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Old 07-25-2012, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Quite a few are in the 50-200 range though.
which is middle of the range and NOT on the high end. I thought the top 10 would be Texas Cities based on the chatter I have heard. There is what 2, or 3 in the top 100?
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Old 07-25-2012, 11:11 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HtownLove View Post
which is middle of the range and NOT on the high end. I thought the top 10 would be Texas Cities based on the chatter I have heard. There is what 2, or 3 in the top 100?
Yeah, I think I saw 3. I think 2 were above the county I'm in, but it seems like Texas is on par with Upstate NY in that regard. As you know, Downstate NY skews the rate for the rest of the state. Lower home prices Upstate do as well.
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Old 07-26-2012, 06:18 AM
 
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When we moved to Birmingham, Alabama, we moved into a really nice suburb. Mountain Brook has a very high household income and one of the top twenty public school systems in the country according to some survey. The crime is almost non-existent, limited to the occasional public intoxication or someone's car getting vandalized. City services are very efficient and responsive.

Our house is 2,800 sf and sits on a 3/4-acre lot. We bought it on deal in 2006 from a contractor who was having money trouble and needed to sell immediately. $350,000.

When I got my property tax statement, I thought it was a misprint. $2700 a year, and that's the highest millage rate in Alabama. I have an uncle in Chicago who pays five times that for a house not much larger than mine and in a neighborhood not nearly as nice. It's crazy what people are willing to pay.
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Old 07-26-2012, 06:33 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
When we moved to Birmingham, Alabama, we moved into a really nice suburb. Mountain Brook has a very high household income and one of the top twenty public school systems in the country according to some survey. The crime is almost non-existent, limited to the occasional public intoxication or someone's car getting vandalized. City services are very efficient and responsive.

Our house is 2,800 sf and sits on a 3/4-acre lot. We bought it on deal in 2006 from a contractor who was having money trouble and needed to sell immediately. $350,000.

When I got my property tax statement, I thought it was a misprint. $2700 a year, and that's the highest millage rate in Alabama. I have an uncle in Chicago who pays five times that for a house not much larger than mine and in a neighborhood not nearly as nice. It's crazy what people are willing to pay.
Mountain Brook is a very new suburban community I've noticed too. From what I've seen, it looks similar to affluent communities in the Northeast and reminds me of Pittsford NY, which has similar economic demographics. mountain brook , al - Google Maps

pittsford, ny - Google Maps
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Old 07-26-2012, 08:13 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Quite a few are in the 50-200 range though.

I live in East Texas. My property taxes are fairly high, though not insane.

Keep in mind that we have no state income tax. We also enjoy a very low cost of living and our housing prices are extremely reasonable.

I mean, think how many years of the difference in property tax that paying $100,000 less for a home would pay for? In many place in the US, my home would cost well over $400,000.

I'm crying all the way to the bank.
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Old 07-26-2012, 08:15 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HtownLove View Post
which is middle of the range and NOT on the high end. I thought the top 10 would be Texas Cities based on the chatter I have heard. There is what 2, or 3 in the top 100?
Yes, and aren't those in large metro areas? I mean, Texas has five of the largest cities in the US.
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Old 07-26-2012, 08:21 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I live in East Texas. My property taxes are fairly high, though not insane.

Keep in mind that we have no state income tax. We also enjoy a very low cost of living and our housing prices are extremely reasonable.

I mean, think how many years of the difference in property tax that paying $100,000 less for a home would pay for? In many place in the US, my home would cost well over $400,000.

I'm crying all the way to the bank.
Except for the income tax, it is pretty much the same up here in terms of home prices and property taxes. It may be a little bit lower in terms of average home prices up here. I believe that overall COL is about the same or similar for Upstate NY and Texas. Even the average salaries are about the same for both: Northern California enjoys nation's highest salaries - The Business Journals=

Northern California enjoys nation's highest salaries - The Business Journals=
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Old 07-26-2012, 08:30 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
45,030 posts, read 36,268,604 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Except for the income tax, it is pretty much the same up here in terms of home prices and property taxes. It may be a little bit lower in terms of average home prices up here. I believe that overall COL is about the same or similar for Upstate NY and Texas. Even the average salaries are about the same for both: Northern California enjoys nation's highest salaries - The Business Journals=

Northern California enjoys nation's highest salaries - The Business Journals=
Without researching it, I wouldn't know. But as your point probably is, mine is that you can't go by property tax alone when looking at living expenses, though you certainly need to factor them in!

Here's a cool site that compares cost of living in different areas. You put in your area and your income and then choose another area to compare it to.
Moderator cut: link removed, linking to competitor sites is not allowed

Last edited by Yac; 08-02-2012 at 05:36 AM..
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Old 07-26-2012, 08:52 AM
 
11,179 posts, read 22,397,366 times
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One other thing, at least I know it applies here, is that normally people on the lower end of the spectrum tend to rent housing, and people with enough money and with good credit have the condos/houses and mortgages.

Our housing prices in Chicago are quite cheap. My nice one-bedroom condo along the north side lakefront is around $200,000 for 1,000 sf. On the coasts I know it would be multiple times that price. I pay 1%, so around $2,000 a year. That's about 2.2% of my salary.

The median income for a lot of those places includes a large portion of renters - especially in some of the larger older cities with a large % of apartment blocks. Chicago is over 50% renters. The median income for people who own houses in Cook County is probably much higher than the overall number. It would be the same for many places, but I'm guessing the impact on that stats is higher for older/denser areas that have historically had a ton of rentals.
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Old 07-26-2012, 10:33 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by citylove101 View Post
What you neglect to mention is what you actually GET in high tax areas. In NJ, for instance, overall you have great police protection--and enough of it--and one of the overall top eduation systems in the nation. One that is rivaled only by another high-tax state, Massachiusetts. (With its high taxes residents also get universal health care.)

By contrast, in many areras of the country (especially low-income ones, even in NJ) with low taxes you have the worst of both worlds: a low level of local services AND higher housing costs.

Yes, that won't hold true 100% of the time. But mostly it will. The problem isn't high property taxes. It's when you pay those taxes and get little or nothing of value in return.

The problem with high tax states like Massachusetts is most of the good universities are private, so you end up paying more for college tuition despite the high taxes you are already paying.
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