U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 09-12-2012, 04:54 PM
 
Location: USA
2,779 posts, read 6,690,021 times
Reputation: 1869

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by GuAnnerTHB View Post
I stand corrected. But the Delta still has very fertile land.
Yes, indeed it does! Flooding in the lower Mississippi valley deposits rich silt and sand from the upper midwest and makes for better than average crops. There's nothing infertile about it. Corn grows very well and has an earlier planting and harvest season than farther north. In addition, irrigation has worked well and makes up for the hot dry summers which seem to be happening more frequently than ever in the lms. A typical farming scenario is winter wheat harvested in May;soybeans planted in June and harvested in Sept-Oct. Rice planted in May, Corn in April or May, Cotton in May. These are the staple crops of the delta. Also raise beef cattle and previouly catfish although imports have curtailed fish ponds (not to mention the cost of the feed)

Okay a little lesson about the delta (never underestimate its farm value). I did read somewhere once that of the 10 leading agriculture states (based on farm receipts) all were in the midwest except California (#1) and Texas (#3). No midwestern state has agriculture as the least important industry. The information came from a well known encyclopaedia.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-12-2012, 05:01 PM
 
Location: West Tennessee
2,082 posts, read 2,901,578 times
Reputation: 1337
Quote:
Originally Posted by hdwell View Post
Yes, indeed it does! Flooding in the lower Mississippi valley deposits rich silt and sand from the upper midwest and makes for better than average crops. There's nothing infertile about it. Corn grows very well and has an earlier planting and harvest season than farther north. In addition, irrigation has worked well and makes up for the hot dry summers which seem to be happening more frequently than ever in the lms. A typical farming scenario is winter wheat harvested in May;soybeans planted in June and harvested in Sept-Oct. Rice planted in May, Corn in April or May, Cotton in May. These are the staple crops of the delta. Also raise beef cattle and previouly catfish although imports have curtailed fish ponds (not to mention the cost of the feed)
They have started growing rice as far north as Cape Girardeau, MO, which is the northern edge of the Mississippi Embayment It has really taken off up here over the past 5 years. They also grow it in far southern Illinois along the Mississippi River.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-12-2012, 05:12 PM
 
Location: USA
2,779 posts, read 6,690,021 times
Reputation: 1869
Quote:
Originally Posted by GunnerTHB View Post
They have started growing rice as far north as Cape Girardeau, MO, which is the northern edge of the Mississippi Embayment It has really taken off up here over the past 5 years. They also grow it in far southern Illinois along the Mississippi River.
(
Yes, actually rice can grow quite far north, actually up into the lower midwest where you live near. Do you grow sorghum cane there also (not to be confused with sugar cane)? How about Milo (some call this millet or kaffircorn)?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-12-2012, 05:46 PM
 
Location: West Tennessee
2,082 posts, read 2,901,578 times
Reputation: 1337
Quote:
Originally Posted by hdwell View Post
(
Yes, actually rice can grow quite far north, actually up into the lower midwest where you live near. Do you grow sorghum cane there also (not to be confused with sugar cane)? How about Milo (some call this millet or kaffircorn)?
Yes we grow both here. More Milo than sorghum though. They also used to grow cotton up to Cape Girardeau but they have switched over to corn, rice and beans until you get about 20 miles south. This seems to be a pattern in the entire bootheel since only one county is very heavily invested in cotton (Dunklin County). The rest have also started switching to corn/rice/beans.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-12-2012, 06:22 PM
 
Location: USA
2,779 posts, read 6,690,021 times
Reputation: 1869
Quote:
Originally Posted by GunnerTHB View Post
Yes we grow both here. More Milo than sorghum though. They also used to grow cotton up to Cape Girardeau but they have switched over to corn, rice and beans until you get about 20 miles south. This seems to be a pattern in the entire bootheel since only one county is very heavily invested in cotton (Dunklin County). The rest have also started switching to corn/rice/beans.
Yes, cotton is shrinking in acreage. I don't know if it's imports or shift into the southwestern states; I think it's imports from Brazil and such. They never have to replant cotton down there unlike we do and it makes more cotton from what I understand.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-12-2012, 07:33 PM
 
14,752 posts, read 28,629,477 times
Reputation: 8781
Answer: It LOVES its tailgate parties.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-12-2012, 07:58 PM
 
Location: IN
20,853 posts, read 35,970,544 times
Reputation: 13304
Quote:
Originally Posted by robertpolyglot View Post
Answer: It LOVES its tailgate parties.
Argh, processed fatty meats on a grill! How about sports and chips instead.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-13-2012, 01:14 AM
 
195 posts, read 560,032 times
Reputation: 326
As a lifelong Midwesterner, I kind of see the Midwest as kind of a place that is dedicated to being ordinary.

We're just people who want to work, go to school, have our families, maybe church, maybe not, but aren't obsessed with being ostentatious and flamboyant. Just be reliable, have integrity, and keep it real.

I kind of think that the mix between agriculture and manufacturing facilitates that mentality that kind of permeates the entire region.

To me, the core Midwestern states are Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin.

Then you have North Dakota, South Dakota, Kansas, and Nebraska as kind of the western edge, a barrier between the Midwest and the West.

Eastern New York and Pennsylvania are kind of like transitional zones between the East Coast and the Midwest, but not quite either per se. Close, but no cigar.

Missouri is like the Southern border, the Texas of the Midwest.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-13-2012, 07:32 AM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
1,328 posts, read 2,651,067 times
Reputation: 815
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lake County IN View Post
As a lifelong Midwesterner, I kind of see the Midwest as kind of a place that is dedicated to being ordinary.

We're just people who want to work, go to school, have our families, maybe church, maybe not, but aren't obsessed with being ostentatious and flamboyant. Just be reliable, have integrity, and keep it real.

I kind of think that the mix between agriculture and manufacturing facilitates that mentality that kind of permeates the entire region.

To me, the core Midwestern states are Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin.

Then you have North Dakota, South Dakota, Kansas, and Nebraska as kind of the western edge, a barrier between the Midwest and the West.

Eastern New York and Pennsylvania are kind of like transitional zones between the East Coast and the Midwest, but not quite either per se. Close, but no cigar.

Missouri is like the Southern border, the Texas of the Midwest.
That's the best description of the Midwest I've ever heard! This would be the region I'd consider roughly Midwestern, with the darker green being the true Midwest and the lighter green being areas that are not really Midwestern but share a lot of ties and similarities to the parts of the true Midwest nearby.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-13-2012, 07:57 AM
 
3,234 posts, read 7,632,792 times
Reputation: 2708
Quote:
Originally Posted by callmemaybe View Post
That's the best description of the Midwest I've ever heard! This would be the region I'd consider roughly Midwestern, with the darker green being the true Midwest and the lighter green being areas that are not really Midwestern but share a lot of ties and similarities to the parts of the true Midwest nearby.
A person from NY or PA will have nothing in common with somebody from MI, WI or MN
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top