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Old 06-25-2012, 01:31 PM
 
Location: Michigan
2,842 posts, read 2,252,123 times
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Yea, I'm a bit confused on what the OP wanted. His link was of some trees so that's what I assumed.

Does an inner city residential development count?

Google Maps
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Old 06-25-2012, 01:40 PM
Status: "Movin' on up" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: New Orleans
2,178 posts, read 1,758,664 times
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Because of the many water features in the New Orleans area, development has been confined to a fairly compact area. This, however, is within walking distance of where Mike Ditka lived when he coached the Saints:

patterson road new orleans, la - Google Maps
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Old 06-25-2012, 01:42 PM
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
25,269 posts, read 11,781,250 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by animatedmartian View Post
Yea, I'm a bit confused on what the OP wanted. His link was of some trees so that's what I assumed.

Does an inner city residential development count?

Google Maps
Neat! Does that count as mid-century modern? I don't usually like modern, but those townhouses (and tower) look elegant. Found an article about them.

Mies van der Rohe, Lafayette Park - Homes - Dwell

Dunno what the OP had in mind, but I doubt they count as "least urban". Are those fields in other Detroit views places that were abandoded and the houses torn down? Or just spots that never got built on?
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Old 06-25-2012, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Michigan
2,842 posts, read 2,252,123 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Neat! Does that count as mid-century modern? I don't usually like modern, but those townhouses (and tower) look elegant. Found an article about them.

Mies van der Rohe, Lafayette Park - Homes - Dwell

Dunno what the OP had in mind, but I doubt they count as "least urban". Are those fields in other Detroit views places that were abandoded and the houses torn down? Or just spots that never got built on?
They were from urban decay. Most everywhere within the city limits (except the park lands) has been developed.

Last edited by animatedmartian; 06-25-2012 at 02:03 PM..
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Old 06-25-2012, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Phoenix Arizona
1,788 posts, read 1,701,504 times
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Ok, my last two were in mountain parks so i'll do some neighborhoods. They're near mountain parks, but we have a lot of them here. Plus, I think the desert definition of rural might not fit the farm and barn look elsewhere.

I cut through this neighborhood pretty often.
https://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&l...63.77,,0,-1.46

https://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&l...,66.26,,0,8.37

Those last two were in/near the Sunnyslope neighborhood in Central Phoenix a few miles from downtown.

This one is an older kinda rundown neighborhood off Cave Creek Rd. on the way to North Phoenix. It's full of hilly streets that are fun to cruise around in.

https://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&l...,284.34,,0,4.2
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Old 06-25-2012, 02:34 PM
 
6,372 posts, read 4,142,268 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by animatedmartian View Post
They were from urban decay. Most everywhere within the city limits (except the park lands) has been developed.
Yes.

Detroit was once the 4th largest city in the country with just short of 2 million people.

Note the streetlights and sidewalks in the images (and how the streets are on a grid).

It's just that no other city besides Detroit has decayed to the point where large swaths of the city have reverted back to farm/rural land.
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Old 06-25-2012, 04:51 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,937 posts, read 5,054,529 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CowanStern View Post
There two street views in downtown Houston, Texas, are less than a half mile apart:


https://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&l...98,,0,5.3&z=16

https://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&l...,0,-13.56&z=15
That first one isn't downtown but east of DT, along the bayou.
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Old 06-25-2012, 07:01 PM
 
Location: Michigan
2,842 posts, read 2,252,123 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 313Weather View Post
Yes.

Detroit was once the 4th largest city in the country with just short of 2 million people.

Note the streetlights and sidewalks in the images (and how the streets are on a grid).

It's just that no other city besides Detroit has decayed to the point where large swaths of the city have reverted back to farm/rural land.
Though I wouldn't say the process is unique to Detroit. Here's a plot of land in Chicago's South Loop. It looks like a former industrial site.

Chicago, IL - Google Maps

Cleveland has a similar area.

Cleveland, OH - Google Maps

And just so we aren't only picking on Rust Belt cities...

Dallas, TX - Google Maps

Though that's assuming "least urban" also means least amount of development and not necessarily "suburban" or park land development. Though I will say what makes Detroit unique is the amount of space that has "de-urbanized" (I like that word) and that a large number of vacant building haven't been demolished yet. Most other cities have kept blight to a minimal.
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Old 06-25-2012, 08:51 PM
 
1,298 posts, read 731,410 times
Reputation: 787
I think Pittsburgh wins this, there are numerous streets throughout the city that for long expanses you will see nothing but trees.

The ones below are all within 1 mile of the CBD:

East:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Pitts...48451336700728

South:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Pitts...21409131833366

West:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Pitts...71746943499383

North:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Pitts...49521793292055


And this is in the center:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Pitts...76248131556713

Last edited by airwave09; 06-25-2012 at 09:00 PM..
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Old 06-25-2012, 09:39 PM
 
1,108 posts, read 784,927 times
Reputation: 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by animatedmartian View Post
Yea, I'm a bit confused on what the OP wanted. His link was of some trees so that's what I assumed.

Does an inner city residential development count?

Google Maps
True, there were trees in that link, but the interesting part to me is the sprawly, industrial development on the other side. Just looks nothing like what I picture NYC to be.
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