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Old 07-07-2012, 06:59 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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I was thinking of how when people think 'Texas' they automatically think barren, arid, deserts, sage bush grasslands, wide open plains, ranches, cowboys, Spanish/Mexican culture, largely from old Western movies and other stereotypes, but when I actually visited Texas, I realized most of Texas was actually tilled farmland, a lot of it is actually very green.etc. I.e. the stereotypical Texas only applies to southern and western Texas.

Montana is also seen as being pretty mountainous, but most of it is in fact the Great Plains. Also, much of Nevada is actually a pretty cold place. What other examples can you think of?
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Old 07-07-2012, 07:16 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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Kansas is not nearly as flat at Illinois, southern Michigan, Florida, the Texas coastal plain.

Reference to Montana above, New Mexico is probably more mountainous and less flat than Montana is.

Less than half of Louisiana is Cajun country and bayous. Most of it is just like Mississippi, Arkansas and Texas.
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Old 07-07-2012, 07:32 AM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
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Nearly half of Oregon is desert or close to it.
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Old 07-07-2012, 07:34 AM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post

Reference to Montana above, New Mexico is probably more mountainous and less flat than Montana is.
Hmmm, I'd say it's about a draw. Eastern Montana is prairie yes, but it's nothing like Iowa. It's more in line with Alberta, the Dakotas, western Nebraska, with a touch of Wyoming. There are island mountain ranges, very deep river canyons, and pockets of forest, it's actually beautiful country. I love eastern Montana!

Not to bash on Iowa to mention, I was impressed with how green, hilly and beautiful Iowa is.
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Old 07-07-2012, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Atlanta & NYC
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New York State isn't one massive city.
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Old 07-07-2012, 09:37 AM
 
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Colorado isn't all mountains

Sent from my AT&T Samsung Galaxy Note
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Old 07-07-2012, 09:41 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,438,578 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by a bag of it View Post
Colorado isn't all mountains

Sent from my AT&T Samsung Galaxy Note
Yes but it's still MOSTLY mountains, isn't it?
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Old 07-07-2012, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma
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Probably less than 25% of the land in Oklahoma is actually "flat".

About 10 years ago, Oklahoma was playing Mississippi State in basketball. Mississippi State's star player had gone to Junior College at Eastern Oklahoma State College in Wilburton, OK.

One announcer asked, "I wonder what Wilburton, Oklahoma is like."

To which the other announcer said "Probably flat."

Guess what the teams are called at Eastern Oklahoma State College?

The Eastern Oklahoma State College MOUNTAINEERS.
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Old 07-07-2012, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ja1myn View Post
New York State isn't one massive city.
Just about to say that one. Certainly Metro NYC accounts for the vast majority of NY's populace, but geographically, it's probably no more than 15% of the state.
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Old 07-07-2012, 09:49 AM
 
Location: West Tennessee
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Flat, Irrigated rice & cotton fields in the Missouri Bootheel

Rice fields in far Southern Illinois, as well as cypress swamps and the hilly Shawnee National Forest.
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