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Old 07-18-2012, 09:00 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,526 posts, read 7,483,594 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ForYourLungsOnly View Post
It's very prevalent in the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic and South too.

Agriculture is NOT as prevalent in the northeast, mid Atlantic and south as it is in the midwest. Is it in those regions? of course it is. It is not on the same level however. I live in central Michigan and when I travel I always notice how much less agriculutre there is. In the south I see alot of southern pines, alot of rocky ground in the upper south but agriculture is spotty there. In the mid-Atlantic I see some agriculuture but it is overun with suburban development, and again areas of hills mountains and rock. The northeast is again rocky, mountainous in places and agriculture is much less prevalent. Where I live you see crops everywhere, and this is true acrost the midwest. The only exception is the northern parts of Mi, Wi and Mn where you will find more forest, less planting. Soil quality is different in those areas.
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Old 07-18-2012, 09:17 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
Agriculture is NOT as prevalent in the northeast, mid Atlantic and south as it is in the midwest. Is it in those regions? of course it is. It is not on the same level however. I live in central Michigan and when I travel I always notice how much less agriculutre there is. In the south I see alot of southern pines, alot of rocky ground in the upper south but agriculture is spotty there. In the mid-Atlantic I see some agriculuture but it is overun with suburban development, and again areas of hills mountains and rock. The northeast is again rocky, mountainous in places and agriculture is much less prevalent. Where I live you see crops everywhere, and this is true acrost the midwest. The only exception is the northern parts of Mi, Wi and Mn where you will find more forest, less planting. Soil quality is different in those areas.

Upstate NY and PA are very agricultural states, actually.

Its more prevalent because the Midwest is much much bigger in size, thats it.





Quote:
The Erie Canal, completed in 1825, opened eastern markets to Midwest farm products. The canal also contributed to the growth of New York City, helped create large cities, and encouraged immigration to the state. Except in the mountain regions, the areas between cities are agriculturally rich. The Finger Lakes region has orchards producing apples, which are one of New York's leading crops. The state is known for wines produced at vineyards in the Finger Lakes region and Long Island. The state also produces other crops, especially grapes, strawberries, cherries, pears, onions, and potatoes. New York is a major supplier of maple syrup and is the third leading producer of dairy goods in the United States.
According to the Department of Agriculture and Markets,[10] New York's agricultural production returned more than $3.6 billion to the farm economy in 2005. 35,600 farms occupy 7.55 million acres (31,000 km˛), or about 25 percent of the state’s land area, to produce an array of food products. Here are some of the items in which New York ranks high nationally:
New York is an agricultural leader and is one of the top five states for agricultural products, including dairy, apples, cherries, cabbages, potatoes, onions, maple syrup and many others. The state is the largest producer of cabbage in the U.S. The state has about a quarter of its land in farms and produced $3.4 billion in agricultural products in 2001. The south shore of Lake Ontario provides the right mix of soils and microclimate for apple, cherry, plum, pear and peach orchards. Apples are also grown in the Hudson Valley and near Lake Champlain. The south shore of Lake Erie and the southern Finger Lakes hillsides have vineyards. New York is the nation's third-largest grape-producing state, after California and Washington, and second largest wine producer by volume. In 2004, New York's wine and grape industry brought $6 billion into the state economy. The state has 30,000 acres (120 km˛) of vineyards, 212 wineries, and produced 200 million bottles of wine in 2004.
New York was heavily glaciated in the ice age leaving much of the state with deep, fertile, though somewhat rocky soils. Row crops, including hay, corn, wheat, oats, barley, and soybeans, are grown. Particularly in the western part of the state, sweet corn, peas, carrots, squash, cucumbers and other vegetables are grown. The Hudson and Mohawk Valleys are known for pumpkins and blueberries. The glaciers also left numerous swampy areas, which have been drained for the rich humus soils called muckland which is mostly used for onions, potatoes, celery and other vegetables. Dairy farms are present throughout much of the state. Cheese is a major product, often produced by Amish or Mennonite farm cheeseries. New York is rich in nectar-producing plants and is a major honey-producing state. The honeybees are also used for pollination of fruits and vegetables. Most commercial beekeepers are migratory, taking their hives to southern states for the winter. Most cities have Farmers' markets which are well supplied by local farmers.
Quote:
Pennsylvania ranks 19th overall in agricultural production,[70] but 1st in mushrooms, 2nd in apples, 3rd in Christmas trees and layer chickens, 4th in nursery and sod, milk, corn for silage, grapes grown (including juice grapes),[71] and horses production. It also ranks 8th in the nation in Winemaking.[71]
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Old 07-18-2012, 09:38 PM
 
