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Old 07-17-2012, 03:30 AM
 
Location: melbourne australia
32 posts, read 55,622 times
Reputation: 34

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most of my mates where I live go to america for a very long time and stay there for like ages.and then when they come back to australia again, they lose there aussie slang accent which is very weirdyeah...

I mean why???why should this happen.

I mean the crocidile hunter his wife is terry and bindi and bob there accents are perfectly australian but blends in with an american accent.

so what is it with aussies or other people around the world getting an american accent? I dunno because I will never lose my accent no matter where I go..

but that bindi and bob when I hear them speak there accent sounds sort of american and sort of australian.

because if an american came over hear to aussie land, would they catch an aussie accent?no and why???
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Old 07-17-2012, 03:40 AM
 
Location: Ohio
3,441 posts, read 5,192,007 times
Reputation: 2667
Yes, you tend to pick up the local accent through the years and you don't even notice it happening, others that are not around you a lot will notice.

Some, like Hugh Laurie, can turn it off and back on at will, his normal voice sounds nothing like Dr. House.
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Old 07-17-2012, 03:58 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,430,478 times
Reputation: 11862
I read something very interesting, I forgot where, which basically said that Aussies who go to the States often lose their accent (look at Nicole Kidman) very quickly, while Americans who come here often take years or barely even lose their accents at all. Same with English people. Notice all the English people here who still sound so English after decades? I think there's something to do with the accent, but God knows what...maybe a more plausible explanation is we're already used to the American accent on TV so that makes it easier for our brains to naturally just pick it up. I also here some young kids sounding American, saying 'sher' for 'sure' and saying 'dude' a lot.
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Old 07-17-2012, 04:11 AM
Status: "Be yourself. What's the alternative?" (set 25 days ago)
 
8,727 posts, read 10,857,046 times
Reputation: 12774
My SIL "caught" her Texan accent, went home to NY to visit and caught that one, in only a few days mind you. Then, back to Texas land. I personally thing she was really exaggerating the whole thing, but as you assimilate to where you are, you do start to talk like the locals--in time anyways.
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Old 07-17-2012, 07:52 AM
 
2,248 posts, read 6,210,992 times
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In Europe, British English is what's taught to kids in school, but because of the prominence of American music, films, etc many people end up speaking the American variant.

I know a woman who grew up in Germany, but has a perfect American accent, because she learned to pick up the subtleties through TV shows. She also said that the American pronunciations are easier to pronounce, overall.
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Old 07-17-2012, 08:33 AM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,489 posts, read 16,169,219 times
Reputation: 5641
Accents change. People acclimate to their environment over time. I've been away from my hometown long enough that I don't speak like "the locals" there anymore, yet I don't really sound like a native of my new home either. Wherever I go, people ask me "where are you from??"
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Old 07-18-2012, 11:28 PM
 
18 posts, read 15,953 times
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anytime your in another coutnry for a number of years your probably going to integrate somewhat with the said country.
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Old 07-19-2012, 02:52 AM
 
Location: Oxford, England
13,036 posts, read 22,029,139 times
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I am French and lived three years in the US and I ended up with an American Accent. Then I moved to the UK and now have a British accent to the point where people actually think I am a Brit. It is a not a conscious thing , I think for some people learning languages is about mimicking whatever your current linguistic surroundings are. A lot of Brits who go to the US end up with a Hybrid , a transatlantic drawl so to speak.

It never ceases to amaze me how many people live somewhere for years and still retain their native accents. So many French people in Oxford still sound like "Inspector Clouseau" after decades of living in the UK and it is the same with all other Nationalities.


It is as though their ears don't pick up the local accent which I find personally baffling. Maybe "catching" the local accent is simply a natural "camouflage" technique for some people, a way to blend in , not a conscious decision but simply what comes as natural. It is for me I think. Also maybe because I never really interact with French people I have lost the peculiar French staccato and cadences.
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Old 07-19-2012, 04:43 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
4,009 posts, read 5,519,041 times
Reputation: 4547
I've picked up some terminology but so far no accent (in 8 years). I still watch British TV for the most part- if I ever watch TV (My accent is English / Australian- but more English) and I think it helps keep my accent in tact.

Plus, I don't want to sound American. It's all well and good for others... but I like the attention my accent gets me
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Old 07-19-2012, 03:59 PM
 
Location: the dairyland
1,195 posts, read 1,928,034 times
Reputation: 1570
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mooseketeer View Post
I am French and lived three years in the US and I ended up with an American Accent. Then I moved to the UK and now have a British accent to the point where people actually think I am a Brit. It is a not a conscious thing , I think for some people learning languages is about mimicking whatever your current linguistic surroundings are. A lot of Brits who go to the US end up with a Hybrid , a transatlantic drawl so to speak.
Similar to me, I picked up an American accent. But, I am not a native speaker of English, neither are you. Would you start to speak French like a person from Quebec for example if you moved to Montreal or start to speak like a Belgian/Swiss/you name it? Doubtful. Maybe a few words, but that's it.
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