U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 09-15-2012, 09:14 AM
 
425 posts, read 285,428 times
Reputation: 138

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Drewcifer View Post
The problem is that people think that New York City defines the entire northeast when really it is just a place in a larger region. There is no rat race is western Mass., or the Adirondaks or Maine. So they must be Midwestern, right?

Of course the answer is no. The northeast also has smaller cities and rural areas, just like the other regions of the country. They don't suddenly become Midwestern just because they aren't Manhatten.

Also, living in Minneapolis it is funny to see people on the coast use Midwestern as a term of derision for places. I don't think they realize that Midwestern means many things, some parts of the Midwest are more sophisticated than large swathes of the east coast.

Bingo!

Northeast is synonymous with fast-paced sophisticated living, so I guess the rural areas outside the cities but still within the Northeast are classified as Midwest because theyre not fast-paced, which is complete BS.

Nobody would dare say rural New England is Midwestern, would they? "Nooooo!, its Northeastern!" And why is that?

What about rural New Jersey? its not fast-paced, so its Midwest, right? No, youd never hear anyone suggest theyre Midwest.

The same goes for Upstate NY. It being less fast paced doesnt equate it to being Midwest.

Surprise surprise. Cities are more fast-paced in general than rural areas. It has nothing to do with ****ing Northeast vs. Midwest.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-15-2012, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Shaw.
2,226 posts, read 3,141,996 times
Reputation: 809
Quote:
Originally Posted by resuelppA View Post
Youre going to have these transitional cities, which is what I dont understand about people.

Buffalo, Pittsburgh and Cleveland are transitional.

Do people honestly expect a complete black and white divide here between Northeast and Midwest?
I wouldn't expect a completely black-and-white divide. I also agree that Buffalo, Pittsburgh and Cleveland are transitional. I've just come to the idea that while the first two are more Midwest-like, they're still in the Northeast, while Cleveland is considered pretty much by everyone that it's in the Midwest.

Quote:
Originally Posted by resuelppA View Post
I have never heard anyone from Buffalo say theyre Midwest.


See, this is what I dont get. Outsiders on here may suggest that Buffalo is Midwest from their POV, because it shares characteristics, but if youre gonna suggest that it is in the Midwest, then youre completely wrong.

Its as if people know whats best for Buffalo more than Buffalonians, or more about it than Buffalo itself.

You have to be raised there, or live there to really know what it is.
No one said to me that Buffalo is Midwestern. There's an article about the Midwest and the author got some complaints for not including Buffalo. For what it's worth, it has the Northern accent and it's part of the same glacial plane that formed the Midwest. But it's also strongly tied to the Northeast, so I'm fine with that definition.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-15-2012, 09:20 AM
 
425 posts, read 285,428 times
Reputation: 138
Midwest does not necessarily mean anti-fast-paced-sophisticated-city-life, because as you noted, there are Midwest cities more fast-paced than much of the Northeast.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-15-2012, 09:24 AM
 
425 posts, read 285,428 times
Reputation: 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
I wouldn't expect a completely black-and-white divide. I also agree that Buffalo, Pittsburgh and Cleveland are transitional. I've just come to the idea that while the first two are more Midwest-like, they're still in the Northeast, while Cleveland is considered pretty much by everyone that it's in the Midwest.



No one said to me that Buffalo is Midwestern. There's an article about the Midwest and the author got some complaints for not including Buffalo. For what it's worth, it has the Northern accent and it's part of the same glacial plane that formed the Midwest. But it's also strongly tied to the Northeast, so I'm fine with that definition.

Utica has the Inland Northern Vowel Shift (Great Lakes accent from well, Utica-Syracuse-Rochester-Buffalo-Cleveland-Detroit-Chicago-Milwaukee-Minneapolis/St Paul).

However, Utica is not Midwestern by definition just because its a shared trait. Utica is definitely Northeastern, and its not something decided by an outsider. Its something that the people of Utica know. They know their region.

Like I was saying about Buffalo, you dont get it til you live there are or raised there to see the mind-set of the people.

