read 6,501,952 times
Reputation: 2574
Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
From your post it would appear that you are somewhat stuck on the concept that "mountains" are the quintessential landscape feature. Personally, mountains don't do much for me, aside from the Ouachita Mountains that you refer to in your OP.

For me, the Oklahoma plains and "hills" are just as beautiful. It's really difficult to compare apples to oranges, and that is what you are trying to do. Each state is beautiful in it's own unique way.

I am personally pretty partial to Missouri but Arkansas is a very close second. As for Oklahoma, it's beautiful in a different way, as is Kansas and Texas and even Kentucky and Tennessee.

Trying to pick the "most interesting" one is like saying, which of your kids do you love the most? You love them all differently, but not one more than another.

20yrsinBranson
Don't get me wrong, I'm not stuck on the mountains, but I do like them. I actually like Kansas a great deal, if that tells you anything.
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Old 04-13-2012, 07:56 PM
 
Location: IN
20,852 posts, read 35,964,992 times
Reputation: 13297
Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
From your post it would appear that you are somewhat stuck on the concept that "mountains" are the quintessential landscape feature. Personally, mountains don't do much for me, aside from the Ouachita Mountains that you refer to in your OP.

For me, the Oklahoma plains and "hills" are just as beautiful. It's really difficult to compare apples to oranges, and that is what you are trying to do. Each state is beautiful in it's own unique way.

I am personally pretty partial to Missouri but Arkansas is a very close second. As for Oklahoma, it's beautiful in a different way, as is Kansas and Texas and even Kentucky and Tennessee.

Trying to pick the "most interesting" one is like saying, which of your kids do you love the most? You love them all differently, but not one more than another.

20yrsinBranson
The Cumberland Plateau is very interesting due to the tree types and vegetation differences in short distances. You might have magnolia with kudzu mixed with white pine, pitch pine, and maple.
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Old 04-14-2012, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,440 posts, read 31,730,271 times
Reputation: 15560
Quote:
Originally Posted by lmcintyre1s View Post
Trust me, I know the Bootheel like the back of my hand. But, Mingo and Duck Creek, no matter how cool, are but a mere shadow of what used to be a 2 million acre swamp.

Been on about every gravel road between Dexter and the river, from the Benton Hills down to Arkansas. I've seen a thing or two
Part of my family has been in SEMO since before Butler County was platted out, I'm just a wee bit familiar with the area.
There ARE places where it is just as it was in eastern Butler County.
Heck, just outside Risco, (which my GG grandfather founded) theres still pristine swamp.
Risco, Missouri - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
My family still owns all 1200 acres of it.
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Old 04-14-2012, 01:14 PM
 
Location: 3219'03.7"N 10643'55.9"W
8,115 posts, read 17,331,159 times
Reputation: 7287
Default Oklahoma Panhandle

Might be the outlier in this discussion. Cimmaron County Oklahoma is a place of transition, where the Great Plains begin to give way to the Intermontaine West.

Black Mesa, the highest point in Oklahoma, is almost a mile high, at 4,973 feet above sea level. It's one of those quirky places on my bucket list of where I would love to ''summit' one day.

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Old 04-14-2012, 01:44 PM
 
Location: IN
20,852 posts, read 35,964,992 times
Reputation: 13297
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike0421 View Post
Might be the outlier in this discussion. Cimmaron County Oklahoma is a place of transition, where the Great Plains begin to give way to the Intermontaine West.

Black Mesa, the highest point in Oklahoma, is almost a mile high, at 4,973 feet above sea level. It's one of those quirky places on my bucket list of where I would love to ''summit' one day.
IMO, I would classify all of western Oklahoma as being part of the West. It does not feature much in the way of an agrarian Plains vegetation environment since the primary economic activity is ranching, oil and gas anyway.
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Old 04-14-2012, 05:18 PM
 
3,970 posts, read 11,835,009 times
Reputation: 1576
I took my first trip through the Branson, MO areas last summer. Was impressed how beautiful that area is. Rolling hills, even bigger hills, beautiful lake, never knew.

I also remember OK is really two, or perhaps three states. The eastern section is very green. There are some moderately high mountains to the south-central. And has been mentioned, the panhandle is also another world.
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