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Old 08-12-2012, 09:50 AM
 
Location: The South
5,233 posts, read 3,642,696 times
Reputation: 7936

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Fast talkers, from any region.

 
Old 08-12-2012, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,160 posts, read 54,630,432 times
Reputation: 66586
Quote:
Originally Posted by lammius View Post
The host? He's from St. Louis, Missouri, not New Jersey.
I wondered, because it's most certainly not HERE that people switch out the short 'e' for a short 'i' (saying pin/pen, tin/ten, etc. the same way). That one thing that drives me NUTS and I've bitched about it numerous times on City-Data, lol, as if people are going to change the way they speak for ME.
 
Old 08-12-2012, 10:20 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,160 posts, read 54,630,432 times
Reputation: 66586
Quote:
Originally Posted by 313Weather View Post
That's a hybrid Appalachia/Yooper/Canadian accent (Northern Cities Vowel Shift), not a New Jersey Accent.

Jay-Z has a strong New Jersey Accent, Judge Judy has a strong Brooklyn accent (they sound similar to me).
Why on earth would you say Jay-Z has a New Jersey accent? He grew up in Bedford-Stuyvesant, a depressed/high-crime section of Brooklyn.
 
Old 08-12-2012, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,160 posts, read 54,630,432 times
Reputation: 66586
There seems to often be a weird concept that the NJ accent is similar to the old-time Brooklyn accent, especially in the misconception that we drop our "R's". I see people referring to a "NY/NJ" accent, when they aren't the same at all.

Listen to both the teacher in the beginning and then Gov. Chris Christie. This is the "typical" NJ accent, particularly in North Jersey (South Jersey has a Philly influence.) All the "Rs" are in place. But I did hear the "yer" for "your" when the teacher was speaking! And "cawst" for "cost" (I know some other parts of the country say "cahst".)


Governor Christie Responds To Teacher During Town Hall - YouTube
 
Old 08-12-2012, 10:29 AM
 
7,238 posts, read 10,902,566 times
Reputation: 5583
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Why on earth would you say Jay-Z has a New Jersey accent? He grew up in Bedford-Stuyvesant, a depressed/high-crime section of Brooklyn.
If you want my honest opinion, the Brooklyn/Jersey accent sounds the same to me.
 
Old 08-12-2012, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,160 posts, read 54,630,432 times
Reputation: 66586
Quote:
Originally Posted by 313Weather View Post
If you want my honest opinion, the Brooklyn/Jersey accent sounds the same to me.
I find that very bizarre. Play the video I posted. That really sounds the same to you as a Brooklyn speaker? Someone from Brooklyn would say "Teachas", for one thing, lol. And "New Juhsie".
 
Old 08-12-2012, 10:31 AM
 
7,238 posts, read 10,902,566 times
Reputation: 5583
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
I find that very bizarre. Play the video I posted. That really sounds the same to you as a Brooklyn speaker?
Maybe it's just harder for someone who doesn't live in NJ/NY to tell the difference.
 
Old 08-12-2012, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,160 posts, read 54,630,432 times
Reputation: 66586
Quote:
Originally Posted by 313Weather View Post
Maybe it's just harder for someone who doesn't live in NJ/NY to tell the difference.
Maybe so, but I think the biggest and most obvious difference is that NY/Brooklyn drops the R at the end of and in the middle of words and NJ doesn't. I don't know how someone can't hear that. There is also some misconception out there based on what people hear in movies and on TV, evidenced by the fact that when a lot of people from NJ travel to other states, we invariably hear, "But you don't SOUND like you're from New Jersey." Um, yes, we do. We just don't sound like what you THINK we should sound like.
 
Old 08-12-2012, 10:41 AM
 
Location: alexandria, VA
9,546 posts, read 4,356,293 times
Reputation: 5313
People from Jersey towns close to NYC like Jersey City have an accent similar to the New York accent. They drop their Rs just like New Yorkers. I know a lady from the Greenville section of Jersey City and she has one of the heaviest "New York" accents I ever heard. But get away from the Hudson River towns and the accent starts to thin out into a typical mid-Atlantic accent (or non-accent).
 
Old 08-12-2012, 10:41 AM
 
7,238 posts, read 10,902,566 times
Reputation: 5583
I thought the New Jersey Accent was more like the accent Kyle's mom has on South Park (who is also apparently from New Jersey).


Blame Canada - South Park: Bigger Longer & Uncut (3/9) Movie CLIP (1999) HD - YouTube

Mike Tyson, on the other hand, was born/raised in Brooklyn and his accent is very similar to the above.


Mike Tyson Interview: Raw & Unfiltered - YouTube
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