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Old 07-23-2012, 01:47 AM
 
5,128 posts, read 5,846,404 times
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The worst for me is a Jersey accent. Not too keen on a strong New York accent either.

Sarah Palin's accent is awful.

I can't make a blanket statement about southern accents because there are too many of them. I love the North Carolina Piedmont accent and the Virginia accent, which is almost nonexistent, but gentle. My grandparents were from Virginia and everyone thought they were from Canada. Virginians pronounce "house" and some other words similar to Canadians.

Not too crazy about some Deep South accents though.

 
Old 07-23-2012, 08:11 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,840 posts, read 36,186,607 times
Reputation: 63509
I love listening to a man with a Texas accent - especially when he's calling me Honey! MMMmmmmm! Keep drawing out those vowels in my ear, baby!

I also really like Virginia accents as well. They're an interesting mixture of Southern drawl with a slight hint of the British Isles.

The most interesting US accent to me is an authentic New Orleans accent.
 
Old 07-23-2012, 02:12 PM
 
53 posts, read 154,367 times
Reputation: 40
Brooklyn/Northern NJ and this:

Quote:
Originally Posted by 1greatcity View Post
Like, I don't know if it's an "accent" or not....but, like, OMG, I am like so totally OVER people who talk in like "Val Speak", you know, like So Cal teens did in like the 1980's. Like, make 'em stop fer shur!
Not sure if this speech pattern comes from CA or where but I have heard girls speak this way and it frankly makes them sound truly unintelligent, no matter who they are. I have no idea why they do this. I'm sure they must think it's sexy/cute. I'd be curious to know if there are any guys who are attracted to this.


Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
I absolutely HATE the severely affected pseudo "valley girl" accent that people who want to be "upper middle class" use. It's so incredibly phony and annoying.

20yrsinBranson
Is that 'dumb girl' speaking style known as 'valley girl'? I did not know that. At least I can now put a name to it. I always found it terribly annoying And yes, I've noticed it's mostly middle class/college girls using it and it does make them sound very fake, even if they may be telling the truth lol.
 
Old 07-23-2012, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,102 posts, read 54,581,442 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fallingwater View Post
I grew up in Michigan and never noticed an accent however I do find lots of people add an "s" on to the end of words that don't require one. I've caught myself doing it. Like "lets go to Walmarts" for an example.

I now live in Indiana and it drives me nuts to hear people say the word vehicle. Its Ve-hick-cle. They really emphasize the hick in the middle. I do IT over the phone and now talk to people all over the country. I am now noticing the various accents. A few people I work with are from Boston. One guy really plays it up, even drags out noises within the conversation like "ughhh..ye...ughhhhhh" sounds like he is dying or extremely tired. The worst accent I have found is probably individuals from the deep south. I helped a guy from Louisana a while back and I wanted to bash my head on the desk. I could barely understand a word he said.

The conversation was like this
Me: Hi, what is your name?
Client: wintin
Me: Im sorry did you say Quentin?
Client: meh
Me: Excuse me?
Client: meh, wintin, meh

This went on for sometime. Turns out his name was Clinton, meh was yes and so on. It was a horrible call. I spent more time going "Im sorry, could you repeat that?" I really wanted to say, "do you know how to speak?!!!" Now imagine trying to have him read off a model number or serial number when I can't even understand his freaking name. OMG what a nightmare. The easiest accent I have found are Texans. Its an accent but its low and drawn out. "Yesss, madammmm" My model nummmmber? Its fivveee, twoooo, RRRRR, ......... I never ever have to ask for a repeat and they are so darn polite!
I always thought people saying the "H" in "vehicle" was just a joke, then I heard people really speak that way.

And years ago I had a phone job where I had to call people and get them to renew their expired magazine subscriptions. There's a whole section out there in the middle of the country where the people end every conversation with "You bet."
 
Old 07-23-2012, 05:13 PM
 
Location: NEPA
2,010 posts, read 3,289,894 times
Reputation: 1954
New England and Northeast Pa
 
Old 07-23-2012, 05:33 PM
 
Location: Bay Area
1,520 posts, read 2,261,028 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by workaholics View Post
Ahh yes, the pin/pen merger. It's very common across the south. I was reading a linguist's blog once and she said that this was a surefire way to spot a southerner. A lot of us southerners don't think we have accents but this usually sticks out. She says that whenever she meets someone who says something like "Hi, I'm Bin (ben)" she says she'll automatically ask where in the south they're from and she's always right!
i can't stand that one either, but the people i knew that said it were either from the midwest or just had parents from the midwest. the other one that gets me is the NJ/NY habit of saying "uman" instead of "human". the dropped h comes up in all those words.
 
Old 07-23-2012, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Southeast, where else?
3,914 posts, read 4,225,187 times
Reputation: 5802
I dunno if this counts but, read it for what it is....someone quite some time ago (English Professor I believe) said that the most correct way to annunciate, articulate and accentuate the modern english vocablulary in the United States was in and around, Columbus Ohio.....her words, not mine...and she was from California....go figure....

This link tends to give the mid-west credit for this accuracy....like it or not, it's the least mangled version...if you will......me? I enjoy the dry (dur rye) inflections throughout the south...charming comes to mind and if applied properly, witty and downright beautiful.....

Don't shoot the messenger.....I think they mean the Mid-West traditional....Ohio, Indiana, Illinois but NOT Chicago (Sheee kahg gooo) or that Minnesota vibe.....eh......Michigan (lower) is in there as well....if you traveled or lived there you know what I mean, vowel shift notwithstanding.....it's.....bland....

The only thing I can remember being guilty about utilizing that speak was ending too many sentences with prepositions.....seemed perfectly normal at the time.......where are we eating...at? makes me whince now......what number can I call you at....."for" was an all too popular ending as well....BUT, for inflection, annunciation and accentuation, it doesn't get any more vanilla than up there....Indiana's dialect is right in line with their corn fields.....plain, flat, and orderly......for miles....and miles....

General American - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
Old 07-23-2012, 05:53 PM
 
Location: Cleveland
2,243 posts, read 3,463,628 times
Reputation: 3101
Michael Symon went to the Catholic high school down the street from the high school I attended. Everybody in that area talks like him.
 
Old 07-23-2012, 06:13 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,102 posts, read 54,581,442 times
Reputation: 66491
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5thgenSF View Post
i can't stand that one either, but the people i knew that said it were either from the midwest or just had parents from the midwest. the other one that gets me is the NJ/NY habit of saying "uman" instead of "human". the dropped h comes up in all those words.
I am NY/NJ and I don't say that, and I can't stand it, either. Not sure where that comes from, but I do know a woman who grew up in the city and she says it. Also "Yooge" for "Huge".
 
Old 07-23-2012, 07:26 PM
 
Location: Texas
5,070 posts, read 8,986,806 times
Reputation: 1632
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
I always thought people saying the "H" in "vehicle" was just a joke, then I heard people really speak that way.

And years ago I had a phone job where I had to call people and get them to renew their expired magazine subscriptions. There's a whole section out there in the middle of the country where the people end every conversation with "You bet."
I imagine that many police and patrolmen do that.
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