They know theyre Northeast, but might not know they share characteristics with Midwest or Great Lakes cities. That lack of knowing doesnt necessarily mean theyre Midwest though. You have to see the cities operate without outside influence. A lot of these cities in Upstate NY are very provincial, and so are the other Midwest/Great Lakes ones. So a foreigner might think theyre all the same, but the city residents dont.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-15-2012, 10:15 AM
 
2,076 posts, read 3,077,441 times
Reputation: 883
Quote:
Originally Posted by garmin239 View Post
According to multiple people posting here who have actually spent time in the region, you are wrong. You seem to be the only one still trying to support your failing argument. You quoted a thread about Syracuse being "midwestern friendly", not Midwestern. There is a difference.
I have spent time in both regions too. I'm not sure what the other barking dogs experiences are but anyways you are wrong, I gave specific quotes where people specifically stated Syracuse is a blend of midwestern and northeastern culture. No mention of the specific trait 'friendliness' other than the op.

There is no hard and fast rule for the midwest and northeast. These categories exist in people's heads and to me and many others Syracuse just really ain't the northeast.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-15-2012, 10:20 AM
 
3,234 posts, read 7,627,024 times
Reputation: 2694
Quote:
Originally Posted by PosterExtraordinaire View Post
I have spent time in both regions too. I'm not sure what the other barking dogs experiences are but anyways you are wrong, I gave specific quotes where people specifically stated Syracuse is a blend of midwestern and northeastern culture. No mention of the specific trait 'friendliness' other than the op.

There is no hard and fast rule for the midwest and northeast. These categories exist in people's heads and to me and many others Syracuse just really ain't the northeast.
I really don't think you have spent any sort of significant time in the NY region. Your posts show it. I can find random quotes on the internet stating all sorts of crazy things.... doesn't make it true. It seems that the people making the weak midwestern argument are the people who haven't spent any time in NY.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-15-2012, 10:26 AM
 
2,076 posts, read 3,077,441 times
Reputation: 883
Quote:
Originally Posted by resuelppA View Post

They know theyre Northeast, but might not know they share characteristics with Midwest or Great Lakes cities.
I spent enough time to know that they think they're northeast. but that really isn't important. Self-identification is only 50% of the issue. The other 50% is how everyone else identifies you.

Being the midwest is sort of like being chicken. When you can't really describe the taste, you say it tastes like Chicken. The south has a very distinct culture for american standards while the northeast and the west coast both have a desirability factor to living there. The midwest has neither, it's rather vanilla and hard to identify. Sort of like the cities Rochester and Buffalo and even Syracuse.

Let me enter in Pittsburgh here, though I feel Pittsburgh more of an Appalachian city before it is midwest (but again definitely not northeastern). Since my sister lives there, I go there semi-often (well lol, haven't been for years but used to go more) and have some friends there. A lot of them identify as northeasterners but don't correct me when I make remarks when I point out that to me it feels more midwestern than eastern. In their hearts they know they're wrong
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-15-2012, 10:26 AM
 
4,664 posts, read 3,611,049 times
Reputation: 2046
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
The fact that it takes money to get to the mountains or coast from there.
Not much money to get to the mountains from Akron, Ohio though. Hour+ drive east and you're in the Pennsylvania mountains.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-15-2012, 10:28 AM
 
2,076 posts, read 3,077,441 times
Reputation: 883
Quote:
Originally Posted by garmin239 View Post
I really don't think you have spent any sort of significant time in the NY region. Your posts show it. I can find random quotes on the internet stating all sorts of crazy things.... doesn't make it true. It seems that the people making the weak midwestern argument are the people who haven't spent any time in NY.
I can flip that, how much time did you spend in Ohio?

I'm going to confidently multiply it by 10 and that's how much I spent in interior NY. Not NYC, just interior NY.

I used to go all the time to Peek n Peek for skiing, sunshine, when I lived in Detroit. I'm actually VERY familiar with Buffalo and have spent some time in both Rochester and Syracuse.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-15-2012, 10:33 AM
 
3,234 posts, read 7,627,024 times
Reputation: 2694
Quote:
Originally Posted by PosterExtraordinaire View Post
I can flip that, how much time did you spend in Ohio?

I'm going to confidently multiply it by 10 and that's how much I spent in interior NY. Not NYC, just interior NY.

I used to go all the time to Peek n Peek for skiing, sunshine, when I lived in Detroit. I'm actually VERY familiar with Buffalo and have spent some time in both Rochester and Syracuse.
I get sent to Ohio for work every now and then and a work trip lasts about a month(Cleveland, Akron, Toledo, Dayton/Cinci). So I've spent a significant amount of time there over the years.
Going to a small ski town near the PA border, nowhere near any of the cities mentioned this thread hardly gives you a feel of what the upstate cities are like.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top