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View Poll Results: Which do Midwesterners seem more like?
Northeasterners 90 56.60%
Southerners 69 43.40%
Voters: 159. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-12-2012, 12:05 PM
 
Location: The Conterminous United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bradjl2009 View Post
My friend's husband even refers to Ohio as more of the East Coast, but he's from California which makes some sense.
Out of all the Midwestern states, I think Ohio is the one that stands out as being very different, even from the other Midwestern states.
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Old 07-12-2012, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
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Cities are more northeastern while out in the country its more southern.
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Old 07-12-2012, 06:37 PM
 
Location: Missouri
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I'm from the Sullivan area in Missouri and I have nothing in common with people from the NE. Whenever I travel south I feel a lot more at home than when I travel to northern states, and they're culture is very different than my own. My extended family lives mainly in the south with most of my immediate family living in Bollinger county Missouri and other surrounding counties. Whenever I go to visit them I can guarantee there is NOTHING northeastern about that area, or my area.
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Old 07-12-2012, 06:53 PM
 
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Midwest is such a odd mix and so culturally unique all i can say is that midwest seems like a transtion between the northeast and south and even that is not accurate. It has its own culture.
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Old 07-12-2012, 06:56 PM
 
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Quote:
I'm from the Sullivan area in Missouri and I have nothing in common with people from the NE. Whenever I travel south I feel a lot more at home than when I travel to northern states, and they're culture is very different than my own. My extended family lives mainly in the south with most of my immediate family living in Bollinger county Missouri and other surrounding counties. Whenever I go to visit them I can guarantee there is NOTHING northeastern about that area, or my area.
You cant generalize the Midwest when you live in the southern fringes of the Midwest. Yes the fringes that border the southern states are DEFINITELY southern with a few differences. but the same is for the parts of the Midwest that border the western states( Montana, Wyoming, Colorado) or the Eastern states (New York, Pennsylvania. The Midwest is cultural mix
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Old 07-12-2012, 07:04 PM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBeagleLady View Post
Yes, that is how I view it as well. It always amazes me how different it is on either side of the river. There's not really anything Midwestern about Rapid City.
I've always imagined Rapid City to feel a bit like Billings, and Pierre like Great Falls. Would you say that's accurate?
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Old 07-12-2012, 07:06 PM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
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How unified do you think of the Midwest as being? Would you say there is an overall commonality between say, Fargo and Akron?
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Old 07-12-2012, 08:41 PM
 
Location: West Tennessee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2ForTheSea View Post
In the part of the Midwest where I grew up (Southeast MO), Midwesterners seemed a lot more like Southerners. Even down to the accent for a lot of people. Some people sounded so Southern you would think they grew up in South Arkansas or Louisiana while their neighbors may have had the typical flat Midwestern accent.
Now I live in South Florida along with a massive amount of Northeasterners and I'm positive Midwesterners are NOT at all like the Northeasterners that live here.
This is 100% true. Born and raised in SE Missouri and the two cultures and accents can change in literally a matter of miles, even in rural areas.

As for the OP, the Midwest has a unique history. It's not a blend, it is it's own thing. I grew up on the line between the midwest and south. I would say I lean southern in almost every way but I know plenty of natives around here that certainly do not. Cities in the Midwest and rural areas in the Midwest are different enough, and not just because of the urban/rural divide. The immigration was much more varied in the cities while much of the rural Midwest was primarily Germans as well as Scandinavians in the far north. The southern fringes of the Midwest, mainly in Missouri & Indiana, have significant English/Scotch-Irish/Welsh ancestry. However, many of the counties that have significant amounts of those ancestries aren't usually considered part of the Midwest anyway.

Basically, most of the Midwest is unique enough that it is.....Midwestern.
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Old 07-12-2012, 09:06 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by callmemaybe View Post
How unified do you think of the Midwest as being? Would you say there is an overall commonality between say, Fargo and Akron?

No more than there is between Pittsburg and Boston, or Richmond Va and Tulsa Ok. Each region varies greatly from one end of it to another. Fargo and Akron are quite different, but they are both in states lumped together as the midwest. The midwest states share some comonality and that is why they are lumped together. No different than other regions, no one region really shares a homogenous culture. It varies by state, and even by parts of states.
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Old 07-13-2012, 01:48 AM
 
Location: E ND & NW MN
4,806 posts, read 9,427,662 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by callmemaybe View Post
How unified do you think of the Midwest as being? Would you say there is an overall commonality between say, Fargo and Akron?
As someone who lives near Fargo (a bit north of the city).....I would say we would see Akron as part of the Great Lakes industrial area and tied to factories. Here our livelihood is still tied to the land.

Now people are people everywhere...you have nice folks in both places....
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