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Old 07-14-2012, 07:24 PM
 
Location: Shaw.
2,226 posts, read 3,142,569 times
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There have actually been a lot of studies on dialects of American English, especially the Philadelphia accent. This is because UPenn has done a lot of research about this. I can post some about it, if you like.
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Old 07-14-2012, 09:25 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,005 posts, read 54,523,130 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
There have actually been a lot of studies on dialects of American English, especially the Philadelphia accent. This is because UPenn has done a lot of research about this. I can post some about it, if you like.
Sure!

I am always interested in this stuff.
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Old 07-15-2012, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Floribama
14,962 posts, read 31,357,878 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
It's funny that we can sometimes have such different pronounciations. A friend and I were talking about the thread on the Writing forum where those of us who care about such things smack our foreheads over misused words and phrases. My friend said one that drives her nuts is on real estate sites--people use the term "rod iron" instead of "wrought iron". I was wondering how they could make such an error when "rod" and "wrought" don't even rhyme...and then I realized that in some parts of the country, they might.
I would pronounce that as "rawt iron".
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Old 07-15-2012, 05:05 PM
 
Location: Shaw.
2,226 posts, read 3,142,569 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Sure!

I am always interested in this stuff.
I'll post some serious ones later, but here's a short guide:
Phillyspeak

On the topic:
Quote:
I Shore Do

In the cowboy movies I saw as a kid, every real Westerner said "shore" for "sure." So do Philadelphians. For us, "tour" is "tore," rather than "tooer.""You're" and "your" soundexactly like "yore"; "pour" and "poor" the same as "pore."
Also, linguistics have theorized that the mid-Atlantic dialect (especially Philly) was the ancestor dialect of standard American. It's the only non-rhotic dialect on the East Coast (New England to Georgia do not pronounce Rs at the end of words).
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Old 07-15-2012, 09:40 PM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,488 posts, read 16,150,620 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
I am in New Jersey, and we say neither. It's "shoor", rhyming with "poor".
We're the same!
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Old 07-16-2012, 07:24 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southernnaturelover View Post
I would pronounce that as "rawt iron".
That's correct!
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Old 07-16-2012, 07:26 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,005 posts, read 54,523,130 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
I'll post some serious ones later, but here's a short guide:
Phillyspeak

On the topic:


Also, linguistics have theorized that the mid-Atlantic dialect (especially Philly) was the ancestor dialect of standard American. It's the only non-rhotic dialect on the East Coast (New England to Georgia do not pronounce Rs at the end of words).
That's absolutely untrue.

I am from northern New Jersey, fifth generation here. We pronounce the Rs at the end of our words. The exception would be a few places close to New York City, such as Jersey City. Many New Yorkers do not pronounce the R, nor do some New Englanders. Now I live in Central Jersey, and people here pronounce their Rs as well.

That's why people from NJ get so annoyed when people from other parts of the country say "Joisey". No one in NJ says it that way. Unless they moved here from Brooklyn or something.

And go a little further south and you can hear the Philly accent having that odd vowel sound for O that I haven't heard anywhere else.

(To others, people from Philadelphia, and by extension, southern NJ, say "foon" for "phone" and "hoom" for "home", etc.)
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Old 07-16-2012, 08:23 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,361,353 times
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Rhotic and non-rhotic accents - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Scroll down to map of Eastern US to see traditionally non-rhotic areas.
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Old 07-16-2012, 09:22 AM
 
1,243 posts, read 1,595,176 times
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Its weird because you can hear a good amount of people not pronounce there Rs in Philly, specifically in South Philly and parts of South Jersey.

Steve Martorano on the Streets of South Philly - YouTube
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Old 07-16-2012, 08:10 PM
 
Location: Old Town Alexandria
14,505 posts, read 23,771,456 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
It's funny that we can sometimes have such different pronounciations. A friend and I were talking about the thread on the Writing forum where those of us who care about such things smack our foreheads over misused words and phrases. My friend said one that drives her nuts is on real estate sites--people use the term "rod iron" instead of "wrought iron". I was wondering how they could make such an error when "rod" and "wrought" don't even rhyme...and then I realized that in some parts of the country, they might.
rod iron? Kind of like a realtor who when describing a bedrooom, said (this was in the south ) here is the bedroom suit (she pronounced it like "business suit", ) , instead of "suite"

I had no idea what she meant, until I realized her vocabulary was off.
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