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Old 07-19-2012, 11:12 AM
 
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New York and Pennsylvania do not compare with Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska, etc, in terms of agricultural production or soil fertility. They are not even close...

I still think that Anheuser-Busch has something to do with the fact that the St. Louis area and eastern Wisconsin say "soda" instead of the usual "pop" moniker found throughout the Midwest..
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Old 07-19-2012, 11:14 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,219 posts, read 17,954,379 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by callmemaybe View Post
What is a common thread that makes Bismarck, North Dakota and Akron, Ohio both Midwestern?
Neither one is near an ocean.
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Old 07-19-2012, 11:18 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpaceisforAce View Post
Upstate NY and PA is full of farmland and are very agricultural states. Hes sounding as if the Midwest is the only place capable of producing anything. What substantial crops can those states grow NY and PA cant? Thats my point. It then becomes just a matter of size, since the Midwest is obviously much larger. It doesnt make NY or PA any less agricultural because the Northeast is smaller in comparison.
The scale of agriculture in the Northeast is much smaller than it is in the Midwest, and so is the amount and percentage of arable land.
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Old 07-19-2012, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
Neither one is near an ocean.
I've often hear the Great Lakes referred to as the Third Coast.
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Old 07-19-2012, 12:11 PM
 
976 posts, read 1,879,290 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MassVt View Post
New York and Pennsylvania do not compare with Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska, etc, in terms of agricultural production or soil fertility. They are not even close...

I still think that Anheuser-Busch has something to do with the fact that the St. Louis area and eastern Wisconsin say "soda" instead of the usual "pop" moniker found throughout the Midwest..
faygo, based in detroit, is the company that popularized "pop" in the 1950s. both st. louis and milwaukee had strong local soft drink brands which prevented faygo from penetrating those markets. therefore, soda remained the preferred moniker.

i read a newspaper article years ago (forget where) explaining this.
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Old 07-19-2012, 05:55 PM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,942,861 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michigan83 View Post
Sorry, but this is not correct.

It is not just the size of the region that makes the Midwest more of an agricultural region. Illinois, Indiana, Nebraska, Iowa, and parts of other Midwest states have the best soils in the world, and product better crop yields per acre than anywhere in the Northeast. It is not just because there is more space.

This map shows the corn yields in bushels per acre by state. Notice the dark green colors in Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, Ohio, Minnesota, etc. The cornfields in these states are producing much more per acre than cornfields in the northeast. This stat does not measure how much land is used for farming. It is only measuring the quality of farming.

Don't get me wrong... NY and Penn are definitely agricultural states, and the farms are especially beautiful because of the hilly terrain. I love driving through those states. But the farmers there are not working with the same quality of land that the farmers in the heartland are.

I did not know that corn was grown in large quantities in southern Montana and northern Wyoming. That is a new one.
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Old 07-19-2012, 11:01 PM
 
22 posts, read 13,579 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michigan83 View Post
Sorry, but this is not correct.

It is not just the size of the region that makes the Midwest more of an agricultural region. Illinois, Indiana, Nebraska, Iowa, and parts of other Midwest states have the best soils in the world, and product better crop yields per acre than anywhere in the Northeast. It is not just because there is more space.

This map shows the corn yields in bushels per acre by state. Notice the dark green colors in Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, Ohio, Minnesota, etc. The cornfields in these states are producing much more per acre than cornfields in the northeast. This stat does not measure how much land is used for farming. It is only measuring the quality of farming.

Don't get me wrong... NY and Penn are definitely agricultural states, and the farms are especially beautiful because of the hilly terrain. I love driving through those states. But the farmers there are not working with the same quality of land that the farmers in the heartland are.

Interesting how parts of the south grow a lot of corn now. Such as the MS delta of the south that starts in Scott County Missouri on down into southern MS and LA.
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Old 07-20-2012, 01:30 AM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,227,706 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MassVt View Post
New York and Pennsylvania do not compare with Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska, etc, in terms of agricultural production or soil fertility. They are not even close...

I still think that Anheuser-Busch has something to do with the fact that the St. Louis area and eastern Wisconsin say "soda" instead of the usual "pop" moniker found throughout the Midwest..
Anheuser Busch isn't in Wisconsin. Regardless, soda vs. pop don't make that large of a difference in dialect. My father uses "coke" and he's as Midwestern as they come. Northeasterners tend to drop their "r's", a trait you won't find in any area of the Midwest. Also, all of the Midwest has the General American accent or has strong elements of General American developed into its speech patterns with slight tendencies towards other regions (Upper Midwest has a bit of Canadian, Lower Midwest speaks South Midland...General American with a few southern tendencies).
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Old 07-20-2012, 01:31 AM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,227,706 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpaceisforAce View Post
He had no idea NY was top 5 for agriculture products. Most Midwesterners think the Northeast is just NYC, Boston and Philly.

Upstate NY and PA is full of farmland and are very agricultural states. Hes sounding as if the Midwest is the only place capable of producing anything. What substantial crops can those states grow NY and PA cant? Thats my point. It then becomes just a matter of size, since the Midwest is obviously much larger. It doesnt make NY or PA any less agricultural because the Northeast is smaller in comparison.
NY and PA don't have nearly the amount of corn, soybeans, etc. that the twelve states of the Midwest do. As agricultural as they may be, they still don't compare to the Midwest. Besides, some would agree that the western portions of these states are more like the Midwest anyway. I for one agree with that...my personal opinion is that Pittsburgh, Erie, Buffalo, Syracuse, and Rochester have three times as much in common with Cleveland as they do with the Bos-Wash corridor.
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Old 07-20-2012, 03:16 PM
 
Location: West Tennessee
2,081 posts, read 2,898,733 times
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Originally Posted by DesertFoxFan View Post
Interesting how parts of the south grow a lot of corn now. Such as the MS delta of the south that starts in Scott County Missouri on down into southern MS and LA.
onegoal the Mississippi Delta has always grown a lot of corn. It's only the most fertile soil in the world. It's not like Corn is only grown in the Midwest
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