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Old 09-19-2007, 09:04 PM
Status: "Happy Halloween!" (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
69,219 posts, read 58,430,059 times
Reputation: 19733
Yes, pop is common here in Colo. My friend from Wyoming says "soda".
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Old 09-19-2007, 09:36 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,746 posts, read 3,254,605 times
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Notice people that pop is not the genuine way to tell if somebody is from the Midwest. Note the exceptions....much of Illinois and Missouri and Wisconsin appear to favor soda. I know soda is especially the genuine term used...i've often heard soda pop used as well. Soda appears to be randomly used everywhere except in the South. What I've noticed especially is Indiana's tendency to pronounce coke FAR more than any other Midwestern state other. The counties in Missouri that use coke don't have very many people living there. I was surprised to see how much more common that term is Indiana than Missouri. Regardless, Indiana is still considered Midwestern in my book, as is most of Missouri.
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Old 09-20-2007, 03:06 PM
 
Location: Madison, WI Metro Area
15,208 posts, read 20,774,739 times
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LOL Indiana has a TON of southern influences compared to almost any state in the Midwest. I think it has to do with a lot of Kentucky people moving north to Indiana over time because of jobs.
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Old 09-20-2007, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Kentucky
6,758 posts, read 14,586,868 times
Reputation: 2022
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plains10 View Post
LOL Indiana has a TON of southern influences compared to almost any state in the Midwest. I think it has to do with a lot of Kentucky people moving north to Indiana over time because of jobs.
Absolutely!
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Old 09-20-2007, 03:47 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,746 posts, read 3,254,605 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Plains10 View Post
LOL Indiana has a TON of southern influences compared to almost any state in the Midwest. I think it has to do with a lot of Kentucky people moving north to Indiana over time because of jobs.
No arguments here. Indiana is far more influenced by Kentucky than most people are willing to acknowledge.
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Old 09-21-2007, 12:07 AM
 
Location: Sarasota, FL; Upstate NY native
217 posts, read 588,665 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
tally--I am a native of upstate NY also (Rochester), now living in the Midwest (MN). I agree with your comments that NY doesn't look or feel like the Midwest. RE: New England influences, I recall from my NYS history that up state was settled by two different groups from 2 different places: the New Englanders settled from the East; Pennsylvanians from the south. There's a small town in the Finger Lakes region called Penn Yan. It's named because it lies approximately on the line where the New England settlers met the Pennsylvania settlers. The parts of the state settled by the two groups definitely have a different look to them as to how the towns are laid out.
You are absoutely correct!

Something more about Pennsylvania. Alot of the Scots-Irish people migrated from the hills and valleys of Pennsylvania to settle the Appalachains. I guess that's why Pennsylvania (especially western PA) and parts of Appalachia (northern WV especially) seem to have some common characteristics.
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Old 09-21-2007, 12:18 AM
 
Location: Sarasota, FL; Upstate NY native
217 posts, read 588,665 times
Reputation: 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plains10 View Post
LOL Indiana has a TON of southern influences compared to almost any state in the Midwest. I think it has to do with a lot of Kentucky people moving north to Indiana over time because of jobs.
But wouldn't native southern Indianians have a southern influence anyway, being so close to Kentucky?
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Old 09-21-2007, 05:13 AM
 
Location: Kentucky
6,758 posts, read 14,586,868 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tallylady46 View Post
But wouldn't native southern Indianians have a southern influence anyway, being so close to Kentucky?
Absolutely!
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Old 05-18-2010, 07:19 PM
 
Location: Garden City, KS
110 posts, read 160,060 times
Reputation: 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
Incorrect. The Midwest officially starts at Ohio, and ends at the western borders of Missouri, Iowa, and Minnesota and at the latitudes the Ohio River is at (extending across an area of roughly U.S. 60 across Missouri). While it's official eastern boundaries are the Michigan/Canada border and the Ohio/Pennsylvania Ohio/West Virginia border...it extends slightly east of these boundaries (in the United States.) Western Pennsylvania and Western New York are more Midwestern than they are Northeastern. Western New York and Northwestern Pennsylvania resemble Northeastern Ohio I'd say more than the Northeast given it is part of the Great Lakes region. these cities seem more Midwestern in attitude, culture, and even speech-pattern-wise they resemble the Upper Midwest more than the Northeast. Geographically, Pennsylvania and New York are located entirely in the Northeast. Culturally they are not as a whole state. Another Midwestern characteristic to Western New York and Northwestern Pennsylvania was that they experienced the Rustbelt full force.
You are also incorrect. The Midwest ends at the western borders of the Dakotas, Nebraska, and Kansas.
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Old 05-18-2010, 07:40 PM
 
Location: CT
1,215 posts, read 1,239,345 times
Reputation: 1963
I think all of NY is solidly northeastern, small difference like accents and different words aside. New England and New Jersey are both different in ways like that, but both are still unquestionably northeastern.
Maybe you could make a case for far western Pennsylvania, but even then, I think it's more closely tied to the northeast.
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