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Old 07-26-2012, 05:35 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
45,081 posts, read 36,303,462 times
Reputation: 63814

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OK this is a word, not an accent, but I didn't realize till I moved to Texas, that some people actually think this is correct:

"You wanna help me move this chester drawers?" I mean, if you see an ad in the paper for used furniture, it often says, "One small chester drawer."

SHUT UP!!!!!!

Oh wait - it's not just in Texas apparently - go to eBay and type in "chester drawers" and about a brazillion of them will come up. SHEEZE!

chester drawers | eBay

Of course, eBay politely asks, "Do you mean CHEST OF DRAWERS?"


Errr, yeah. They PROLLY do! (eek!)

 
Old 07-26-2012, 06:29 PM
 
Location: Viña del Mar, Chile
16,411 posts, read 26,265,752 times
Reputation: 16497
Nothing worse than a Jersey or Boston accent.
 
Old 07-26-2012, 06:36 PM
 
10 posts, read 20,786 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by burgler09 View Post
Nothing worse than a Jersey or Boston accent.
I agree with that 100%. Both are awful.
 
Old 07-26-2012, 06:41 PM
 
Location: Purgatory
2,663 posts, read 4,546,093 times
Reputation: 3043
The valley girl type accent where the word "like" is mentioned several times in just one sentence.
 
Old 07-26-2012, 06:48 PM
 
Location: Viña del Mar, Chile
16,411 posts, read 26,265,752 times
Reputation: 16497
Quote:
Originally Posted by dragonborn View Post
The valley girl type accent where the word "like" is mentioned several times in just one sentence.

Isn't that just a stereotype.. ? I don't think that really exists.
 
Old 07-27-2012, 05:56 AM
 
10,391 posts, read 9,403,673 times
Reputation: 16017
I agree with those who detest hearing the word "like". The latest fad appears to be the word "yeah" used at the end of a sentence, as if the person is confirming their own statement.

Not an accent, but people who use the fake 'gravely' voice is irritating to me; their voice starts out fine but at the end of the sentence it turns gravely. What is with that?

An example from Youtube (both gravely voice and the word 'yeah'):
Gravely Voice Time - YouTube
 
Old 07-28-2012, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,229 posts, read 54,695,623 times
Reputation: 66713
Quote:
Originally Posted by old_cold View Post
Brooklyn/Jersey.
It's just too easy to associate the sound of anyone saying "Joyzee" with inner city denizens or gangsters

Boston area is soft and pleasant but difficult sometimes, to figure out.
Except that if you ever actually find a person from New Jersey who says, "Joyzee", please introduce me, because I've lived here for 54 years and have never once heard a New Jersey resident pronounce it that way. I concede that someone from Brooklyn might speak that way, but that old accent is dying out, too.

I think you watch way too many TV shows and movies.
 
Old 07-28-2012, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,229 posts, read 54,695,623 times
Reputation: 66713
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimboburnsy View Post
I can see how having to differentiate between a pin and an inkpin would be annoying, but having spent considerable time in East Texas my brain has learned to do the contextual math.

The accents that I have the most trouble with are the New England dialects in which a conversation involves excessive pantomime and the cadence is too fast. It doesn't matter if the speaker is on the phone or across the table; there is a lot of motion. Further, you'll miss some context if you aren't looking at them.

The WORST accent I've ever heard was a real coon-ass in Plaquemines Parish. I normally find the cajun dialects interesting and colorful, and I like the New Orleans "y'at" speak, but I understood about three words for every ten that this guy said. Don't ask for directions in Plaquemines Parish.

I spoke with a Scotsman in New York many years ago who was completely unintelligible. I thought he must be Finnish at first, but I didn't think that the rolled "R" was a component of the scandinavian languages.

I travelled to Australia in college and had a long conversation in a bar with an Ozzie about sports. At one point I asked him what position he played in "soccer". It took me about five minutes and numerous repetitions to realize that when he said "KOO-wee-per" he was actually saying "keeper".

If you recall a few years ago, a group of soldiers in the American-British coalition in Iraq were detained after they crossed over the border into Iran. The leader of the group was a Scotsman. The story I heard was that after a few attempts, the English-speaking Iranian in charge of the questioning requested that he speak to one of the lower-ranking members of the coalition that they had detained, because he couldn't understand the Scot's English at all.
 
Old 07-28-2012, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,229 posts, read 54,695,623 times
Reputation: 66713
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
AUGH - that drives me CRAZY! Also "umane" as in "It's the most umane thing to do."
I had a friend here in NJ who spent her first thirty years in Manhattan. When my daughter was a little girl, she said to me, "How come Aunt Sue says "rooned" when she means "ruined"? Her New York accent without the "R" was so pronounced that it almost sounded like a speech impediment. Even the Rs at the beginning of the words after a consonant; for example, a word like "French" had a half-"w" sound to them.

It is interesting how a significantly different way of speaking can show up in a mere 30-mile difference.
 
Old 07-28-2012, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Palm Beach Gardens, Fla
1,888 posts, read 7,153,558 times
Reputation: 1527
Anything from the northeast annoys me.......and I'm from the n.e. Probably wouldn't bother me if it were not for the fact that so many Floridians are from there so I'm hearing these over accentuated accents day in and day out. I'm pretty certain their accents have gotten worse once they've moved here. It's a phenomena in these parts Anyway, I had to laugh at the gravely voice YouTube video. I have also wondered about that recent trend of the "so...yeah". Thought I was the only one. It's funny how we notice little things about people's voices- from tone and cadence to accents and impediments. I used to work with a speech therapist at a clinic and we would have the most interesting conversations about this.
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