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View Poll Results: New York City is more associated with:
New Jersey & Connecticut 98 93.33%
Upstate New York 7 6.67%
Voters: 105. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-14-2012, 01:59 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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I grew up in Westchester which is indisputably NOT upstate even if "Mad New Yorkers" think it is. Just because Mad New Yorkers are extremely provincial and have a very limited and insular view of regional geography does not make them the arbiters of what and what isn't 'Upstate'.

Having grown up, worked, studied, and befriended people from LI to Watertown to Buffalo, I have my own perspective on New York's geography, but it will just be swamped by Manhattanites that think that Upstate is anywhere out of sight of the Empire State Building, and Upstaters who think Westchester is a 'fast-paced' alternative for people not cool enough to live in Brooklyn, and not just another suburbia/exurbia much like the one's surrounding their own upstate cities.

I will say this to stir the pot, though, why not?: Upstate, east of CNY, and downstate have more in common as being part of the core of the broader 'Northeast' than Western New York which is transitional to the Great Lakes/upper Midwest.

I'll even go as far as to say that the Lower Hudson Valley has more in common with southern New England than anything else.
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Old 08-14-2012, 03:13 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
I grew up in Westchester which is indisputably NOT upstate even if "Mad New Yorkers" think it is. Just because Mad New Yorkers are extremely provincial and have a very limited and insular view of regional geography does not make them the arbiters of what and what isn't 'Upstate'.

Having grown up, worked, studied, and befriended people from LI to Watertown to Buffalo, I have my own perspective on New York's geography, but it will just be swamped by Manhattanites that think that Upstate is anywhere out of sight of the Empire State Building, and Upstaters who think Westchester is a 'fast-paced' alternative for people not cool enough to live in Brooklyn, and not just another suburbia/exurbia much like the one's surrounding their own upstate cities.

I will say this to stir the pot, though, why not?: Upstate, east of CNY, and downstate have more in common as being part of the core of the broader 'Northeast' than Western New York which is transitional to the Great Lakes/upper Midwest.

I'll even go as far as to say that the Lower Hudson Valley has more in common with southern New England than anything else.
I don't count Westchester as upstate either. I don't know why this turned into a 'where is upstate' debate. The question was, do you associate NYC with NJ/CT or upstate NY? Clearly the answer is NJ/CT because it's part of the tri state area and makes up most of the NY metro area, especially NJ. I don't even know why this is being debated. People in Rochester don't associate themselves with NYC, neither do people from Syracuse or Buffalo, and I'm gonna go out a limb and say neither do people from Albany. To me and most other metro area people, those cities are upstate. There.
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Old 08-14-2012, 03:55 PM
Status: "Be yourself. What's the alternative?" (set 19 days ago)
 
8,692 posts, read 10,842,175 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
People in Rochester don't associate themselves with NYC, neither do people from Syracuse or Buffalo, and I'm gonna go out a limb and say neither do people from Albany. To me and most other metro area people, those cities are upstate. There.
This. And, if people from these areas was put in the middle of anywhere USA, no one would recognize them as stereotypical NY'ers or Manhattanites. Does anyone think that city people in anyways resemble small city, rural or country people from NY or any other state for that matter ? I can tell the difference in a NY minute. Mannerisms, expressions, the way people walk, talk, dress, clothing, everything.

Last edited by Nanny Goat; 08-14-2012 at 04:06 PM..
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Old 08-14-2012, 04:12 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Upstate Nancy View Post
This. And, if people from these areas was put in the middle of anywhere USA, no one would recognize them as stereotypical NY'ers or Manhattanites. Does anyone think that city people in anyways resemble small city, rural or country people from NY or any other state for that matter ? I can tell the difference in a NY minute. Mannerisms, expressions, the way people walk, talk, dress, clothing, everything.
Exactly. Upstate NY is beautiful, but has a very, very different vibe from the city and even suburban/urban areas in the metro. Totally different. Especially driving through the small towns and villages, NYC doesn't even cross your mind! Other than living in the same state, people from upstate and the city area have nothing in common unless they are originally from one area and moved to the other.
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Old 08-14-2012, 07:06 PM
 
115 posts, read 84,352 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
I grew up in Westchester which is indisputably NOT upstate even if "Mad New Yorkers" think it is. Just because Mad New Yorkers are extremely provincial and have a very limited and insular view of regional geography does not make them the arbiters of what and what isn't 'Upstate'.

