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Old 08-04-2012, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,509 posts, read 28,206,148 times
Reputation: 7599

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Octa View Post
Yeah I guess it depends on how Houston tries to cut back on sprawl and reverse it. The reason Houston has become attractive outside of the weather and jobs is the cheap price of housing in the surrounding suburbs. If development continues to go further out from the area increasing commute times along with higher energy prices then it could see its growth begin to slow down or stagnate as people choose other sunbelt cities over Houston for the same reason they originally liked Houston.
Dude you have no idea what you are talking about. 700,000 people moved to the core county last decade.

Furthermore, Houston has multiple job centers, the people are moving further out chasing the jobs not for cheaper housing. stick to what you know about. Housing in the far suburbs like The Woodlands, Cypress, Cinco Ranch are hella expensive. Cheaper Housing? you nuts???

The Woodlands is far out in North Houston and it has boomed because it has tons of Jobs there. People have moved to Pearland because there are tons of jobs at TMC. People have moved west because of the Energy Corridor, and West Chase. You are acting like people have to travel downtown and only downtown to work. Please, there are 13 business districts in Houston, wise people live where they work. Common sense.

You think all the thousands of people from Exxon that will be moving to the Woodlands in the next few years from Virginia are moving there to work Downtown? Don't be silly, they will be moving there to work at Exxon IN the Woodlands.

Only Idiots would move clear across the metro from where they work
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Old 08-04-2012, 02:24 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,658 posts, read 27,108,274 times
Reputation: 9591
Quote:
Originally Posted by blkgiraffe View Post
Dallas location isn't ideal though in terms of longevity. It'll become stagnant like Chicago. It's even worse because Chicago at least sits along Lake Michigan. All Dallas has is its good looks and a big ditch.
Chicago's stagnation had very little to do with its inland location. It's still the transportation hub of the country anyway. Just saying. Dallas stagnation won't happen because of its inland location either.
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Old 08-04-2012, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,509 posts, read 28,206,148 times
Reputation: 7599
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Chicago's stagnation had very little to do with its inland location. It's still the transportation hub of the country anyway. Just saying. Dallas stagnation won't happen because of its inland location either.
why will it happen then?
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Old 08-04-2012, 02:40 PM
 
1,356 posts, read 1,638,531 times
Reputation: 1035
Quote:
Originally Posted by HtownLove View Post
Dude you have no idea what you are talking about. 700,000 people moved to the core county last decade.

Furthermore, Houston has multiple job centers, the people are moving further out chasing the jobs not for cheaper housing. stick to what you know about. Housing in the far suburbs like The Woodlands, Cypress, Cinco Ranch are hella expensive. Cheaper Housing? you nuts???

The Woodlands is far out in North Houston and it has boomed because it has tons of Jobs there. People have moved to Pearland because there are tons of jobs at TMC. People have moved west because of the Energy Corridor, and West Chase. You are acting like people have to travel downtown and only downtown to work. Please, there are 13 business districts in Houston, wise people live where they work. Common sense.

You think all the thousands of people from Exxon that will be moving to the Woodlands in the next few years from Virginia are moving there to work Downtown? Don't be silly, they will be moving there to work at Exxon IN the Woodlands.

Only Idiots would move clear across the metro from where they work
I'm not talking about past growth. I'm talking about future growth. Houstons growth rate isn't sustainable at the current level because it has inadequate infrastructure, inadequate public transportation, terrible traffic, and has made inefficient use of it's land. What it has going for it are jobs, weather, and cheap housing.

Yes, cheaper housing. The average price for a home in Houston is barely above the national average. The prices for homes in those neighborhoods you just mentioned would get you a small to medium sized home in larger metros or in the Northeast corridor where a lot of people are migrating from to the sunbelt cities. So please don't underestimate the role home values have played in the sunbelts growth.

It's growth is reliant is sustained job growth,cheap housing, and improving it's infrastructure which includes providing alternative means of getting around. The more it continues to sprawl, the harder and more expensive that becomes and that includes maintenance. Cities don't grow forever. Eventually they began to slow down and stagnant and I think Houston do that long before it reaches that mark.

Last edited by Octa; 08-04-2012 at 02:54 PM..
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Old 08-04-2012, 02:41 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,658 posts, read 27,108,274 times
Reputation: 9591
Quote:
Originally Posted by HtownLove View Post
why will it happen then?
Many things can happen. Corrupt governments, lack of employment, lack of resources, not able top retain top attributes such as wealth, knowledge, talent, etc, anti-growth, and more. Dallas is actually in a solid location. It's not like it is Omaha or Kansas City. Houston's location is better. But Dallas will still grow toe to toe with Houston because it has many things going for it as well. Anything less is wishful thinking from Houstonians hoping to be the all around king of Texas. Both Houston and Dallas residents need to come to terms that a main city of the state developing isn't going to happen. Each will have the upper hand over the other in something. But not everything.
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Old 08-04-2012, 03:46 PM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,509 posts, read 28,206,148 times
Reputation: 7599
Quote:
Originally Posted by Octa View Post
I'm not talking about past growth. I'm talking about future growth. Houstons growth rate isn't sustainable at the current level because it has inadequate infrastructure, inadequate public transportation, terrible traffic, and has made inefficient use of it's land. What it has going for it are jobs, weather, and cheap housing.

