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Old 08-12-2012, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,005 posts, read 54,523,130 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by r small View Post
People from Jersey towns close to NYC like Jersey City have an accent similar to the New York accent. They drop their Rs just like New Yorkers. I know a lady from the Greenville section of Jersey City and she has one of the heaviest "New York" accents I ever heard. But get away from the Hudson River towns and the accent starts to thin out into a typical mid-Atlantic accent (or non-accent).
^^Exactly. Jersey City and Bayonne sound very much like New York. I work with a woman from Bayonne, and she says "Yous".

 
Old 08-12-2012, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 313Weather View Post
I thought the New Jersey Accent was more like the accent Kyle's mom has on South Park (who is also apparently from New Jersey).


Blame Canada - South Park: Bigger Longer & Uncut (3/9) Movie CLIP (1999) HD - YouTube

Mike Tyson, on the other hand, was born/raised in Brooklyn and his accent is very similar to the above.


Mike Tyson Interview: Raw & Unfiltered - YouTube
LOL, that was funny, but no, Kyle's mom does not sound as if she's from NJ at all. Sort of proves my point, though, that most people's ideas about NJ are formed from TV and movies.

But after listening to that, listen to the video I posted with the NJ teacher speaking with the governor. Christie was born and raised in NJ. I'm guessing the teacher was, also. They both sound like typical NJ people. No need to listen to the whole thing, unless you are really interested in the whole Christie vs. the teacher's union mess!
 
Old 08-12-2012, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Atlanta & NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
Women with NY accents sound kind of cute, though.
Unless they're from Staten Island.
 
Old 08-12-2012, 11:12 AM
 
7,238 posts, read 10,891,939 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
LOL, that was funny, but no, Kyle's mom does not sound as if she's from NJ at all. Sort of proves my point, though, that most people's ideas about NJ are formed from TV and movies.

But after listening to that, listen to the video I posted with the NJ teacher speaking with the governor. Christie was born and raised in NJ. I'm guessing the teacher was, also. They both sound like typical NJ people. No need to listen to the whole thing, unless you are really interested in the whole Christie vs. the teacher's union mess!
Interesting.

I guess the only reason people in Northern NJ may have an NY accent is because they're so close to NY. Thing is majority of the folks in NJ live close to NY versus in South Jersey/near Philadelphia.



The more I research it, it doesn't appear NJ itself has a dominant accent, rather it's a blend of several different accents.
 
Old 08-12-2012, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Atlanta & NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 313Weather View Post
The more I research it, it doesn't appear NJ itself has a dominant accent, rather it's a blend of several different accents.
Yup. I have a friend from Jersey who's from Elizabeth and he has no accent whatsoever because he hasn't lived there in over 30 years, but his parents do and they're still living in Elizabeth. They have a NY accent.

But my other friend is from southern Jersey along the coast somewhere and you can't even tell if they have an accent. So it does vary. I imagine people from Camden would have a Philly type accent.
 
Old 08-12-2012, 11:31 AM
 
Location: alexandria, VA
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People from Elisabeth usually have a pretty heavy accent from what I've heard. Also towns like Bayonne, Hoboken, Weehawken, North Bergen, etc.
 
Old 08-12-2012, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Atlanta & NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by r small View Post
People from Elisabeth usually have a pretty heavy accent from what I've heard. Also towns like Bayonne, Hoboken, Weehawken, North Bergen, etc.
Yeah my friend's parents who live there definitely have a noticeable one.
 
Old 08-12-2012, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,005 posts, read 54,523,130 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 313Weather View Post
Interesting.

I guess the only reason people in Northern NJ may have an NY accent is because they're so close to NY. Thing is majority of the folks in NJ live close to NY versus in South Jersey/near Philadelphia.



