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Old 07-29-2012, 02:18 PM
 
2 posts, read 3,670 times
Reputation: 10

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Hello everyone~
I'm new to the forums, and would like some advice. I currently live in North Carolina and have lived here for ten years now. To be honest, I'm sooo sick of the weather here and would like to consider living somewhere else in the next couple of years. I am looking for an area in either Northeastern states, states bordering Montana, and Washington, and possibly Alaska. Preferably temperatures in the summer around 70 degrees fahrenheit, and 20 degrees and above for the winter months. As much as I love snow, I don't want to live in an area with a lot of snowfall because I would be afraid of driving in it. Beautiful scenery (mountains, lakes, etc) is a definite requirement. I would prefer to live in a small populated area. Any ideas, please?
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Old 07-29-2012, 02:40 PM
Status: "Be yourself. What's the alternative?" (set 16 days ago)
 
8,675 posts, read 10,831,402 times
Reputation: 12722
Funny, most are looking for heat. I know what you mean because I've lived in a hot climate for 20 years. It gets boring and redundant. Hehe. Areas south of Poughkeepsie in NY state the snow doesn't stick too much for too long, on average. Maybe little towns around there might work for you? If you go too far down, though, it gets more expensive.
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Old 07-29-2012, 03:17 PM
 
1,446 posts, read 4,053,801 times
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If you do not like heavy snowfall, let me suggest Washington State. It does get somewhat cold in the winter, but it is not as cold as Alaska or Montana. These states are colder with more snowfall in the winter. The reason for this is that there are ocean currents that moderate the climate in both the winter and summer along the NW Pacific Coast. Therefore, it is not that cold in the winter and not that hot. If you go further inland, like in Montana or inland Alaska, it is definitely pretty brutal in the winter, but do realize it can also rise to above 90 degrees in the summer. For example, Fairbanks might be brutally cold during the winter, cool summer nights, but the temperature will rise above 90 during the summer that far inland. As for Anchorage or the SE part of the state, it is cold in the winter, but not that cold due to the ocean currents. However, the summers may be more pleasant than further inland. However, I am not so sure about snowfall in Anchorage. So if you want cold, but do not like heavy snowfall, let me suggest the closer you are to Seattle/Portland area, the better you will like the weather.
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Old 07-29-2012, 04:06 PM
 
1,245 posts, read 2,985,315 times
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Try upstate New York. Thanks to global warming, the last few winters haven't been so harsh.
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Old 07-29-2012, 04:38 PM
 
2 posts, read 3,670 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Upstate Nancy View Post
Funny, most are looking for heat. I know what you mean because I've lived in a hot climate for 20 years. It gets boring and redundant. Hehe. Areas south of Poughkeepsie in NY state the snow doesn't stick too much for too long, on average. Maybe little towns around there might work for you? If you go too far down, though, it gets more expensive.

I've heard a lot of people looking for the heat as well. I do understand why, but often times humidity accompanies the heat and makes it very unbearable to deal with. Poughkeepsie seems very nice, along with the surrounding areas. How far north would you have to go away from New York City for housing prices to be reasonable?



Quote:
Originally Posted by lentzr View Post
If you do not like heavy snowfall, let me suggest Washington State. It does get somewhat cold in the winter, but it is not as cold as Alaska or Montana. These states are colder with more snowfall in the winter. The reason for this is that there are ocean currents that moderate the climate in both the winter and summer along the NW Pacific Coast. Therefore, it is not that cold in the winter and not that hot. If you go further inland, like in Montana or inland Alaska, it is definitely pretty brutal in the winter, but do realize it can also rise to above 90 degrees in the summer. For example, Fairbanks might be brutally cold during the winter, cool summer nights, but the temperature will rise above 90 during the summer that far inland. As for Anchorage or the SE part of the state, it is cold in the winter, but not that cold due to the ocean currents. However, the summers may be more pleasant than further inland. However, I am not so sure about snowfall in Anchorage. So if you want cold, but do not like heavy snowfall, let me suggest the closer you are to Seattle/Portland area, the better you will like the weather.

Thank you for your very informative post. I never knew that the ocean currents had an impact to the local climate, and being close to the ocean sounds really appealing to me. I've heard many good things regarding Seattle, and did some research about the surrounding areas around the city. I don't necessarily mind the chill during the winter months since that should be expected, but in the summer, anything above 90 degrees is just a bit too uncomfortable to deal with, especially if there is humidity combined with the heat. Is there any areas around Seattle that you would personally recommend?
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Old 07-29-2012, 04:45 PM
 
56,535 posts, read 80,824,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeromeville View Post
Try upstate New York. Thanks to global warming, the last few winters haven't been so harsh.
Yup, places in the I-87 corridor from say Glens Falls to Plattsburgh may work due to the proximity to Lake Champlain, being sparsely populated, is close to the Adirondack Mountains, getting less snow that other parts of Upstate NY(around 60-70 inches, if not less near Plattsburgh) and it is in between some bigger and even world class cities within a reasonable drive for day trips. Since snow is expected, communities prepare for it and it tends to get cleared in a timely manner.

