U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-08-2012, 09:22 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,419 posts, read 11,923,391 times
Reputation: 10536

Advertisements

So, I was wondering if people could give examples of smaller cities (say, anything under 200,000), which despite their size have a densely built structure and easily look like they could be neighborhoods within a larger east coast/midwest city.

To qualify, there needs to be something more than a historic brick "Main Street." Instead, the bulk of the residential portion of the city should things like brick rowhouses, rather than detached single-family housing.

Fire away. Pictures welcome.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-09-2012, 01:33 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis
2,331 posts, read 3,054,646 times
Reputation: 3925
Savannah is the first place to come to mind but it is a little over 200,000.

Duluth, Minnesota fits the bill. Technically it's metro is 270,000 but that is because it is in a huge county that also has the Iron Range towns. For all practical purposes the Iron Range is a seperate area. Duluth proper is about 90,000. I made a Duluth photothread a while ago:

Duluth
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-09-2012, 05:18 AM
 
56,600 posts, read 80,890,793 times
Reputation: 12505
Providence immediately comes to mind.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-09-2012, 05:40 AM
 
Location: Springfield and brookline MA
1,243 posts, read 2,519,968 times
Reputation: 1217
Springfield Mass comes to mind,as well as Central Falls Rhode Island.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-09-2012, 07:35 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,419 posts, read 11,923,391 times
Reputation: 10536
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drewcifer View Post
Savannah
Looking online, most of the real estate available looks quite modern and suburban. And filtering for the pre-1900 stuff I don't see much outside the Historic/Victorian districts which I'd really call urban. Admittedly this is more than just a quaint main street, but it hardly seems like the bulk, or even a significant portion of, the city. That said, I know a bunch of outlying exclaves have been annexed by Savannah in recent years, so maybe these give a false picture of the city.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Drewcifer View Post
Duluth, Minnesota
This is exactly what I'm talking about.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Providence
Quote:
Originally Posted by western mass and love it View Post
Springfield Mass
Quote:
Originally Posted by western mass and love it View Post
Rhode Island.
IMHO (as someone who grew up in New England), even old-line urban residential areas in New England don't really have a highly urban feel. Yes, they're built on grids, and were built up before cars, so there is a lack of driveways. They are also fairly dense. However, housing is still detached, and often single-family. I can't think of anywhere outside of parts of Boston where you really see rowhouses, for example.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-09-2012, 09:30 AM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,759,815 times
Reputation: 8803
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post




IMHO (as someone who grew up in New England), even old-line urban residential areas in New England don't really have a highly urban feel. Yes, they're built on grids, and were built up before cars, so there is a lack of driveways. They are also fairly dense. However, housing is still detached, and often single-family. I can't think of anywhere outside of parts of Boston where you really see rowhouses, for example.
So why would you ask for that in a thread? Many small cities don't have rowhouses unless they are somewhere around NYC, Boston, or Philly.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-09-2012, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Lake Arlington Heights, IL
5,481 posts, read 10,399,099 times
Reputation: 2794
Madison, WI.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-09-2012, 10:12 AM
 
56,600 posts, read 80,890,793 times
Reputation: 12505
We have some rowhouses in Syracuse, but that is in certain parts. rowhouses syracuse ny - Google Search

rowhouses syracuse ny - Google Search

Some other urban neighborhoods: little italy syracuse ny - Google Search

little italy syracuse ny - Google Search
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-09-2012, 10:17 AM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,713,305 times
Reputation: 9029
La Crosse, WI

la crosse wi - Google Maps

la crosse wi - Google Maps

la crosse wi - Google Maps

Bloomington, IN

la crosse wi - Google Maps
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-09-2012, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,456 posts, read 7,522,343 times
Reputation: 4344
I think this describes practically every small city in Pennsylvania, especially in the Eastern half. Cities like Allentown, Bethlehem, York, Reading, Lancaster, Easton, Lebanon, Harrisburg, etc. all have very dense urban fabric.

It's extremely common for even fairly small towns throughout Pennsylvania to have rowhouses, as well, as in > 20,000 people. Towns like Bellefonte, Jim Thorpe, Carlisle, West Chester, Lititz are all towns that could easily fit into a much, much larger urban city.

This tends to be very common throughout the Northeast.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top