The more I research it, it doesn't appear NJ itself has a dominant accent, rather it's a blend of several different accents.
I think that's well put. A feature of NJ is that there are a lot of people from elsewhere. For example, I grew up in northern NJ, about 30 miles northwest of Manhattan, maybe 10 miles south of the Rockland County (NY) line. I am fifth generation in my hometown (and I am 54 years old), so my family has lived there since the late 19th century, when it was farmland. They were pre-Ellis island immigrants, and we had little or no connection to New York whatsoever except for the occasional school field trip to a museum or something. The population of the area was mostly Dutch, English, German, etc. As a matter of fact, there once existed a dialect called Jersey Dutch that was a mix of old Dutch, Lenape, and English. It died out by the beginning of the 20th century, but it probably had an influence on the local speech.

In the late Sixties, after the race riots that occurred in so many US cities, "white flight" occurred in the inner cities, and hordes of people, mainly from the Bronx but also other parts of New York, swarmed to our area. They were of different ethnicities that hadn't been in the area in any quantity before--Italians, Irish, Polish, etc. (As a matter of fact, I can recall my Archie-Bunker-like grandfather bitching about all the Catholics who had moved to the area, lol.) These people talked funny, not only because they had New Yawk accents but also many had speech patterns and words indicative of their cultural heritages.

So, much of that probably blended in and influenced the local accents and language and continues to do so today as people from India and other parts of Asia move in.

Where I live now, about sixty miles south of my original home, many of the residents recently moved to NJ from Brooklyn and Staten Island, and bear the distinct New Yawk accent you hear on TV.

Further south, you hear the Philly-influenced accent.

The best part about all this mixing is the food. But the study of language and how it changes is always interesting.
 
Old 08-12-2012, 02:36 PM
 
Location: North West Northern Ireland.
20,695 posts, read 19,501,905 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
I think that's well put. A feature of NJ is that there are a lot of people from elsewhere. For example, I grew up in northern NJ, about 30 miles northwest of Manhattan, maybe 10 miles south of the Rockland County (NY) line. I am fifth generation in my hometown (and I am 54 years old), so my family has lived there since the late 19th century, when it was farmland. They were pre-Ellis island immigrants, and we had little or no connection to New York whatsoever except for the occasional school field trip to a museum or something. The population of the area was mostly Dutch, English, German, etc. As a matter of fact, there once existed a dialect called Jersey Dutch that was a mix of old Dutch, Lenape, and English. It died out by the beginning of the 20th century, but it probably had an influence on the local speech.

In the late Sixties, after the race riots that occurred in so many US cities, "white flight" occurred in the inner cities, and hordes of people, mainly from the Bronx but also other parts of New York, swarmed to our area. They were of different ethnicities that hadn't been in the area in any quantity before--Italians, Irish, Polish, etc. (As a matter of fact, I can recall my Archie-Bunker-like grandfather bitching about all the Catholics who had moved to the area, lol.) These people talked funny, not only because they had New Yawk accents but also many had speech patterns and words indicative of their cultural heritages.

So, much of that probably blended in and influenced the local accents and language and continues to do so today as people from India and other parts of Asia move in.

Where I live now, about sixty miles south of my original home, many of the residents recently moved to NJ from Brooklyn and Staten Island, and bear the distinct New Yawk accent you hear on TV.

Further south, you hear the Philly-influenced accent.

The best part about all this mixing is the food. But the study of language and how it changes is always interesting.
I guess the americans aren't any better.
 
Old 08-12-2012, 07:13 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,005 posts, read 54,523,130 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by owenc View Post
I guess the americans aren't any better.
Hope that was a joke.

My grandfather was prejudiced against just about everyone who wasn't the same as he was. Therefore, anyone of a different religion or a different race was suspect. He told my mother never to date an Italian because they all sleep with their daughters. He thought women should stay home and take care of the house and children and be content with that. I mean NEVER go out, except maybe to church. He was a nasty old man, and I remember feeling bad when I was thirteen and he died, because I wasn't sorry he was dead.

It hardly makes sense to draw any conclusions about how hundreds of millions of people in another country feel about Catholics based on this one guy who has been dead for forty years.
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