Here's some information on some of the places within that area mentioned: Glens Falls is full of things to do, delicious restaurants, and numerous places to shop for everyone in your family or friends.
Glens Falls, NY - Official Website
Glens Falls, New York - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


City of Plattsburgh
Plattsburgh North Country Chamber of Commerce
Plattsburgh (city), New York - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ticonderoga Area Chamber of Commerce
Town of Ticonderoga
Ticonderoga, New York - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Port Henry - Moriah
Moriah, New York - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Elizabethtown, NY | Official Town Website
Visit Elizabethtown NY - Enjoy Hiking Trails, Spectacular Scenery, and A Piece of History in Elizabethtown NY
Elizabethtown, New York - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

PortKent.org
Port Kent, New York - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Keeseville, New York - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Au Sable, New York - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Ausable Chasm
Chesterfield, New York - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
AuSable Valley Region Guide: Jay NY, Wilmington, Keeseville & AuSable Forks In The Adirondacks

RealtyUSA - Property - Property-List

Fesette Realty, LLC - Homes in Plattsburgh NY (Look in Essex and Clinton Counties)

Average Weather for Plattsburgh, NY - Temperature and Precipitation

Average Weather for Glens Falls, NY - Temperature and Precipitation

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 07-29-2012 at 04:53 PM..
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Old 07-29-2012, 06:19 PM
 
Location: not Chicagoland
1,202 posts, read 1,026,715 times
Reputation: 424
Quote:
Originally Posted by nightmareCROW View Post
Hello everyone~
I'm new to the forums, and would like some advice. I currently live in North Carolina and have lived here for ten years now. To be honest, I'm sooo sick of the weather here and would like to consider living somewhere else in the next couple of years. I am looking for an area in either Northeastern states, states bordering Montana, and Washington, and possibly Alaska. Preferably temperatures in the summer around 70 degrees fahrenheit, and 20 degrees and above for the winter months. As much as I love snow, I don't want to live in an area with a lot of snowfall because I would be afraid of driving in it. Beautiful scenery (mountains, lakes, etc) is a definite requirement. I would prefer to live in a small populated area. Any ideas, please?
The Oregon Coast would work. The yearly temperatures range from mid 30s to mid 60s.
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Old 07-29-2012, 06:25 PM
 
1,512 posts, read 7,265,914 times
Reputation: 1122
Quote:
Originally Posted by nightmareCROW View Post
Hello everyone~
I'm new to the forums, and would like some advice. I currently live in North Carolina and have lived here for ten years now. To be honest, I'm sooo sick of the weather here and would like to consider living somewhere else in the next couple of years. I am looking for an area in either Northeastern states, states bordering Montana, and Washington, and possibly Alaska. Preferably temperatures in the summer around 70 degrees fahrenheit, and 20 degrees and above for the winter months. As much as I love snow, I don't want to live in an area with a lot of snowfall because I would be afraid of driving in it. Beautiful scenery (mountains, lakes, etc) is a definite requirement. I would prefer to live in a small populated area. Any ideas, please?
Antartica??
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Old 07-29-2012, 06:32 PM
 
Location: ๏̯͡๏﴿ Gwinnett-That's a Civil Matter-County
2,117 posts, read 5,319,859 times
Reputation: 3517
Chrissakes, the heat will break in a month or two.

The best place to escape the heat is in your own backyard, western north carolina. It can be 95 degrees but once you get up to about 4500' elevation, you'll be in the upper 60's.

You don't want snow and I'm guessing you probably don't want sub zero temps or having a summer that only lasts a month, that pretty much limits you to the pacific northwest. If you can afford to live there, then congrats but you probably won't like that either because it never really warms up. And what good is the nice temps if you can't go out because it's raining?

Go camping in WNC immediately. For a week.
Believe me, I know how you feel. Just trust me on this one.

Usable days... that's what to look for.
Eastern NC may have less usable days in summer but more in winter, spring and fall. Find a weather almanac and compare against alaska, montana, etc. You'll see.
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Old 07-29-2012, 07:23 PM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
1,328 posts, read 2,648,355 times
Reputation: 815
I think you'd love the Pacific Northwest! The rain there is actually kind of nice, as long as the cloudiness doesn't make you depressed (I think I have SAD as a result of the sun), I think you'd like it. It's a light rain most of the time, except on the coast where it's more intense, because the Coast Ranges reduce the intensity of the storms.
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