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View Poll Results: What part of the US has the worst weather?
the Northeast 51 11.92%
the Midwest 150 35.05%
the South 127 29.67%
the Rockies 10 2.34%
the Southwest 42 9.81%
the Pacific Northwest 33 7.71%
California 15 3.50%
Voters: 428. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-15-2013, 08:39 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,326,666 times
Reputation: 4270

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Quote:
Originally Posted by IEnjoyBeer View Post
Why are people putting the Midwest above the Northeast?

The Northeast gets everything the Midwest does but also Nor'easters, hurricanes and lake effect snow (Upstate NY).

Upstate NY gets my vote for the worst weather region in the entire country.

You name it, Upstate NY gets it.

Thunderstorms, hurricanes, Nor'easters, endless lake effect snow, tornadoes, ice storms, hail, freezing rain, extreme humidity, heat spells, cold spells, negative wind chills, etc. etc. etc.

It even gets earthquakes, albeit small ones.

All of these can and do happen within one calendar year.

The Midwest doesnt get Nor'easters, hurricanes and only Michigan really gets lake effect snow (save for NE Ohio).

I dont think people realize how much snow actually falls in Upstate NY. 100+ inches are the average. There are no Midwestern ciites that average over half that.
You act as if snow is the most severe weather event in the country. What about severe cold, tornadoes, drought, heat, etc? The Midwest is worse on just about all levels than the temperate Northeast, which is part of what makes the Northeast so livable.
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Old 04-15-2013, 08:47 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,326,666 times
Reputation: 4270
Quote:
Originally Posted by RC01 View Post
Minnesota and Wisconsin get significantly colder which is why people think it is worse. Most of the Midwest isn't too bad, but Minnesota and Wisconsin give it that "cold" reputation. Some people just can't handle the cold.
Dont forget the UP of Michigan!

Even Chicago is significantly colder than NYC during the winter (not that either city are extremely cold). Anymore these days, even Minneapolis, Milwaukee, Chicago and Detroit aren't nearly as cold as they used to be and are, for the most part, mild compared to their historical averages and are not even remotely "arctic" by those standards (as people like to label them). That being said, those four cities can actually enjoy some outdoor winter activities, unlike its Northeastern bretheren, which to me makes those areas more livable for that time of the year. Couple that with very similar Springs, Autumns and Summers, and I think the Midwest weather is preferable to the Northeasts (if you're an outdoorsy person and live in major cities).
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Old 04-15-2013, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,798 posts, read 19,043,001 times
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Upper midwest, mainly Minnesota, the Dakotas, and Wisconsin...and part of Iowa..sometimes part of Illinois. Bipolar is one way to describe it and extreme at least in a few of these areas can be another way to describe it, although all these states are great in the summer even if they have extreme storms all the time.

I've lived/spent time in most areas of the US and this is by far, year round, the worst. Part of the NE is bad in the winter because of the amount of snow, but overall if you count year round, I think midwest is worse. The bipolar crap doesn't help either. I love how it can be 80 one day and 30 the next in the early-ish spring.
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Old 04-15-2013, 09:17 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,326,666 times
Reputation: 4270
April to November is fine, it's December through February and parts of March that are difficult. The hottest summertime temps in the states you listed (MN, ND/SD, WI, IA, IL) are for the most part lower than 90 degrees on avg. for a July high temp (Southern IL and parts of SD may be over). Spring and Fall are usually pleasant from as early as mid March to as late as late October/early November. But like I said before, the fact that there is ice and snow on the ground for weeks/months on end in the wintertime make winters actually MORE tolerable than cities where it's cold but not snowy/icy. I've lived in both scenarios and this is my takeaway.
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Old 04-15-2013, 09:32 PM
 
Location: New York
541 posts, read 763,310 times
Reputation: 262
Quote:
Originally Posted by RC01 View Post
Minnesota and Wisconsin get significantly colder which is why people think it is worse. Most of the Midwest isn't too bad, but Minnesota and Wisconsin give it that "cold" reputation. Some people just can't handle the cold.


No, they dont.


