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Old 07-20-2012, 03:44 PM
 
22 posts, read 13,626 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GunnerTHB View Post
onegoal the Mississippi Delta has always grown a lot of corn. It's only the most fertile soil in the world. It's not like Corn is only grown in the Midwest
Why is it in some areas of the delta are moving away from cotton, and growing more corn, soybean?
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Old 07-20-2012, 05:08 PM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
21,393 posts, read 21,967,727 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GunnerTHB View Post
onegoal the Mississippi Delta has always grown a lot of corn. It's only the most fertile soil in the world. It's not like Corn is only grown in the Midwest
baaaap...error...wrong...

There are twelve types of soil taxonomy in the world. Of the twelve, the most naturally fertile soils are mollisols, according to Robert McLeese, soil scientist for the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS). Mollisols are predominantly found in only four places on Earth: in the U.S., the Pampas region of Argentina, the steppes of Ukraine and Russia, and in areas of Northeast China.

Mollisols found in the Midwestern U.S. are the best for agriculture due to the grasslands that were present thousands of years ago. These prairies produced strong and fertile soils because after each year, the grasses would breakdown and contribute nutrients to the ground. In other areas of the world where mollisols are found, short and mid-sized grass prairies were present. These shorter prairies contributed to the fertile land, but did not contribute the same soil nutrients as the tall grass prairies.

Once the Wisconsin Glacier retracted from Illinois and Iowa, great dust storms blew fertile silt on top of the young land, making this land the ideal for farming.

Farmland Forecast: U.S. Farmland Best Investment



THE PHYSICAL CONDITION of Delta soils frequently limits crop production....
Poor physical condition has long been recognized on the clay soils, but the development of physical limitations on some of the lighter soils or at least the awareness of them did not occur until recent years. Among the factors that have had a deleterious effect on the physical properties are loss of organic matter, erosion, inadequate drainage, improper cultural practices, and traffic by equipment.
The relatively high temperatures and high moisture in the Delta are conducive to the rapid decomposition of organic material and its subsequent loss. Thus the soils quickly lost a major part of their original organic matter shortly after being brought into cultivation. The result was a lowered stability of structure, a reduced water intake, and more runoff. The conditions that are responsible for the depletion make it difficult to replenish or maintain adequate organic matter.
Although most of the land is gently rolling, erosion is serious. Most of the organic matter was in the top few inches and has been most affected by erosion. Furthermore, the ratio of sand, silt, and clay in the surface soil provided better physical condition than the deeper soil. The removal of the surface layer by sheet erosion leaves material with less desirable physical properties exposed or near the surface.

The Mississippi Delta Region from Soil Part 3 - Regions
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Old 07-21-2012, 10:54 AM
 
Location: West Tennessee
2,083 posts, read 2,908,058 times
Reputation: 1337
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghengis View Post
baaaap...error...wrong...

There are twelve types of soil taxonomy in the world. Of the twelve, the most naturally fertile soils are mollisols, according to Robert McLeese, soil scientist for the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS). Mollisols are predominantly found in only four places on Earth: in the U.S., the Pampas region of Argentina, the steppes of Ukraine and Russia, and in areas of Northeast China.

Mollisols found in the Midwestern U.S. are the best for agriculture due to the grasslands that were present thousands of years ago. These prairies produced strong and fertile soils because after each year, the grasses would breakdown and contribute nutrients to the ground. In other areas of the world where mollisols are found, short and mid-sized grass prairies were present. These shorter prairies contributed to the fertile land, but did not contribute the same soil nutrients as the tall grass prairies.

Once the Wisconsin Glacier retracted from Illinois and Iowa, great dust storms blew fertile silt on top of the young land, making this land the ideal for farming.

