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Old 09-15-2012, 12:14 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by garmin239 View Post
that would seem fair but at the end of a day it's a city data poll which is useless. But go for it.
Rochester, NY more similar to.........

It's all in fun but again these labels (midwest/northeast) aren't scientific or mathematic. There is nothing to prove. People's aggregate opinions are the most important.
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Old 09-15-2012, 06:14 PM
 
Location: Shaw.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PosterExtraordinaire View Post
How about Rochester, NY more similar to Milwaukee, Wisconsin or Providence, Rhode Island.

One is quintessential rust-belt/great lakes/midwest. The other is quintessential north east/east coast. They are both about 700 miles away from Rochester and in different states. Providence and Milwaukee both have metros of about 1.5 million people and Rochester 1 million. Fair race, eh?
To be fair, I don't think Philly has all that much to do with Providence either.
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Old 09-15-2012, 06:32 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PosterExtraordinaire View Post
I'm very confident on all the great lakes cities as I've been to all but duluth. And Rochester has much more in common with Milwaukee than Providence despite it being much closer to Providence. Hate to break it to ya.

I'll admit the cities I threw together in the great plains category maybe not good fits. I'm not well traveled there. And maybe I should have defined an "appalachian" region where pittsburgh and cincinnati could have shared a category. Since neither are stereotypical midwestern this isn't detracting from my belief that the traditional midwest is largely 2 regions.

As for Minneapolis, I know that's she a funky city surrounded by lakes while OKC is a conservative large town/small city with southern influences. But Minneapolis largely developed along the same lines as OKC which developed largely along the lines of other great plains cities. Just compare the skyline of Minneapolis to OKC...they resemble each other much more than if you compare the skyline of Minneapolis to Detroit or Rochester or Milwaukee or even St. Louis. The great lakes cities reached their peek 50,s60s and experienced decline in the 70s and 80s. And many continue to experience decline today, while the great plains is (slowly) booming and haven't peeked out yet. Minneapolis also functions as a hub for great plains states (like the dakotas) whereas not so much for the great lakes states (no one in wisconsin will drive to minneapolis over chicago).

Anyways, you have way too many categories for the midwest which defeats the purpose. why not just add a few more categories and categorize each city individually lol. I think mine (at least the great lakes/east coast which I'm well traveled) is a good one.
I have been to many cities in both the great plains and the midwest. Minneapolis seems to resemble a great plains city more than it does a midwestern city. The way it is laid out, built etc. GP to GL delimeter is just east of Minneapolis, Des Moines, Columbia MO on down to eastern OK and pushes at least as far south as Dallas and westerward to the front range (Denver, CO springs). There are obvious regional influences that make each of these places differ a bit, but these cities are very much gp cities.
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Old 09-16-2012, 12:01 AM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Omahahonors View Post
I have been to many cities in both the great plains and the midwest. Minneapolis seems to resemble a great plains city more than it does a midwestern city. The way it is laid out, built etc. GP to GL delimeter is just east of Minneapolis, Des Moines, Columbia MO on down to eastern OK and pushes at least as far south as Dallas and westerward to the front range (Denver, CO springs). There are obvious regional influences that make each of these places differ a bit, but these cities are very much gp cities.
Oklahoma and Dallas are not Midwestern at all. The most states I would ever include in the Midwest would be the ones the Census Bureau considers to be. Oklahoma and Texas have virtually nothing in common with the Midwest. Even the crops grown are not the same.
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Old 09-16-2012, 12:03 AM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Omahahonors View Post
I have been to many cities in both the great plains and the midwest. Minneapolis seems to resemble a great plains city more than it does a midwestern city. The way it is laid out, built etc. GP to GL delimeter is just east of Minneapolis, Des Moines, Columbia MO on down to eastern OK and pushes at least as far south as Dallas and westerward to the front range (Denver, CO springs). There are obvious regional influences that make each of these places differ a bit, but these cities are very much gp cities.
A Great Plains city? Minneapolis is still very strongly culturally linked to the Great Lakes cities. Omaha, Minneapolis, and Kansas City have a lot more in common with the Midwest cities to the east than Tulsa, Dallas, or Denver.
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Old 09-16-2012, 12:06 AM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
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Quote:
Originally Posted by garmin239 View Post
yes they are. Cinci seems to have a southern influence, Columbus seems more "new" and Cleveland is more gritty and rust belt. Roch Buffalo, Syracuse and Albany are more similar.... But comparing the upstate cities to cities in Ohio or other midwestern states, there is a large difference that is noticeable from spending 10 minutes in the area.
Using your flawed logic other smaller cities such as Providence, Springfield, and New Haven are midwestern too.
Slang and local cuisine really stick out in a city, making it distinct from anybody with half a brain.
If Cincinnati has a southern influence, it's very light. It is still very much a Midwestern city.
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Old 09-16-2012, 07:28 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
If Cincinnati has a southern influence, it's very light. It is still very much a Midwestern city.
It's very strongly an Appalachian influenced city. Right down to the drawl. I can see why someone would mistake that for southern. Hell to most people, southern and Appalachian are two of the same thing.
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Old 09-16-2012, 07:29 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
To be fair, I don't think Philly has all that much to do with Providence either.
if I made the poll: is Philly more similar to Milwaukee or Providence it'd be 7 vs 3 in favor of Providence though instead of Milwaukee.
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Old 09-16-2012, 07:31 AM
 
2,076 posts, read 3,079,387 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
Oklahoma and Dallas are not Midwestern at all. The most states I would ever include in the Midwest would be the ones the Census Bureau considers to be. Oklahoma and Texas have virtually nothing in common with the Midwest. Even the crops grown are not the same.
Why is the Census Bureau the official arbitrar of these things? Especially since they go by state lines? Culture does not stop at state lines.
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Old 09-16-2012, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
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The Midwest has been officially designated as 25 miles either side of US Highway 12 between Lake Zurich and Litchfield. I don't know what kind of crack the rest of you are smoking but that's the fact, Jack.
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