Having grown up, worked, studied, and befriended people from LI to Watertown to Buffalo, I have my own perspective on New York's geography, but it will just be swamped by Manhattanites that think that Upstate is anywhere out of sight of the Empire State Building, and Upstaters who think Westchester is a 'fast-paced' alternative for people not cool enough to live in Brooklyn, and not just another suburbia/exurbia much like the one's surrounding their own upstate cities.

I will say this to stir the pot, though, why not?: Upstate, east of CNY, and downstate have more in common as being part of the core of the broader 'Northeast' than Western New York which is transitional to the Great Lakes/upper Midwest.

I'll even go as far as to say that the Lower Hudson Valley has more in common with southern New England than anything else.
Yeah, but heres the thing:

Upstate is a loose definition of a specific area. There are no clear boundaries. In NYC, its anything north of the Bronx. If you live in Westchester, you dont consider yourself Upstate, etc.

Who is right, here? Nobody.

The majority however, that being NYC, since the entire basis for the definition stems from the city, think Westchester is Upstate.

Also, I dont know any Upstate people from any of the cities that would consider Westchester a "fast-paced" alternative. Its Brooklyn or bust. Nobody settles for Westchester for the city. People I know that go to Purchase say its too far. Sure, its close to the city, but if youre going to the city, its just a place you go through, if you dont go through Jersey.

Mohawk Valley (Utica to Albany), and the Hudson Valley (Albany to Westchester) are certainly more New England/Northeast as a broad term.

I do agree there. Syracuse to WNY, more transitional to the Midwest/Great Lakes, however, find any Midwesterner who agrees. Good luck. Western NY is still Northeast to them, as is Pittsburgh.

The accents in Lower Hudson Valley a lot of the time are also more New England, I find.

There are a lot of NY/NE accent hybrids.
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Old 08-14-2012, 07:09 PM
 
115 posts, read 84,352 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
I don't count Westchester as upstate either. I don't know why this turned into a 'where is upstate' debate. The question was, do you associate NYC with NJ/CT or upstate NY? Clearly the answer is NJ/CT because it's part of the tri state area and makes up most of the NY metro area, especially NJ. I don't even know why this is being debated. People in Rochester don't associate themselves with NYC, neither do people from Syracuse or Buffalo, and I'm gonna go out a limb and say neither do people from Albany. To me and most other metro area people, those cities are upstate. There.

Rochester/Buffalo is not Upstate NY, its Western, and no, theyre not the same thing, which is why definition is being debated.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_New_York
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Old 08-14-2012, 07:10 PM
 
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Originally Posted by JohnnyMotts View Post
Rochester/Buffalo is not Upstate NY, its Western, and no, theyre not the same thing.
Whatever. Point is, they don't associate with NYC. People around here don't consider them to be associated with NYC because they're too far.
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Old 08-14-2012, 07:16 PM
 
115 posts, read 84,352 times
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Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
Whatever. Point is, they don't associate with NYC. People around here don't consider them to be associated with NYC because they're too far.
I spent a semester at SUNY Brockport outside Rochester. People from Buffalo and Rochester were adamant to other people from around the state that they are Western NY, not Upstate.

The OP needed to be more specific.
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Old 08-14-2012, 07:18 PM
 
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Originally Posted by JohnnyMotts View Post
The OP needed to be more specific.
Isn't western NY even further from the city than most of upstate? In that case, what's it matter what the OP meant? You truly cannot deny that the place immediately across the river from NYC associates more with it than places 2+ hours away. Come on now.
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Old 08-14-2012, 07:21 PM
 
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The biggest difference I find aside lifestyle is accents.

Northern Vowel Shift/Inland North.




The weird thing is, Utica is always on the brink. Its definitely the point (if traveling Eastbound) where it starts to look and feel more New Englandish. The accent as well.

Utica is on the very eastern edge of the shade of blue.

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