U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-13-2007, 10:03 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,462 posts, read 14,030,416 times
Reputation: 4425
Default What city has the most 1950's era feel?

What city do you think screams 1950's vintage the most? Where the majority of the city was built in the 1950s?

My vote would be Phoenix, AZ. Population of Phoenix in 1950 was 106,818. It was nothing but a desert agricultural and resort town, with an air force base or two. By 1960 the population rose to 439,170. The city continued to boom exponentially, until the present day (almost 4 million people), but the 1950s is when it really began to kick off. There are probably several hundred square miles of neighborhoods built in the post-war era here, with the ubiquitous 1 story ranch design. In certain neighborhoods since then, people have done extensive remodeling and additions to these houses. Homes that may have once been all tract homes now have a lot of individuality. A lot of the original 1950s era strip malls are still around, but the original tenants have been replaced with mom-and-pop businesses and restaurants. Some of these 1950's neighborhoods, such as Maryvale, have had a complete population shift, are now basically Mexican barrios. Others, like most of north-central Phoenix, are still predominantly white middle class areas. Phoenix might be the one city in America where 1950's era construction is actually designated as "historic." In fact, there's even a term that 1950's/60's buffs throw around here-- "midcentury modern." Think Frank Lloyd Wright, etc.

What cities would you guys vote?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-14-2007, 12:57 AM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
11,886 posts, read 10,606,448 times
Reputation: 14459
Default Tucson

I was going to say Tucson, AZ. You may also want to look at Sunnyvale, CA. The cities near Sunnyvale are making big changes in how they look. For instance, Mountain View and Cupertino are modernizing their look. Sunnyvale is still trying hard to look as it did in the 50s.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-14-2007, 12:57 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,746 posts, read 3,238,484 times
Reputation: 660
I think that a lot of things along Route 66 in Oklahoma, New Mexico, and Arizona has strong '50s characteristics to it. For actual cities, that is a tough one, I really couldn't answer that question.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-14-2007, 04:06 AM
 
2,357 posts, read 233,578 times
Reputation: 864
I would say that downtown Memphis, TN has a 1950's feel, at least at the the more touristy areas around Beale Street.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-14-2007, 04:53 AM
 
Location: NJ
11,642 posts, read 20,825,680 times
Reputation: 4429
Wildwood and Wildwood Crest NJ is known for its 50's motel (aka "Doo W O P") architecture (i can't type out W O P, lol). The streets are lined with these types of motels, and there's a preservation society in place to retain the look and feel..

Here's a sampling of pictures:

Gallery - Doo W O P Motels
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-14-2007, 05:25 AM
 
Location: Kentucky
6,758 posts, read 14,560,114 times
Reputation: 2021
Shively, Kentucky. Most of the nighborhoods here were built in the 50's (my house included) and most of the structures have been the same FOREVER lol
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-14-2007, 08:59 AM
 
Location: 38° 38' 45" N, -90° 20' 08" W
7,646 posts, read 11,164,796 times
Reputation: 6169
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
I think that a lot of things along Route 66 in Oklahoma, New Mexico, and Arizona has strong '50s characteristics to it. For actual cities, that is a tough one, I really couldn't answer that question.
I agree completely. Towns such as Elk City Oklahoma, Amarillo Texas, Tucumcari and Grants New Mexico, and Williams Arizona downtowns steeped in 50s architecture.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-14-2007, 09:06 AM
 
Location: San Diego
84 posts, read 4,885 times
Reputation: 15
Strongly agree with the fact that Arizona has many towns that feel just like walking into the '50s.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-14-2007, 05:22 PM
 
Location: Thumb of Michigan
4,424 posts, read 4,958,489 times
Reputation: 2441
Harlan, Kentucky

Not only does it looks like the 50's, it also feels like the 50'S!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-14-2007, 05:39 PM
 
6,351 posts, read 13,026,577 times
Reputation: 9682
My vote goes to the stretches of CA 99 (at least the parts that haven't been ruined by tract houses and latté bars...) still reminds me of the rich agricultural heritage of areas like the Central Valley.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top