Upstate NY, Vermont and Maine get just as cold as Minnesota does. You need to get out more.


http://www.gadling.com/2012/01/26/me...es-in-america/


http://www.currentresults.com/Weathe...US/coldest.php
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Old 04-15-2013, 09:37 PM
 
Location: New York
541 posts, read 763,310 times
Reputation: 262
Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
You act as if snow is the most severe weather event in the country. What about severe cold, tornadoes, drought, heat, etc? The Midwest is worse on just about all levels than the temperate Northeast, which is part of what makes the Northeast so livable.


Once again, Upstate NY, Vermont and Maine are in the Northeast.


All of which get severe cold, tornadoes, drought and heat spells. This **** happened as recently as last summer.


You need to stop thinking that all of the Northeast is temperate NYC.
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Old 04-15-2013, 09:43 PM
 
Location: New York
541 posts, read 763,310 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
Upper midwest, mainly Minnesota, the Dakotas, and Wisconsin...and part of Iowa..sometimes part of Illinois. Bipolar is one way to describe it and extreme at least in a few of these areas can be another way to describe it, although all these states are great in the summer even if they have extreme storms all the time.

I've lived/spent time in most areas of the US and this is by far, year round, the worst. Part of the NE is bad in the winter because of the amount of snow, but overall if you count year round, I think midwest is worse. The bipolar crap doesn't help either. I love how it can be 80 one day and 30 the next in the early-ish spring.

The average lows are in the teens in many places of Upstate NY, Maine and Vermont just as they are in Minnesota and Wisconsin.
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Old 04-15-2013, 09:48 PM
 
Location: New York
541 posts, read 763,310 times
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Old Forge, NY (which I have been to many times as part of "going up North") averages -48 for record low.

International Falls, MN averages -55 for record low.

Old Forge, New York - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

International Falls, Minnesota - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Old Forge also averages 194 inches of snow. Intl Falls averages 72 inches.


You fellas need to realize that the winter weather in the Midwest is also present in the upper parts of the Northeast, namely the places I have been talking about: Upstate NY, Vermont, Maine and also New Hampshire.

It gets just as ****ing cold, and because we are EAST of the Great Lakes, we get much more clouds, rain and snow.

It is much sunnier in the Upper Plains than the Great Lakes region. Much sunnier.


Im not trying to say its colder, im simply helping you realize that the Upper Plains isnt the only part with frigid temperatures on a consistent basis. IMO, because of the presence of more snow (considerably), as well as more clouds and precipitation in general, and it getting just as cold and frigid, the Northeast is the worst. Theres more to the Northeast than just NYC, Boston and Philly fellas.

Why dont you ask people in Harford, Portland, Burlington, Albany, Utica, Syracuse, Rochester, Binghamton, Buffalo, Watertown, etc. how cold it gets in the winter.

These regions also get the heat and humidity as well as tornadoes, Nor'easters, hurricanes, thunderstorms, hail, ice storms, etc. etc.
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Old 04-15-2013, 10:02 PM
 
Location: New York
541 posts, read 763,310 times
Reputation: 262
To go further..


Record high for the year:

Old Forge - 94
Intl Falls - 104

Average high for the year:

Old Forge - 51
Intl Falls - 49

Average low for the year:

Old Forge - 30
Intl Falls - 27

Record low for the year:

Old Forge - -48
Intl Falls - -55

Precipitation:

Old Forge - 50 inches
Intl Falls - 24 inches

Snowfall

Old Forge - 194 inches
Intl Falls - 72 inches


Thats the coldest city in the continential US compared to the coldest part of New York. Looks pretty damn similar temperature wise, while its much cloudier, rainier and snowier.

More to weather than just temperatures. Not even factoring hurricanes, Nor'easters, etc. of which are a result of geographical location. Upper Northeast is sandwiched between the Great Lakes and Atlantic Ocean, which are storm brewers, unlike the Upper Plains.

Do I bother getting Vermont and Maine stats?


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Old 04-15-2013, 10:21 PM
 
Location: New York
541 posts, read 763,310 times
Reputation: 262
Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
I've lived/spent time in most areas of the US and this is by far, year round, the worst. Part of the NE is bad in the winter because of the amount of snow, but overall if you count year round, I think midwest is worse. The bipolar crap doesn't help either. I love how it can be 80 one day and 30 the next in the early-ish spring.

It was in the 30s and snowing last week, now its in the 70s this week.


I get it, if its not happening in NYC, then its not happening at all in the Northeast.

Thats pretty much all the voting indicates. Exposure levels.
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