Farmland Forecast: U.S. Farmland Best Investment



THE PHYSICAL CONDITION of Delta soils frequently limits crop production....
Poor physical condition has long been recognized on the clay soils, but the development of physical limitations on some of the lighter soils or at least the awareness of them did not occur until recent years. Among the factors that have had a deleterious effect on the physical properties are loss of organic matter, erosion, inadequate drainage, improper cultural practices, and traffic by equipment.
The relatively high temperatures and high moisture in the Delta are conducive to the rapid decomposition of organic material and its subsequent loss. Thus the soils quickly lost a major part of their original organic matter shortly after being brought into cultivation. The result was a lowered stability of structure, a reduced water intake, and more runoff. The conditions that are responsible for the depletion make it difficult to replenish or maintain adequate organic matter.
Although most of the land is gently rolling, erosion is serious. Most of the organic matter was in the top few inches and has been most affected by erosion. Furthermore, the ratio of sand, silt, and clay in the surface soil provided better physical condition than the deeper soil. The removal of the surface layer by sheet erosion leaves material with less desirable physical properties exposed or near the surface.

The Mississippi Delta Region from Soil Part 3 - Regions
I stand corrected. But the Delta still has very fertile land.
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Old 07-21-2012, 12:47 PM
 
Location: Indiana
48 posts, read 59,115 times
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What does the entire Midwest have in common?

There are all next to each other in the north central U.S.
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Old 07-21-2012, 12:52 PM
 
Location: IN
20,871 posts, read 36,029,183 times
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In the Midwest, especially compared other regions of the US, conformity is a highly valued trait as well as an expectation of a solid work ethic. The social culture is very conservative in much of the region overall, particularly outside of the largest cities. It is not uncommon for people to get married right out of high school or college and have a strict "life plan" of church, job, family, relatives, etc. Also, the Midwest tends to be much more insular compared to other regions of the country and has less new people moving in and a higher percentage of residents that are natives to the state where they reside in.
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Old 07-21-2012, 06:31 PM
 
Location: not Chicagoland
1,202 posts, read 1,030,040 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ForYourLungsOnly View Post
It's very prevalent in the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic and South too.
Well for one this thread is only talking about the Midwest and commonality, not what sets it apart from other regions. Also, as has been shown, the Midwest is the main agricultural region (especially for corn and soybeans).

http://stuffaboutstates.com/agriculture/index.html
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Old 07-21-2012, 06:37 PM
 
Location: IN
20,871 posts, read 36,029,183 times
Reputation: 13324
Quote:
Originally Posted by plates View Post
Well for one this thread is only talking about the Midwest and commonality, not what sets it apart from other regions. Also, as has been shown, the Midwest is the main agricultural region (especially for corn and soybeans).

Total Agricultural Receipts Ranked by State from StuffAboutStates.com
Yes, GMO corn, soybeans, wheat, and everything else that is wrong with the commerical agricultural system in the US. We need smaller-scale localized agriculture that is more organic overall. The subsidies for things like ethanol and putting high fructose corn syrup as well as soybean oil in so many food items have got to stop.
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Old 07-21-2012, 07:30 PM
 
Location: not Chicagoland
1,202 posts, read 1,030,040 times
Reputation: 424
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
The fact that it takes money to get to the mountains or coast from there.
Well, there has to be some repercussions when leaving paradise.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Yes, GMO corn, soybeans, wheat, and everything else that is wrong with the commerical agricultural system in the US. We need smaller-scale localized agriculture that is more organic overall. The subsidies for things like ethanol and putting high fructose corn syrup as well as soybean oil in so many food items have got to stop.
Not that I necessarily disagree with you, but that is something completely different from this thread.

Last edited by plates; 07-21-2012 at 07:44 PM..
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Old 07-21-2012, 07:38 PM
 
Location: South Central Nebraska
350 posts, read 631,626 times
Reputation: 280
Quote:
Originally Posted by DesertFoxFan View Post
Why is it in some areas of the delta are moving away from cotton, and growing more corn, soybean?
Profit that's where the money is. I read in an ag magazine a couple months ago about farmers in the MS Delta now growing corn on thousands of acres and doing a lot better than with cotton. That was a new one to me but it makes sense to me.
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Old 07-21-2012, 07:39 PM
 
Location: South Central Nebraska
350 posts, read 631,626 times
Reputation: 280
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
The fact that it takes money to get to the mountains or coast from there.
Ouch.
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