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Old 06-27-2012, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,440 posts, read 31,751,730 times
Reputation: 15560

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobilee View Post
As far as I know, most of the dialect maps like this are drawn to show the furthest extent to which you will find native-born speakers of a particular dialect. They may be an actual minority when you reach the edge of a particular dialect region, but that is how they are drawn, as far as I understand it.
You are 1000% correct about that.
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Old 06-27-2012, 12:46 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,678 posts, read 23,279,104 times
Reputation: 48876
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Btw anyone seem the film 'Winter's Bone?' It was a pretty good look into life in a rather economically depressed community deep in the Ozarks. Many in the films were actual locals just playing themselves.
LOVED that depressing but engrossing film. I have always had an interest in both regions, and now I actually find myself living in the Appalachians of PA.

I would say that there are similarities, even at this point of the Apps, but I'd say that they weould be stronger in West Va.

Norther MO. is not really the Ozarks. I think that the heart of that culture is in Southern MO and Northern AR, plus states that border these regions.

I've always wanted to visit a church where people handle snakes. There are many in W.Va. I have no interest at all in handling snakes but I'd like to see it, and to interview and get to know these folks.

I'm sure that for obvious reasons, they are less than forth coming about their marginalized faith.
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Old 06-27-2012, 01:30 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
181 posts, read 239,943 times
Reputation: 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobilee View Post
As far as I know, most of the dialect maps like this are drawn to show the furthest extent to which you will find native-born speakers of a particular dialect. They may be an actual minority when you reach the edge of a particular dialect region, but that is how they are drawn, as far as I understand it.
So using that logic, the lines should overlap.
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Old 06-27-2012, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,440 posts, read 31,751,730 times
Reputation: 15560
Quote:
Originally Posted by thepastorsson View Post
So using that logic, the lines should overlap.
Here is a more detailed look at the same map, I am sure you still wont like it.

Here is the site;
American English Dialects
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Old 06-27-2012, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Arkansas
374 posts, read 685,144 times
Reputation: 543
I might just be an old chunk of coal, but I think a map can't tell you everything. I spoke to a native Missourian today that, I promise you, sounded like he could've been from Alabama. He definitely could've been a native here in Arkansas. And I don't mean Southern Mountain; he sounded completely Deep South. I asked him if he was sure he was from Missouri twice. I guess it all just depends on who you talk to. Or maybe I haven't been to the part of Missouri where this guy was from.
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Old 06-27-2012, 02:35 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,440 posts, read 31,751,730 times
Reputation: 15560
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ark90 View Post
I might just be an old chunk of coal, but I think a map can't tell you everything. I spoke to a native Missourian today that, I promise you, sounded like he could've been from Alabama. He definitely could've been a native here in Arkansas. And I don't mean Southern Mountain; he sounded completely Deep South. I asked him if he was sure he was from Missouri twice. I guess it all just depends on who you talk to. Or maybe I haven't been to the part of Missouri where this guy was from.
All of my family that is from Poplar Bluff sound exactly the same as you describe, so does just about everyone else in the bootheel.
Where was the man you spoke to from?
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Old 06-27-2012, 02:54 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
181 posts, read 239,943 times
Reputation: 108
Ah...now THIS map seems much more detailed, and therefore, much more correct.
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Old 06-27-2012, 03:49 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,440 posts, read 31,751,730 times
Reputation: 15560
Quote:
Originally Posted by thepastorsson View Post
Ah...now THIS map seems much more detailed, and therefore, much more correct.
My life is complete now that you approve of a map that is essentially the same as the other.
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Old 06-27-2012, 05:26 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
181 posts, read 239,943 times
Reputation: 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by kshe95girl View Post
My life is complete now that you approve of a map that is essentially the same as the other.
You know, believe it or not, not EVERYTHING is about you, including my opinions of your precious maps, which apparently you drew yourself, judging by your offense at someone daring to not agree with them.

Anywho, whatever. Doesn't matter really, but I simply have a hard time letting uncalled for snide comments slide. Take care!
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Old 06-27-2012, 06:15 PM
 
Location: IN
20,856 posts, read 35,987,118 times
Reputation: 13304
Yes, Ozark and Appalachian culture have similarities.

1) Built environment concentrated in river valleys, streams, and hollows with ridgetops and mountainous areas having few large settlements.
2) Small scale economies that often revolve around mining, wood products industries, light manufacturing, and small colleges.
3) Relative isolation with an often lower grade of roads or roads that are often difficult to navigate.
4) Ancestry is predominantly English, Scots-Irish, Irish, French, Scottish.
5) Rural poverty and lower educational attainment remain key areas of concern.
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