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Old 07-29-2012, 08:21 PM
 
Location: Atlanta & NYC
6,620 posts, read 11,692,352 times
Reputation: 6603

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nightmareCROW View Post
Hello everyone~
I'm new to the forums, and would like some advice. I currently live in North Carolina and have lived here for ten years now. To be honest, I'm sooo sick of the weather here and would like to consider living somewhere else in the next couple of years. I am looking for an area in either Northeastern states, states bordering Montana, and Washington, and possibly Alaska. Preferably temperatures in the summer around 70 degrees fahrenheit, and 20 degrees and above for the winter months. As much as I love snow, I don't want to live in an area with a lot of snowfall because I would be afraid of driving in it. Beautiful scenery (mountains, lakes, etc) is a definite requirement. I would prefer to live in a small populated area. Any ideas, please?
You wouldn't want to live right in Washington? I think a move from NC to AK would be too much of a shock, for me anyway (the whole daylight thing they have going on there would bug the crap outta me).
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Old 07-29-2012, 08:33 PM
 
Location: The Old Dominion
774 posts, read 1,425,926 times
Reputation: 1172
Quote:
Originally Posted by plates View Post
The Oregon Coast would work. The yearly temperatures range from mid 30s to mid 60s.
Quote:
Originally Posted by lentzr View Post
If you do not like heavy snowfall, let me suggest Washington State.
Quote:
Originally Posted by callmemaybe View Post
I think you'd love the Pacific Northwest!
Yes! Here is your good advice! Actually anywhere near the coast including California will suit you. ALL other places in the continental US have blistering hot summers and/or bitter cold winters. MOST other places in the lower 48 have BOTH!
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Old 07-29-2012, 08:36 PM
 
1,446 posts, read 4,059,724 times
Reputation: 966
Quote:
Thank you for your very informative post. I never knew that the ocean currents had an impact to the local climate, and being close to the ocean sounds really appealing to me. I've heard many good things regarding Seattle, and did some research about the surrounding areas around the city. I don't necessarily mind the chill during the winter months since that should be expected, but in the summer, anything above 90 degrees is just a bit too uncomfortable to deal with, especially if there is humidity combined with the heat. Is there any areas around Seattle that you would personally recommend?
No problem. I am happy to help out. However, I need to know more about what you are looking for in a community to advise you further. Do you want small town or big city? What kind of income level are you looking for in a community? What amenities or access are you looking for? I am sure you will be able to find something suitable in Washington state. Just remember, it may not snow that much in Seattle but it does drizzle quite a bit!
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Old 07-29-2012, 09:50 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,331,245 times
Reputation: 4270
Quote:
Originally Posted by cittic10 View Post
Chrissakes, the heat will break in a month or two.

The best place to escape the heat is in your own backyard, western north carolina. It can be 95 degrees but once you get up to about 4500' elevation, you'll be in the upper 60's.

You don't want snow and I'm guessing you probably don't want sub zero temps or having a summer that only lasts a month, that pretty much limits you to the pacific northwest. If you can afford to live there, then congrats but you probably won't like that either because it never really warms up. And what good is the nice temps if you can't go out because it's raining?

Go camping in WNC immediately. For a week.
Believe me, I know how you feel. Just trust me on this one.

Usable days... that's what to look for.
Eastern NC may have less usable days in summer but more in winter, spring and fall. Find a weather almanac and compare against alaska, montana, etc. You'll see.
Right.....when people are sick of the cold in the winter, that's okay, but if somebody gets sick of the heat in the summer they're being irrational or impatient?
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Old 07-29-2012, 10:16 PM
 
Location: Santa Barbara, CA
1,154 posts, read 3,969,972 times
Reputation: 702
States bordering Montana... why not Montana itself? Some of the lowest valleys get less snow than even Chicago or Boston. If you live around Missoula or Kalispell you won't drop below zero very often and when you do it won't be the -30 type stuff the rest of the state gets.
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Old 07-29-2012, 10:19 PM
 
Location: The Old Dominion
774 posts, read 1,425,926 times
Reputation: 1172
Default ^^^

Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
Right.....when people are sick of the cold in the winter, that's okay, but if somebody gets sick of the heat in the summer they're being irrational or impatient?

Monterey's Weather Pattern
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Old 07-30-2012, 12:47 AM
 
Location: Seattle, Washington
3,733 posts, read 6,491,999 times
Reputation: 1989
Port Angeles! (Or Sequim) Buy something in the hills just outside of town for better chances of snow in the winter.
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Old 07-30-2012, 12:49 AM
 
Location: Seattle, Washington
3,733 posts, read 6,491,999 times
Reputation: 1989
Port Angeles, Washington - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sequim, Washington - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 07-30-2012, 04:40 AM
 
8,751 posts, read 10,874,325 times
Reputation: 12804
Quote:
Originally Posted by nightmareCROW View Post
I've heard a lot of people looking for the heat as well. I do understand why, but often times humidity accompanies the heat and makes it very unbearable to deal with. Poughkeepsie seems very nice, along with the surrounding areas. How far north would you have to go away from New York City for housing prices to be reasonable?






Thank you for your very informative post. I never knew that the ocean currents had an impact to the local climate, and being close to the ocean sounds really appealing to me. I've heard many good things regarding Seattle, and did some research about the surrounding areas around the city. I don't necessarily mind the chill during the winter months since that should be expected, but in the summer, anything above 90 degrees is just a bit too uncomfortable to deal with, especially if there is humidity combined with the heat. Is there any areas around Seattle that you would personally recommend?
Depends on what you set as reasonable. Downstate is expensive.
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Old 07-30-2012, 07:56 AM
 
Location: ๏̯͡๏﴿ Gwinnett-That's a Civil Matter-County
2,117 posts, read 5,333,354 times
Reputation: 3518
Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
Right.....when people are sick of the cold in the winter, that's okay, but if somebody gets sick of the heat in the summer they're being irrational or impatient?
Most people care about weather because they want to spend time outdoors.
At least that's why I care about it.
In fact, that's why I've been comparing weather with a bunch of different states for few years now.

Spending time outdoors is splendid when it's 60-70 degrees and dry. Perhaps a little cooler as long as it's sunny. Then you can leave the windows open and if it's dry, get natural air conditioning.

Also consider that a high temp of 70 in the summer will most likely start out in the morning upper 40's (too cold to leave the windows open at night) and spend a better part of the morning in the 50's and dip back down into chilly territory around dinner time. There's nothing wrong with prefering cool or cold weather but usually when people get fed up with the heat in the south, they don't consider that anything less than room temperature isn't comfortable either.

Sure, during the month of July, northern Montana might have a high of 72 degrees and that is absolutely glorious. But in October when it's 72 in North Carolina and it's 32 in Montana, where do you suppose the OP will want to be then?

Rather than make a huge mistake moving half way around the world to find out the hard way, I thought I'd suggest checking the almanac and comparing for usable weather days. Chances are the OP'll have a much greater appreciation for their climate once they do.

I'll grant you that the PNW has a lot of useable weather days (if you're willing to don rain gear) and the OP will find this out by checking the weather stats but they'll also learn that the Washington is not immune to heat waves where it gets into the 90's and 100's too and sometimes they stick around for a while. And I'm not just talking about the eastern part of the state...
2009 Pacific Northwest heat wave - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

There's also ways to mitigate the heat, such as living in a home that's shaded by trees and one that's designed to be energy efficient to cool with air conditioners, fans and natural cooling. The humidity is tough but seattle can write the book about humidity. High humidity on cool days isn't pleasant either.
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