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Old 06-27-2012, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,440 posts, read 31,730,271 times
Reputation: 15560

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Quote:
Originally Posted by thepastorsson View Post
You know, believe it or not, not EVERYTHING is about you, including my opinions of your precious maps, which apparently you drew yourself, judging by your offense at someone daring to not agree with them.

Anywho, whatever. Doesn't matter really, but I simply have a hard time letting uncalled for snide comments slide. Take care!
In case you might have forgotten, you were whining about a section of the dialect map that has nothing to do with the Ozarks.
Try to keep up, you do remember this thread is about the Ozarks, right?
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Old 07-26-2012, 12:42 AM
 
Location: Branson, Missouri
622 posts, read 946,357 times
Reputation: 431
I agree completely with an earlier post about springfield being less mountainous than the regions just to the south. Obviously some people just can't be proven wrong, and dont have any fact to back up their logic...other than some topographical map that doesnt show the true extent of the landscape. They are ON TOP of a plateau, so its quite flat in springfield! I should know as I live in Branson, and travel to Springfield frequently.
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Old 07-29-2012, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Arkansas
1,230 posts, read 2,840,946 times
Reputation: 1551
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
How similar are the cultures from these two mountainous regions, often associated with folky/bluegrass type music, weird independent churches, and of course, the stereotypical log-cabin dwelling, hog-raising, shotgun-toting 'hillbillies'.

Of course their accents sound similar, to me at least...are there any noticeable differences? Is the Ozark accent similar to an Okie or Northern Texas accent? Does it differ appreciably from the 'Cape' of Missouri? Would Branson be a good representative of the accent? Of course Arkansas has a pretty strong mid-west-southern type accent.
I am a native of NW Arkansas which is in the Ozark Mountains. In my case my ancestors and family actually did originate from the Appalachian Mountains and have a very similar accent and culture to those in Appalachia. Here is a video of the Appalachian accent/culture and it is exactly the same thing I have heard all my life by my family and family friends.
Appalachian English - YouTube
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Old 07-29-2012, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Arkansas
1,230 posts, read 2,840,946 times
Reputation: 1551
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ark90 View Post
The oak/hickory thing might be true for the Missouri Ozarks, but in in the Arkansas Ozarks I'd say it's mostly pine. Especially in the foothills in Stone, Izard, and Cleburne counties. There are mountains entirely covered by pine as far as the eye can see. I guess when someone says Ozarks the first thought of most people is Missouri, though.
I know what you are saying people seem to forget or unaware that the Ozarks are in Arkansas too, which has a complete different culture/dialect that that of the Missouri Ozarks IMO.
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Old 07-29-2012, 10:57 PM
 
Location: Branson, Missouri
622 posts, read 946,357 times
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I live around Branson, and we have lots of pine trees. We do have oak and hickory mixed in as well, but there are tons of pines.
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Old 07-31-2012, 09:53 PM
 
Location: IN
20,852 posts, read 35,958,846 times
Reputation: 13297
Quote:
Originally Posted by imbored198824 View Post
I live around Branson, and we have lots of pine trees. We do have oak and hickory mixed in as well, but there are tons of pines.
What variety of pine? Most southern pine varieties include: Loblolly, Slash, etc. White pine is the most highly desired pine overall for wildlife, conservation, and timber value.
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Old 08-03-2012, 11:01 PM
 
Location: Branson, Missouri
622 posts, read 946,357 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
What variety of pine? Most southern pine varieties include: Loblolly, Slash, etc. White pine is the most highly desired pine overall for wildlife, conservation, and timber value.
I have no idea on that, as I am not a tree expert. I just know there are lots of pine trees. Look at a hillside and thats sometimes all you see. The pine trees just don't stop as soon as you cross over the Missouri border. I can drive 30 minutes south, to Harrison, Arkansas....I sure dont notice any difference in trees between here and there.
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Old 08-12-2012, 09:55 PM
 
462 posts, read 582,857 times
Reputation: 396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
How similar are the cultures from these two mountainous regions, often associated with folky/bluegrass type music, weird independent churches, and of course, the stereotypical log-cabin dwelling, hog-raising, shotgun-toting 'hillbillies'.

Of course their accents sound similar, to me at least...are there any noticeable differences? Is the Ozark accent similar to an Okie or Northern Texas accent? Does it differ appreciably from the 'Cape' of Missouri? Would Branson be a good representative of the accent? Of course Arkansas has a pretty strong mid-west-southern type accent.
They are the same culture basically. Both are heavily Scots-Irish. That's where the "hillbilly" culture comes from mostly. Just look at the areas of the United States ancestry map that report "American" and its pretty much always Scots-Irish. There is good reason for this. Scots-Irish were warriors that were pesky in the border country of England and Scotland, and sent off to Northern Ireland, where they weren't wanted either. Having no country of their own anymore, they moved to Pennsylvania. The Quakers didn't get along well with them so they moved up to the Appalachian highlands and constantly defined the western frontiers of America. Read American Nations or Albion's Seed. There's more detail about this culture culture there. There was also a History Channel documentary called "Hillbilly: The Real Story".

Even the famous Appalachian TV family and the most successful real life Ozark have the same last name - Walton...
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Old 01-20-2013, 10:19 PM
 
Location: Branson, Missouri
622 posts, read 946,357 times
Reputation: 431
Quote:
Originally Posted by thepastorsson View Post
You know, believe it or not, not EVERYTHING is about you, including my opinions of your precious maps, which apparently you drew yourself, judging by your offense at someone daring to not agree with them.

Anywho, whatever. Doesn't matter really, but I simply have a hard time letting uncalled for snide comments slide. Take care!
Don't let her get to you, she is like that to everyone. I hope she doesn't treat people like this in real life....she probably just uses her computer to act like a very rude "I know everything", kind of person though.
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Old 01-20-2013, 10:28 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,135 posts, read 21,888,823 times
Reputation: 23217
We visited Fairfield Bay and were impressed with the way things there were so like the mountains of North Carolina. We felt right at home and had a wonderful time. We also discussed if maybe there was a time when the two mountain areas might have been side by side and some happening caused them to separate.

We found people in the area to be independent, friendly, hard-working, conservative with dress and manners and the list goes on and on. Wonderful people.

The people in the Eastern part of North Carolina and Low Country of South Carolina have more of a plantation type accent which is more drawn out and doesn't leave off the y's of their words as much. Many of the plantation children were raised by black nannies and to me have a black dialect type accent that is a little more refined from being with their parents too, but still has the black dialect sound to it.

Last edited by NCN; 01-20-2013 at 10:38 PM..
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