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Old 02-21-2015, 10:48 PM
 
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I think it seems very similar. I'm sure it has its own twist, but I would say Appalachia is a belt spanning from eastern Oklahoma eastward to the Great Smokies and then it turns northward and encompasses most of Pennsylvania and New York.
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Old 02-22-2015, 07:53 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
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I'm very familiar with both the Appalachians and the Ozarks and I think they are both very similar. There are some differences in dialect though - and I also think that the Ozarks in general feel more remote and isolated and less populated - definitely less traveled by tourists.

Both mountain ranges are gorgeous.
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Old 02-22-2015, 08:17 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
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Originally Posted by Hamtonfordbury View Post
They are the same culture basically. Both are heavily Scots-Irish. That's where the "hillbilly" culture comes from mostly. Just look at the areas of the United States ancestry map that report "American" and its pretty much always Scots-Irish. There is good reason for this. Scots-Irish were warriors that were pesky in the border country of England and Scotland, and sent off to Northern Ireland, where they weren't wanted either. Having no country of their own anymore, they moved to Pennsylvania. The Quakers didn't get along well with them so they moved up to the Appalachian highlands and constantly defined the western frontiers of America. Read American Nations or Albion's Seed. There's more detail about this culture culture there. There was also a History Channel documentary called "Hillbilly: The Real Story".

Even the famous Appalachian TV family and the most successful real life Ozark have the same last name - Walton...
Wow, this reads like my family history!

My ancestors came from northern England and the Scots/English border (Scottish Lowlands). They moved here from that region to PA in the late 1600s and early 1700s. When SC was the "wilderness" they moved there in the mid 1700s. When Arkansas was the "wild west" they moved there in the mid 1800s (as well as to Texas).

I'll tell you what was really an eye opener. Last year my husband and I visited northern England up by the Scots border. What blew my mind is that the FOOD was nearly identical to the food my grandmother used to make, which we thought was just plain old "country cooking." Also, the people were similar - not in their accent of course but just in a sense of "country," and "friendly" and even the way they looked and carried themselves. (My DNA testing shows that I am 98 percent Northern European with about 70 percent of that coming from northern England, Scotland and Ireland, so that makes sense!)

Just goes to show you how deep some traditions run.
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Old 02-22-2015, 12:04 PM
 
Location: Branson, Missouri
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90% of the settlers of the Ozarks were from Tennessee/Virginia/Kentucky. It gives the Ozarks of Arkansas and Missouri a unique culture from the rest of the state. I would say the Ozarks of Arkansas and Missouri are more similar to each other than they are to any other part of the actual state they are in. For instance...branson mo is much more similar to Harrison Arkansas than it is to St. Louis, mo. Just like Harrison is much more similar to Branson than it is to little rock. As far as dialect it depends where you are in the Ozarks. I am from Branson and visited pigeon forge/gatlinburg tn. It almost felt like I hadn't left home....and it's over a 10 hour drive!! I would also say the Ozarks are more southern than Midwestern overall...that's for sure. Most people in the ozarks before identifying one of these would first identify themselves as from the Ozarks. I think that is an interesting thought and I don't know if many other places are like that. Say for instance the weather as bad outside. Most people around here wouldn't say "only in the south" or "only in the midwest". They would comment on this "damn Ozarks weather"!
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Old 02-23-2015, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Fayetteville, Arkansas via ATX
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Whoever posted that its like the Appalachians meet the West is correct in my book. The Ozarks aren't as extreme as say West Virginia, and you see a cattle ranch around every corner where it is flat enough. You even see them where it isn't flat enough. There are parts of the Ozarks just west of town where you'll see cows on really steep rolling hillsides, which makes me think of a scene out of Switzerland or something.

No coal mines or any of that stuff in the Ozarks, and the geology is limestone karst, similar to the Balcones in the Texas Hill Country. Makes for clear lakes and rivers.

Lots of back and forth between the populations of the Ozarks and the Southwest. Every second or third car here seems like it has Texas plates.
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Old 02-23-2015, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
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Originally Posted by Rock Climber View Post
Whoever posted that its like the Appalachians meet the West is correct in my book. The Ozarks aren't as extreme as say West Virginia, and you see a cattle ranch around every corner where it is flat enough. You even see them where it isn't flat enough. There are parts of the Ozarks just west of town where you'll see cows on really steep rolling hillsides, which makes me think of a scene out of Switzerland or something.

No coal mines or any of that stuff in the Ozarks, and the geology is limestone karst, similar to the Balcones in the Texas Hill Country. Makes for clear lakes and rivers.

Lots of back and forth between the populations of the Ozarks and the Southwest. Every second or third car here seems like it has Texas plates.
You might have seen my Texas plates up in them thar hills! We're from east Texas though and east Texas is more southern than southwestern culturally.

You make a lot of good points about things like coalmines. However, I've spent a lot of time in the Appalachians and they seem very similar to the Ozarks to me culturally. Of course, not identical, but very similar. Much of the southern Appalachians don't really have much of a coal industry, and I've seen lots of cattle perched on the side of a hill in the Appalachians.

I think the fact that the same demographics (as far as ancestry goes) basically populated both regions brings a lot of similarity to them.

But the thing that really struck me as different is something you pointed out yourself - the extreme clarity of the lakes and rivers of the Ozarks. Really, really special and beautiful. The Ozarks are a national treasure and I love that they're not overrun with tourists.
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Old 11-24-2015, 05:56 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Marat View Post
Yes, really. That map seems very deceptive to me. From looking at it, you would think Springfield would be very hilly or even mountainous. In reality, it is a rolling plain. Aurora and Ava look more impressive on the map than the area around Branson when in reality just the opposite is true. I've been all over southern MO. That is a very flattering map. Driving over the northwestern third of AR is much more impressive and beautiful.

As far as lakes, well that is subjective like everything else.

MO
Lake of the Ozarks
Table Rock
Stockton
Pomme de Terre
Truman
Taneycomo (?) just a stopped up river but they call it a lake

AR
Bull Shoals
Norfork
Beaver
Greers Ferry
Sequoyah (small but if we are counting Taneycomo...)

It's not like MO dominates in the lakes. Again, MO's best lake is Table Rock and it's pressed right against AR. Scenery wise, the Buffalo River > any of these lakes.
The Ozarks is an old eroded plateau which makes the topography somewhat different than you would expect in a hilly/mountainous area.
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Old 09-05-2016, 10:33 AM
 
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I was born and raised and lived 30 years in Pope Co. Ark. Mover to Laurel Co. Ky, have lived here 30 years. Very little difference in Ozark and Appalachian culture. Mostly just a few words. The man from the Ozarks fit right in, in Eastern Ky. The words and speech are very similar. The customs are the same.
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Old 09-05-2016, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Ohio, USA
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I used to think the Ozarks were part of the Appalicha before reading about them.
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