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Old 07-28-2012, 08:21 AM
 
Location: N26.03 W80.11
326 posts, read 828,257 times
Reputation: 326

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That sounds like a super fast but fun road trip. You must be young
Illinois can be pretty monotonous. I went to college in Southern Illinois and my apartment sat right next to corn/soybean fields. Like literally butting up to my windows.
You were really close to some truly beautiful areas. Missouri along the Missouri river and south is rolling and lush (when there's enough rain) full of forests and streams.
Michigan as you go north through the middle is trees, trees, and more trees, which can get a little monotonous too.
And there are actually parts of extreme southern Illinois where there are hills and trees believe it or not.



Quote:
Originally Posted by funkenstein91 View Post
I'll echo the words of a few others and say that you should have stopped in either Cleveland or Pittsburgh on your trip. Mostly just because reading "Cleveland wasn't terrible" on these boards fills my heart with joy.
I like Cleveland I've only been there a couple of times and it was during the summer so if I go in the dead of winter I might change my mind.
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Old 07-28-2012, 08:25 AM
 
Location: N26.03 W80.11
326 posts, read 828,257 times
Reputation: 326
Oh, and about crops you didn't see? They grow a lot of peaches in Illinois and cherries in Wisconsin.
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Old 07-28-2012, 08:51 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,315,951 times
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I guess I really need to take an East Coast trip and see what all of these exciting states look like! I've only been to the West and Midwest by car, and as East as State College, PA.
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Old 07-28-2012, 09:56 AM
 
5,819 posts, read 5,183,204 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Archguy View Post
Midwesterners may hate me for saying it, but I always say how glad I am that people are willing to live there and grow things for me to eat!
Are you under the impression that you "eat" the products of the corn and soybean fields which dominate agriculture in IL? Think again!

You spray the products, wipe your face with the products, eat OFF OF the products, drink the products (if you drink pop), eat other food which ate the products, and eat food CONTAINED IN the products - but people actually eat very little of what the OP saw. That's reality - I live and work on a farm which is a corn-soybean operation.

I'm with the other writers who say that if one just stays on the main roads and only stops at chain motels and restaurants one hasn't seen anything at all of ANY area through which one travels.

And what I always say, is that people who came over to America on the boat and just stayed on the east coast were the ones who were too stupid to realize that there were millions and millions of acres of land that could have been theirs if they weren't too lazy and ignorant to take advantage of the opportunity.

But I applaud the OP for not just staying in his own backyard on a vacation!
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Old 07-28-2012, 10:27 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,732,432 times
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Everywhere within 60 miles of the Ohio River from PA to the Mississippi is beautiful, charming country for the most part. Taking the interstate from Columbus to Indiana is a poor route since you are keeping the best part of the state, topographically, just out of sight over the southern horizon.

Other than that, I like the concept of an eastern Midwest tour. As a person with a coastal upbringing (NYC) I find myself in the minority having an appreciation of the region. Then again, Midwesterners don't always have much good to say about 'Back East' :-)
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Old 07-28-2012, 11:07 AM
 
Location: IN
20,848 posts, read 35,948,307 times
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Ohio is a very strange state because it has so much variety in such a short distance. I am not familiar with the area east of Columbus. Is it very Appalachian in character, more like WV? It appearss that the OP did go through part of that region (Cambridge).
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Old 07-28-2012, 12:05 PM
 
Location: SW Pennsylvania
821 posts, read 1,254,195 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Ohio is a very strange state because it has so much variety in such a short distance. I am not familiar with the area east of Columbus. Is it very Appalachian in character, more like WV? It appearss that the OP did go through part of that region (Cambridge).
Yeah pretty much. But it's more like northern WV/southwest PA though. Zanesville, Cambridge, Martin's Ferry, Steubenville, East Liverpool all included.. I wouldn't even hesitate to include the New Philadelphia/Dover area. Once you hit Canton/Akron, the landscape and accent changes.
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Old 07-28-2012, 12:07 PM
 
40 posts, read 48,292 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
Then, we went up into Michigan and spent the third night at Kalamazoo. Nothing to talk about here lol. The next day, we went to Cedar Point amusement park in Sandusky, OH. Awesome park, and awesome views of Lake Erie.


Why did you stop in Kalamazoo when you drove right past more interesting towns on Lake Michigan?
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Old 07-28-2012, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Midwest
600 posts, read 824,816 times
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I am glad you had a great experience on your trip. In 5 days, and with the amount of ground you covered, it was probably next to impossible to get off the interstates and explore, but that would have given you an even better idea of what the people were like. I know there are probably plenty of folks in the NE that wouldn't even have bothered to venture out like you did, so thanks for giving this area a chance!
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Old 07-29-2012, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,228,359 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2ForTheSea View Post
That sounds like a super fast but fun road trip. You must be young
Illinois can be pretty monotonous. I went to college in Southern Illinois and my apartment sat right next to corn/soybean fields. Like literally butting up to my windows.
You were really close to some truly beautiful areas. Missouri along the Missouri river and south is rolling and lush (when there's enough rain) full of forests and streams.
Michigan as you go north through the middle is trees, trees, and more trees, which can get a little monotonous too.
And there are actually parts of extreme southern Illinois where there are hills and trees believe it or not.





I like Cleveland I've only been there a couple of times and it was during the summer so if I go in the dead of winter I might change my mind.
Those aren't the only parts of the Midwest that are hilly. Iowa is not that flat, believe it or not. It is composed of rolling hills for the most part. Eastern Nebraska is pretty hilly as well. And Eastern Kansas is hilly too. Much of the western half of Illinois is quite hilly. Ohio, especially in the eastern half, is pretty hilly, as well as southern Ohio. Southern Indiana is also hilly. Pretty much along the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers, the Midwest is not really that flat. Duluth, MN is very hilly, and much of Wisconsin is quite hilly. Even Chicago's northern suburbs are actually pretty hilly, particularly around Waukegan. The Midwest does have its flat as a pancake portions, but more of it IMO could be described as at minimum gently rolling hills. Even the flat-as-a-board cities have some hills. Examples of several Midwest cities that are not flat in all areas...Omaha, Des Moines, Kansas City, St. Louis, Cincinnati, and Cleveland (particularly East Cleveland). I can't speak for Milwaukee, but I would be willing to bet that if Waukegan is hilly, then so is Milwaukee, since it's a mere hour to the north. The UP of Michigan is mountainous, and Northern Wisconsin is hilly as well.

Duluth, Minnesota may be one of the hilliest cities in the U.S.
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