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Old 07-18-2012, 11:34 PM
 
18 posts, read 16,017 times
Reputation: 26

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extreme sameness is very boring, callmemaybe
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Old 07-19-2012, 12:01 AM
 
313 posts, read 287,602 times
Reputation: 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by argot View Post
I don't know why you're defending this so vehemently. It's not a matter of size. Farming is more prevalent in the Midwest, which is a term that has nothing to do with total area.

Agriculture sector top states by percentage of state economy - Industries | EconPost

Obviously that metric is going to be skewed towards states without large metros, so that takes some Northeastern states out of the running, but that's also the case with several Midwestern states. Or you could look at the raw GDP from agriculture:

Agriculture sector top 10 states by GDP - Industries | EconPost

And, of course, that one is biased towards larger states, but Iowa, Illinois, and Wisconsin are only slightly larger in land area than New York or Pennsylvania.

10 of 12 Midwestern states get an above average percentage (for the entire U.S.) of their GDP from agriculture. 2 of 9 Northeastern states do.
Yes, parts of the Northeast have a strong farming industry. So does, say, Louisiana. The difference is that farming is virtually ubiquitous in the rural Midwest.

Also, I have to point out that I love that soda vs. pop map, but I live in Madison, which is blue, and no one says pop except transplants. You don't start hearing it until Iowa or the Twin Cities suburbs. At least 80% of Wisconsin says "soda".

He had no idea NY was top 5 for agriculture products. Most Midwesterners think the Northeast is just NYC, Boston and Philly.

Upstate NY and PA is full of farmland and are very agricultural states. Hes sounding as if the Midwest is the only place capable of producing anything. What substantial crops can those states grow NY and PA cant? Thats my point. It then becomes just a matter of size, since the Midwest is obviously much larger. It doesnt make NY or PA any less agricultural because the Northeast is smaller in comparison.
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Old 07-19-2012, 01:32 AM
 
Location: Paris
1,709 posts, read 2,060,963 times
Reputation: 995
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amercity View Post
the entire midwest goes to walgreens and calls soda coke or pop.
I thought you lived in St. Louis?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
But they call soda "soda" in St. Louis.
Exactly...
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Old 07-19-2012, 02:31 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
671 posts, read 1,235,590 times
Reputation: 706
Cold winters and hot summers
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Old 07-19-2012, 03:07 AM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,244,088 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by ForYourLungsOnly View Post
It's very prevalent in the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic and South too.
Not to the degree of the Midwest. The Midwest has specific trademark crops, such as corn and wheat, which are grown in mass amounts that aren't grown anywhere else. in addition, most of the Midwest has a Catholic element to it, and the accent is pretty close to General American...the closest you'll find in the eastern and central portions of the country.
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Old 07-19-2012, 05:00 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
3,086 posts, read 5,471,383 times
Reputation: 4347
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpaceisforAce View Post
He had no idea NY was top 5 for agriculture products. Most Midwesterners think the Northeast is just NYC, Boston and Philly.

Upstate NY and PA is full of farmland and are very agricultural states. Hes sounding as if the Midwest is the only place capable of producing anything. What substantial crops can those states grow NY and PA cant? Thats my point. It then becomes just a matter of size, since the Midwest is obviously much larger. It doesnt make NY or PA any less agricultural because the Northeast is smaller in comparison.
Sorry, but this is not correct.

It is not just the size of the region that makes the Midwest more of an agricultural region. Illinois, Indiana, Nebraska, Iowa, and parts of other Midwest states have the best soils in the world, and product better crop yields per acre than anywhere in the Northeast. It is not just because there is more space.

This map shows the corn yields in bushels per acre by state. Notice the dark green colors in Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, Ohio, Minnesota, etc. The cornfields in these states are producing much more per acre than cornfields in the northeast. This stat does not measure how much land is used for farming. It is only measuring the quality of farming.

Don't get me wrong... NY and Penn are definitely agricultural states, and the farms are especially beautiful because of the hilly terrain. I love driving through those states. But the farmers there are not working with the same quality of land that the farmers in the heartland are.

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Old 07-19-2012, 05:13 AM
 
2,601 posts, read 4,087,826 times
Reputation: 2275
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amercity View Post
the entire midwest goes to walgreens and calls soda coke or pop.
Except in a LOT of Wisconsin, where we call it soda.
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Old 07-19-2012, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn
40,056 posts, read 30,602,040 times
Reputation: 10491
Quote:
Originally Posted by plates View Post
Agriculture is prevalent throughout the Midwest.
Yes, but the OP specifically mentioned the entire Midwest. I could be wrong about this, but I don't think there's too much agriculture going on in places like Chicago, St. Louis and Minneapolis (just to name three).

I was going to suggest the winter weather as a common factor.
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Old 07-19-2012, 09:45 AM
 
350 posts, read 611,378 times
Reputation: 352
The only thing all Midwestern states have in common is that German Americans are the largest ancestry. I don't see anything else...
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Old 07-19-2012, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Englewood, Near Eastside Indy
8,345 posts, read 14,149,014 times
Reputation: 5968
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred314X View Post
Yes, but the OP specifically mentioned the entire Midwest. I could be wrong about this, but I don't think there's too much agriculture going on in places like Chicago, St. Louis and Minneapolis (just to name three).

I was going to suggest the winter weather as a common factor.
If the ENTIRE Midwest was nothing but agriculture, where would people live?
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