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Old 07-02-2012, 01:59 AM
 
Location: Kansas City, MO
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This is purely anecdotal, but it seems small and regional chains ARE more prevalent in the South, and thus better able to survive there. Quite frankly, I do think of small and regional chains as 'small businesses' as compared to mega-corporations, often world-wide chains. Small and regional chains - whether they be restaurants, grocery stores, or other businesses - also seem to be more locally loyal and often are headquartered in small towns with stockholders and investers being in the same region. This is interesting to think about because it's counterintuitive to common rhetoric. In the North, mega-corporations seem to have a larger share of the market.
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Old 07-02-2012, 03:23 AM
 
Location: Michigan
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If they survive, don't they typically expand into more markets? Mega-corporations start off somewhere.
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Old 07-02-2012, 04:17 AM
 
Location: Kansas City, MO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by animatedmartian View Post
If they survive, don't they typically expand into more markets? Mega-corporations start off somewhere.
No, there are a lot of successful regional chains that aren't mega-corporations and all encompassing. Braum's, Shoney's, Sirloin Stockade, Taco Tico, Mazzio's, and Whataburger are some examples. There just seems to be more of these places in the South.
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Old 07-02-2012, 06:51 AM
 
Location: Somewhere extremely awesome
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MOKAN View Post
No, there are a lot of successful regional chains that aren't mega-corporations and all encompassing. Braum's, Shoney's, Sirloin Stockade, Taco Tico, Mazzio's, and Whataburger are some examples. There just seems to be more of these places in the South.
I don't know about Kansas City, but there are a lot of successful regional chains in other parts of the Northeast, Midwest, and West as well. You probably just aren't familiar with them.
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Old 07-02-2012, 10:35 AM
 
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Originally Posted by cbmsu01 View Post
I don't know about Kansas City, but there are a lot of successful regional chains in other parts of the Northeast, Midwest, and West as well. You probably just aren't familiar with them.
^^^ Exactly, it's not a Southern phenomenon.
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Old 07-02-2012, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Kansas City, MO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cbmsu01 View Post
I don't know about Kansas City, but there are a lot of successful regional chains in other parts of the Northeast, Midwest, and West as well. You probably just aren't familiar with them.
That's possible. Can you name some? I know the midwest has Checkers/Rally's.

Kansas City has a few small chains, but they don't go beyond the immediate metro.
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Old 07-02-2012, 07:17 PM
 
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I guess the question is, what are the parameters for what makes something "regional". For example, Whataburger was mentioned (which I love, by the way). But it stretches from Oklahoma through Texas and all the way east from there. Is OK considered "South?" There are a lot of regional grocery store chains. In the MidWest, you have HyVee. In Colorado, there's also Kings. In Alabama, there's Publix. As for fast food, there's good old In & Out in CA and NV, but it's now expanded further west and south. Carl's Jr./Hardee's are the same company, but called different things depending on where you are in the country. There's also a company called Mellow Mushroom (pizza). Mainly prevalent in the Southeast, but there's an outlier location in Denver. Nebraska is known for Runza (a fast food place that serves what looks like rolls, but they are actually filled with meat. Little hard to describe), but I don't think it extends out of the state. Donut shops are another good example. In the south, people prefer Krispy Kreme. Northeast coast prefers Dunkin Donuts. Midwest also has Lamars. Not saying if you're from one area or another you MUST love that certain donut shop and also not saying that there are ONLY that donut shop in the area, again, just the most prevalent or where it began.
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Old 07-02-2012, 10:43 PM
 
Location: Michigan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MOKAN View Post
That's possible. Can you name some? I know the midwest has Checkers/Rally's.

Kansas City has a few small chains, but they don't go beyond the immediate metro.
Here in Michigan, we have Meijers, ABC warehouse, Art Van, Happy's Pizza, Coney Island, Tim Hortons, and more recently, a growth of Culiver's. Though Tim Hortons is a Canadian brand but happens to be only regional in the North US.

There's probably a few more, but those are what come to mind first.
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Old 07-03-2012, 12:26 AM
 
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H-E-B, Publix, Harris Teeter, Food Lion, Checkers, Bojangles, Cookout, Fuddruckers, Whataburger, Miami SUBS(although it's a subsidiary of Nathan's), Waffle House.
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Old 07-03-2012, 05:42 AM
 
Location: Kansas City, MO
3,572 posts, read 6,198,795 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BarsofClay View Post
I guess the question is, what are the parameters for what makes something "regional". For example, Whataburger was mentioned (which I love, by the way). But it stretches from Oklahoma through Texas and all the way east from there. Is OK considered "South?" There are a lot of regional grocery store chains. In the MidWest, you have HyVee. In Colorado, there's also Kings. In Alabama, there's Publix. As for fast food, there's good old In & Out in CA and NV, but it's now expanded further west and south. Carl's Jr./Hardee's are the same company, but called different things depending on where you are in the country. There's also a company called Mellow Mushroom (pizza). Mainly prevalent in the Southeast, but there's an outlier location in Denver. Nebraska is known for Runza (a fast food place that serves what looks like rolls, but they are actually filled with meat. Little hard to describe), but I don't think it extends out of the state. Donut shops are another good example. In the south, people prefer Krispy Kreme. Northeast coast prefers Dunkin Donuts. Midwest also has Lamars. Not saying if you're from one area or another you MUST love that certain donut shop and also not saying that there are ONLY that donut shop in the area, again, just the most prevalent or where it began.
I think regional grocery stores exist everywhere, thankfully. While I like Whole Foods for a few things, I do more than 95% of my grocery shopping at locally-owned stores with a locally-owned co-op distrubution system.

Regional? Well, chains that are unique to a region, even if a bit widespread, but that are not absolutely ubiquitous and mega-corporate/world-wide. El Pollo Loco, which I've heard of, may be such a chain in California (and other states?).

While Hardee's/Carl's Jr isn't quite like McDonald's and Burger King, I'm thinking it's too big and widespread to be what I'm thinking of.
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