1,189 posts, read 1,813,173 times
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the entire midwest goes to walgreens and calls soda coke or pop.
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Old 07-18-2012, 09:45 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amercity View Post
the entire midwest goes to walgreens and calls soda coke or pop.
But they call soda "soda" in St. Louis.
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Old 07-18-2012, 09:52 PM
 
313 posts, read 286,977 times
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Western NY and Western PA.
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Old 07-18-2012, 10:01 PM
 
313 posts, read 286,977 times
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People in the Northeast dont shop at Walgreens?
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Old 07-18-2012, 10:05 PM
 
Location: southern california
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guts, work ethic, family values, and the backbone of the military and police force. other than that, they are just like anybody else in detroit, new orleans or memphis .
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Old 07-18-2012, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,526 posts, read 7,483,594 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpaceisforAce View Post
Upstate NY and PA are very agricultural states, actually.

Its more prevalent because the Midwest is much much bigger in size, thats it.



I was not suggesting that you do not have alot of agriculture, but it is the midwest that has the most. Much of New york State, escpecially upstate NY is mountainous and agriculture is impossible on the side of a mountain. I know NY is a dairy state, and from what I read it produces an impressive amount of dairy products. I still stand by my statement however that there is a big difference between the midwest and almost anywhere else when it comes to the amount of agriculture in the regions. In this area the midwest is dominant, there really is no disputing this reality. Disputing the dominace of the midwest in agriculture would be sort of like disputing that Florida is a warm sunny state.
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Old 07-18-2012, 10:09 PM
 
313 posts, read 286,977 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
I was not suggesting that you do not have alot of agriculture, but it is the midwest that has the most. Much of New york State, escpecially upstate NY is mountainous and agriculture is impossible on the side of a mountain. I know NY is a dairy state, and from what I read it produces an impressive amount of dairy products. I still stand by my statement however that there is a big difference between the midwest and almost anywhere else when it comes to the amount of agriculture in the regions. In this area the midwest is dominant, there really is no disputing this reality. Disputing the dominace of the midwest in agriculture would be sort of like disputing that Florida is a warm sunny state.

Like I said, its entirely due to the size of the region. The Midwest is much larger. It has nothing to do with the states lacking ability in the Northeast.
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Old 07-18-2012, 11:14 PM
 
160 posts, read 335,742 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpaceisforAce View Post
Like I said, its entirely due to the size of the region. The Midwest is much larger. It has nothing to do with the states lacking ability in the Northeast.
I don't know why you're defending this so vehemently. It's not a matter of size. Farming is more prevalent in the Midwest, which is a term that has nothing to do with total area.

Agriculture sector top states by percentage of state economy - Industries | EconPost

Obviously that metric is going to be skewed towards states without large metros, so that takes some Northeastern states out of the running, but that's also the case with several Midwestern states. Or you could look at the raw GDP from agriculture:

Agriculture sector top 10 states by GDP - Industries | EconPost

And, of course, that one is biased towards larger states, but Iowa, Illinois, and Wisconsin are only slightly larger in land area than New York or Pennsylvania.

10 of 12 Midwestern states get an above average percentage (for the entire U.S.) of their GDP from agriculture. 2 of 9 Northeastern states do.
Yes, parts of the Northeast have a strong farming industry. So does, say, Louisiana. The difference is that farming is virtually ubiquitous in the rural Midwest.

Also, I have to point out that I love that soda vs. pop map, but I live in Madison, which is blue, and no one says pop except transplants. You don't start hearing it until Iowa or the Twin Cities suburbs. At least 80% of Wisconsin says "soda".
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