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View Poll Results: What region do Westerners resemble the most socially?
Midwesterners 11 37.93%
Northeasterners 5 17.24%
Southerners 4 13.79%
Canadians 9 31.03%
Voters: 29. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-21-2012, 08:36 AM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
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I live in the Southwest. I don't see a whole lot in common with the Southeast here. Texas creates a big buffer between them. The Southwest is it's own entity. Many natives I've met here in NM trace their ancestry back to the Native American, Spaniard and Mexican settlers from centuries back. Arizona seems to take more influence from California than anywhere else, though it still retains it's own identities in spite of the mass influx of transplants from everywhere.

Last edited by Desert_SW_77; 07-21-2012 at 08:45 AM..
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Old 07-21-2012, 11:43 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Yep. Best answer.
I third this! (as in what BCD mentioned). The "West" (if defined as the interior SW of New Mexico and Arizona and the Rocky Mountain and Pacific States) are, really, the living example of the classic "melting pot."

Southerners, Northeasterners, and Midwesterners flooded there after the WBTS and, save isolated enclaves/anamolies (such as far eastern New Mexico and Bakersfield, CA), there was really no dominating anglo influence in terms of regionalism. They didn't even become states until quite a bit later.

There are states that are "western" in terms of frontier and gunfights and cowtown and etc ...but not truly WESTERN states...as with a shared history/culture.

Like Texas and Kansas. Both are "western" states...but in the same sense Tennessee and Ohio are "eastern." states. At the bottom line, Texas was shaped powerfully by the influence of the American South, while Kansas was dominated by Midwestern forces. This is all something very different -- even if a post-bellum frontier era was shared -- than the mix and confluence of regional traits which formed the true American West (as defined by the Census Bureau).
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Old 07-21-2012, 12:04 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caphillsea77 View Post
I live in the Southwest. I don't see a whole lot in common with the Southeast here. Texas creates a big buffer between them. The Southwest is it's own entity. Many natives I've met here in NM trace their ancestry back to the Native American, Spaniard and Mexican settlers from centuries back. Arizona seems to take more influence from California than anywhere else, though it still retains it's own identities in spite of the mass influx of transplants from everywhere.
Absolutely right! Very well put.

There is a part of Texas (trans-pecos area) as is truly "Southwestern" in the mold of New Mexico and Arizona. It is even argruable/debatable that parts of far south Texas -- with an ever increasing native Mexican population, some legal, many not -- is becoming a bit SW. However, all in all, Texas is essentially Southern. Its "Southwestern" identity/affiliation is much more akin to that of the original definition of the "southwest.". Which literally meant the western part of the American South. Native and/or Spanish/Mexican culture never mattered much in terms of influence as to the evolution of Texas as an American state. It belonged to the South, right from the start.

On the other hand? New Mexico and Arizona had some minor Southern influences (mainly in far eastern NM, via Texas drifters and all), but it was Indians and Old Mexico that made for the primary role.

In terms of whole states? NM and AZ are the true Southwest. The Old Confederate States east of Texas are the "Southeast". Texas is the "western South"...a whole different "Southwest." Where the traits and basic elements of the South get blended with those of the frontier west.
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Old 07-21-2012, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Phoenix Arizona
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I've heard it said that the Southwest can be more friendly (like the South), and the Northwest can be a little less outgoing, polite, but colder than most (maybe like New England, maybe not, I'm not sure). I lot of Arizonans I've known who've tried out the Northwest told me it was really hard to make friends there, which is odd, because during my short time there I met a lot of really cool, friendly people. I don't know but if I had to guess, in the age before modern transportation and tv, I would think more people from the South travelled straight west to the SW than other parts of the West. Probably likewise for Northerners, going west meant the Northwest. Though a lot of early Mormon settlers in the 4 corners states were Northern.
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Old 07-22-2012, 07:15 AM
 
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My opinion:

Pacific Northwest (west of Cascades): Great Lakes Region of Midwest, particularly places like Wisconsin and Illinois. Many originally migrated from that area and have the accents and colloquialisms.

Coastal California: Northeast with a little midwest mixed in the Southern California area

Mountain West: They're an entity to themselves. They're not like any other region. However, socially, they're more alike the lower midwest than anything.

Desert southwest (AZ, S. NM, interior southern California): Outside of the biggest cities, they're more like the South than anything, socially speaking. The South without an accent.

Central Valley of California: Some areas are more like the south, others seem midwestern, while others seem like Mexico.
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Old 07-22-2012, 01:34 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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You mean the West like Los Angeles? Santa Fe? Seattle?

The West is far to big a region to reduce that way. I mean Roswell, NM is a lot like Texas. Seattle is a lot like Northeastern cities. Never the twain shall meet.
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Old 07-22-2012, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Santa Barbara, CA
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By and large, the midwest. But there are some northeastern and Canadian elements as well.

In parts of Montana we say 'youse guys' but otherwise we sound Canadian. There is a tinge of New Yawk-ese in the Butte accent.
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Old 07-22-2012, 02:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
I think coastal Westerners are pretty different to those in the inland, especially the Rockies. Folk in Denver seem similar to those in the Midwest. Denver seems like the Twin Cities. Phoenix seems like the South, California varies from being like the Northeast, to the Midwest to the South. The PNW is possibly the most Canadian part of the US socially speaking.
phoenix is more like los angeles than any city in the south.... and culturally almost identical to the cities that anchor the inland empire (riverside/san bernardino).

I think when it comes down to it, California whites are more similar to people from the midwest than the northeast. just go around asking transplants in los angeles/OC or san diego where they originally came from. On the other hand the bay area may be a totally different animal
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Old 07-23-2012, 03:29 AM
 
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It's a pretty large and diverse region. As someone already stated Denver is a different world from Seattle.
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