Yes, cheaper housing. The average price for a home in Houston is barely above the national average. The prices for homes in those neighborhoods you just mentioned would get you a small to medium sized home in larger metros or in the Northeast corridor where a lot of people are migrating from to the sunbelt cities. So please don't underestimate the role home values have played in the sunbelts growth.

It's growth is reliant is sustained job growth,cheap housing, and improving it's infrastructure which includes providing alternative means of getting around. The more it continues to sprawl, the harder and more expensive that becomes and that includes maintenance. Cities don't grow forever. Eventually they began to slow down and stagnant and I think Houston do that long before it reaches that mark.
you still don't know what you are talking about. If you are taking the average price for a home in Houston and comparing it to a city elsewhere instead of comparing the price in the city versus a far out city then what can you draw from that. If a home is cheap inside the city then why not move there? That just show that they are not moving to the Woodlands for cheap housing because for the zillionth time a home in the Woodlands, or Cinco etc is NOT cheaper than one closer to town.

get it threw your skull, the people moving to the far out burbs are not chasing cheaper houses, these houses are in fact more expensive.

and again, the development is in clusters around a job market. Those job markets are self sustaining. you do not have to drive to downtown so your statement about the sprawl making things unsustainable is INVALID. If I eat, work, sleep, etc etc in the Woodlands, what stress am I putting on the rest of the metro.

I don't think you know much about these areas you are talking about? I bet you are imagining the mayor of Houston paving roads for 200 miles in each direction. Lol, the areas are independent of each other and connected by commuter interaction between business areas, not from everyone on the fringe traveling to the core at 9am. Stop going off by what cracked up urban planners are telling you. Places like LA and Houston have multiple employment districts where the jobs are concentrated instead of one. I think Houston has 13, LA has about 17. Stress is placed on multiple areas instead of one. Its hard for cost of business to ever get overpriced here because all the commercial activity is not in one location. Go read up on how Sunbelt metros function and stop acting like you know what you are talking about.
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Old 08-04-2012, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Nob Hill, San Francisco, CA
2,346 posts, read 3,387,620 times
Reputation: 1080
I think by 2050 half of them will be megacities. Even with growth slowing down, 3M is literally nothing for places that are in their prime right now. The OP left out the largest in the south, DC because they will likely be the first to cross that line. If growth slows after the next census then the Texas two will be just 1.5M-2M away from the 10M line and for 30 years that's nothing to worry about even with very slow growth.

1. Dallas 12M
2. Houston 11M-12M
3. DC 11M
4. Atlanta 8M-9M
5. Miami 8M
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Old 08-04-2012, 04:52 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,235,722 times
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They already are megacities.
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Old 08-04-2012, 05:01 PM
 
1,356 posts, read 1,638,531 times
Reputation: 1035
Quote:
Originally Posted by HtownLove View Post
If you are taking the average price for a home in Houston and comparing it to a city elsewhere instead of comparing the price in the city versus a far out city then what can you draw from that. If a home is cheap inside the city then why not move there? That just show that they are not moving to the Woodlands for cheap housing because for the zillionth time a home in the Woodlands, or Cinco etc is NOT cheaper than one closer to town.

I'm comparing it city by city. Homes in sunbelt cities are cheaper than homes in older cities. Homes in Houston are cheaper than homes in older cities. It's not a coincidence that these cities essentially exploded overnight. They had the two key ingredients to make them attractive: cheap housing and jobs.

The average price in Houston(the entire metro) is in the 160k range . In older metros, it's twice that and beyond.



Quote:
and again, the development is in clusters around a job market. Those job markets are self sustaining. you do not have to drive to downtown so your statement about the sprawl making things unsustainable is INVALID. If I eat, work, sleep, etc etc in the Woodlands, what stress am I putting on the rest of the metro.

I bet you are imagining the mayor of Houston paving roads for 200 miles in each direction. Lol, the areas are independent of each other and connected by commuter interaction between business areas, not from everyone on the fringe traveling to the core at 9am. Stop going off by what cracked up urban planners are telling you. Places like LA and Houston have multiple employment districts where the jobs are concentrated instead of one. I think Houston has 13, LA has about 17. Stress is placed on multiple areas instead of one. Its hard for cost of business to ever get overpriced here because all the commercial activity is not in one location.
1) No I don't think that's what happens, because that's not what happens. If you can't comprehend what I mean about sprawl then I'm not going to give you a write up about it. Your tone indicates you're not even remotely interested in discussing it because you're only concerned about one thing. And I've been to Houston on multiple occasions. Outside of it being a horror movie in planning, the fact that it has some of the worst traffic I've ever been in without any alternative means of getting around indicates to me that millions of people daily are putting stress on the metro. And there was also a tacky little auto shop sitting right in the middle of a residential neighborhood.

2) Multiple employment districts as you like to call them aren't exclusive to sunbelt cities. Every city has them. Urban areas aren't just made up of a long contiguous line of office buildings like some people believe(see the DC outer boroughs I posted earlier). Proper districting and zoning(something sunbelt cities lack) helps with this as well prevents it from sprawling out.


And I don't know you think pouting and throwing out little insults is somehow going to make you say any better, but cut it out. Not only is it immature, but it's annoying. I'm probably not going to continue going back and forth since it's not productive.
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Old 08-04-2012, 06:43 PM
 
Location: Atlanta & NYC
6,620 posts, read 11,692,352 times
Reputation: 6603
None.
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