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Old 10-09-2012, 06:10 PM
 
Location: IN
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Oh yes, regional accents still exist, even younger people. I think regional accents are becoming even more distinctive over time, particularly between the Upper Midwest and Lower Midwest.
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Old 02-14-2015, 07:57 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Oh yes, regional accents still exist, even younger people. I think regional accents are becoming even more distinctive over time, particularly between the Upper Midwest and Lower Midwest.
Ohio has a pretty big difference between Cleveland and the rest of the state.
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Old 02-14-2015, 10:15 PM
 
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Depends on the area. In rural NC, southern accents are still very much prominent among younger generations. Urban NC, not so much. These areas are becoming more diverse as outside transplants continue to pour in, therefore younger generations are speaking in an accent that is less stereotypically southern and more neutral. Around Raleigh in particular, even folks born after 1980 don't sound too southern. Transplanted families (mainly from the northeast) have been moving into the Raleigh/Durham area since the 1960's due to the RTP boom. Kids today still say "y'all" and might sound southern to northern folks, though. I'm a younger Raleigh native, but my friend from Minnesota and another from Boston can definitely hear some southern in my accent.

Last edited by JayJayCB; 02-14-2015 at 10:23 PM..
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Old 02-14-2015, 11:05 PM
 
Location: Earth
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I grew up in suburban Boston (1978) but I got a neutral accent. That's probably because I had a father from Jersey, a mother from CT and they forbid me from speaking like a local. If dared to say CAH or PAHK like my friends, they wouldn't acknowledge me. It was strange because all of my friends spoke like that.

In modern day Boston, you'll almost never hear the traditional Boston accent in the nicer parts of Boston or Cambridge, but you'll still hear from the old timers and from white people of all ages in the working class suburbs.
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Old 02-15-2015, 01:01 AM
 
Location: New Orleans, LA
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Ohhh yeah, come to South Louisiana. My grandpa (born 1929) grew up an hour south of New Orleans and spoke French as his first language. I'd be willing to bet I could still find a few people born after 1990 that do as well if I go deep enough into the swamp. Lots of 20 y/o's have a local accent in this city as well. All the cajun towns like Houma and Thibodaux do as well... very thick. Hard to understand thick. They haven't changed a penny in 200+ years and probably never will ...
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Old 02-15-2015, 01:05 AM
 
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A lot of metro areas don't really have an accent, lots of transplants in and out.

The Deep South certainly do as well as the Upper Midwest.
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Old 02-15-2015, 07:19 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
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I was born and raised in Lexington, KY (decent sized metro area, in the "south" according to some people). Most of my friends speak a "default" mid-western accent, but there's plenty of people there who "talk southern".

My family is all from southern Mississippi, though, so I learned to speak in a southern accent growing up... Kind of odd, but I speak in a mid-western accent around friends, at work, or when dealing with people I don't know, but go back to a southern accent when I talk to my family. Makes it really awkward when I'm hanging out with friends and get a phone call from a family member.
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Old 02-15-2015, 09:30 AM
 
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I feel like some college towns are probably losing regional accents like major metros, possibly. However, I have one friend originally from NJ who moved to Auburn, Alabama at a young age and she definitely sounds southern. On the contrary, I have another friend originally from the UK who moved to Chapel Hill, NC at a very young age and his accent sounds neutral. I guess some college towns are more transplant saturated than others, because I'm sure many attract transplants.
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Old 02-16-2015, 10:33 AM
 
Location: Cambridge, MA
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I think most folks speak as they do on TV... That is, white folks (nothing disparaging intended, just saying) seem to mostly speak a similar way--similar to the broad stroke TV personalities.

Last edited by NashCooper; 02-16-2015 at 10:35 AM.. Reason: clarification
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Old 02-16-2015, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Here and there
442 posts, read 381,231 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GunnerTHB View Post
The only people in KC and STL who have southern accents are transplants, just like any other city in the nation. Both cities are Midwestern and not Southern.
My grandma was born and raised in KC and she DEFINITELY had a thick southern accent. As did the few people I met through her over the years.

Quote:
Originally Posted by J'aimeDesVilles View Post
I say "stock" like clock, rock, knock.
I say "stalk" like chalk, walk.
I am originally from Ohio but have lived in Michigan for over twenty years.
I say all of those the same. All rhyme with sock.

Upper midwest, here.
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