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Old 04-15-2012, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Toronto
3,338 posts, read 5,797,682 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Atticman View Post
I'm Canadian (live in Toronto, raised in Northern Ontario) and I took that quiz and ended up with the "neutral accent".
That's interesting. I'm from Toronto; I actually took the test and it picked up on my Canadian accent.

I took the test and I got this result at the end:


Which American accent do you have?

My Results:


Canadian
People from outside North America probably think you`re from the States, but over here we wouldn't make such a mistake.
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Old 04-15-2012, 01:45 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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I can pick up on a Canadian accents, but many Canadian accents seem less strong to me than most Southern accents and even some Great Lakes ones.

I got Northeastern accent on the quiz.
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Old 04-15-2012, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Yorkshire, England
5,599 posts, read 8,288,967 times
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I was hoping my answers would make the program crash but I got 'Northeastern' - makes sense, considering I live 3000 miles further to the NE than any of you


Which American accent do you have?

My Results:


Northeastern This could either mean an r-less NYC or Providence accent or one from Jersey which doesn't sound the same. Just because you got this result doesn't mean you don`t pronounce R's.(People in Jersey don`t call their state "Joisey" in real life)
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Old 04-15-2012, 02:08 PM
 
Location: West Tennessee
2,082 posts, read 2,902,341 times
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Which American accent do you have?

My Results:


I live about 30 miles north of the boundary in SE Missouri. And I was born after 1989.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kshe95girl View Post
I've noticed that, too.


I'd like to know the answer, too.
Something else strange.....a lot of the older women in Ste Gen would say "hairs" instead of "hair", when referring to what was on top of their heads.
My dad always hypothesized that it had something to do with every one of those women speaking German at home.
I have no idea, but I sure would like to know the deal on that.
I've noticed that little regional quirk has all but died out.
Maybe the same thing is true for the "Warsh" thing. Are there any speech characteristics in French, German or Irish that would make someone want to put an R in there? The Warsh thing seems to be pretty specific to a hundred mile radius or so of St. Louis, maybe more. I hear in in Cape County sometimes and the only person off of the top of my head that I can remember saying it was of German heritage.
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Old 04-15-2012, 02:10 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ben86 View Post
I was hoping my answers would make the program crash but I got 'Northeastern' - makes sense, considering I live 3000 miles further to the NE than any of you


Northeastern This could either mean an r-less NYC or Providence accent or one from Jersey which doesn't sound the same. Just because you got this result doesn't mean you don`t pronounce R's.(People in Jersey don`t call their state "Joisey" in real life)
Do you drop your r's? I do once in a while when I'm talking faster?

The New York City has more vowels than other American accents like many British accents; most American accents have merged them. For example mary/marry/merry all sound different to a New Yorker and I think in a typical British accent.

Do you rhyme "bad" and "had"? I don't but I think most American don't ?

Phonological history of English short A - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

British accents I think distinguish between the two, but with different vowel sounds.
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Old 04-15-2012, 03:31 PM
 
1,257 posts, read 3,097,879 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
Yes and No. I think that accents are strongly divided by race and by socio-economic status. More likely than not if you have a younger person who is upper middle class (or upper class) they are not going to have an accent but instead sound more like the typical "valley girl" accent that you make reference to. Working class, or blue collar people tend to have the regional accent (including younger people), and of course ethnic people tend to have accents that coincide with their racial identity.

At least this has been my experience.

20yrsinBranson
Very perceptive, I definitely agree.

I've noticed accents do change with time, watch movies from the 30's or 40's

Regional accents are weakening, however less among working class or blue collar.
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Old 04-15-2012, 03:38 PM
 
Location: Yorkshire, England
5,599 posts, read 8,288,967 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Do you drop your r's? I do once in a while when I'm talking faster?

The New York City has more vowels than other American accents like many British accents; most American accents have merged them. For example mary/marry/merry all sound different to a New Yorker and I think in a typical British accent.

Do you rhyme "bad" and "had"? I don't but I think most American don't ?

Phonological history of English short A - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

British accents I think distinguish between the two, but with different vowel sounds.
I've no idea why I came out as a Northeastern accent to be honest - as far as R's are concerned I'd definitely pronounce them in words like 'bar'/'car' etc. Mary/merry/marry I'd pronounce all differently (most British accents would) but I would rhyme 'bad' and 'had' with a short 'a' (how would you pronounce them if not with the same 'a'?).

I tend to consciously or subconsciously try to 'sound local' wherever I go, which considering the amount of places I've lived in and the amount of foreign languages stored at the back of my brain means that my everyday accent can sometimes be an odd mish-mash which varies a lot depending on who I'm talking to, what tone of voice I'm using, what state of mind I'm in, etc - some people think I'm putting on fake accents half the time, but I'm not! Whilst I've been in London I've never had an American ask where I was from or comment on how I talk but I remember one I met in Italy once asked me if English was my second language and I'd just learnt it with a British accent
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Old 04-15-2012, 05:56 PM
 
1,243 posts, read 1,597,722 times
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The yellow blobs are totally off on the accent maps
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Old 04-15-2012, 06:46 PM
 
Location: West Tennessee
2,082 posts, read 2,902,341 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nephi215 View Post
The yellow blobs are totally off on the accent maps
I think they are based on a 1987 study. Maybe some areas have changed since then.
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Old 04-15-2012, 09:59 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,699 posts, read 8,496,721 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stumbler. View Post
That's interesting. I'm from Toronto; I actually took the test and it picked up on my Canadian accent.

I took the test and I got this result at the end:


Which American accent do you have?

My Results:


Canadian
People from outside North America probably think you`re from the States, but over here we wouldn't make such a mistake.
Haha! Wow, I like how it just stops at Quebec like there aren't native English accents endemic to the region >.<

I'm from QC and got Neutral as well, the accents are similar to ones from Ontario but have a few notable differences, like Merry and Mary not rhyming and less pronounced Canadian raising phenomenons. Best characterized as an Ontario accent with a smidgen of Yankee and of course some influence from French.
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