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Old 08-06-2012, 05:44 PM
 
1,604 posts, read 3,502,177 times
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The fact that the OP is seeing through the BS many people try to push that places like SF and Manhattan are "heterogeneous utopias" actually makes his question that more credible. The real truth is that Manhattan and SF are perfect for white yuppies who want to feel better about themselves living in a "multicultural" area.

Truth be told, I don't think most Americans in 2012 want a heterogeneous community. We've had over five decades to make cities that are inclusive, integrated, and welcome all with open-arms, and there are only a handful of cities that fit that description. Only places I can think of are mid-major cities like Sacramento, Las Vegas, the far flung LA suburbs (Long Beach/Riverside/San Bernardino), and the East Bay area outside of Berkeley and Oakland. Note that the last two are mainly large suburbs. You can say Seattle, San Diego, Denver, Phoenix, Minneapolis, Houston, and Austin are more heterogeneous in attitude than your average American city, but even those places have neighborhoods that exclude that "one group" or events that target that "one group." As a result, this calls for further investigation into what these cities are really about.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Uptkid View Post
Washington, D.C.
You'd wish! And no, don't count the outer-beltway suburbs, since those are the only places where people don't mind being "jumbled". The city and nearby suburbs are just in transition to become an even more obnoxious version of San Francisco & Oakland, the only difference being that a river is the divider instead of the Bay, and it has more East Coast, Southern, and Midwest blowhards.

Last edited by Do a Barrel Roll; 08-06-2012 at 05:54 PM..
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Old 08-06-2012, 10:46 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,237 posts, read 19,536,382 times
Reputation: 12991
Quote:
Originally Posted by cittic10 View Post
I guess what I'm trying to say is cities that don't have specific social neighborhoods for people based on their religion, age, marital status, politics, sexual orientation, income, whether someone is white collar or blue collar, ethnicity, or what country they're from.
There isn't any large city like that in the U.S.
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Old 08-07-2012, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,509 posts, read 28,163,980 times
Reputation: 7598
Quote:
Originally Posted by cittic10 View Post
That's an oversimplification.
I'll offer Tampa, FL as an example.
And West Palm Beach, FL as another example.

At least, those are as close as I can think of to being "jumbled." It's really one of the great things about those cities. People of different cultures and backgrounds living as neighbors as opposed to be separated by the boundaries of their neighborhood.
Houston may have a Chinatown and other ethnic towns but outside of those Houston is the most integrated major City I have been to and I have been to just about every major city in the US.

Even in the ethnic ghettos the residents are diverse. There are probably more blacks and hispanics living in Chinatown than Chinese, heck there are probably more Vietnamese and Indians living in Chinatown than Chinese. The Ethnic towns is more of a business designation where a lot of those ethnic products and food are sold rather than a segregation thing.

You would be hard pressedd to find a city with more than 750K people that is more integrated than Houston
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Old 08-07-2012, 11:49 AM
 
56,582 posts, read 80,870,855 times
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This may help: CensusScope: Census Data, Charts, Maps, and Rankings

US2010

US2010

US2010
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Old 08-08-2012, 05:26 AM
 
5,691 posts, read 8,756,281 times
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I understand what the OP is looking for. It seems more likely to find ethnic/racial integration in the western cities. Finding economic integration is more difficult.

What about choosing a city you like in terms of climate, culture and job oportunities and see if you can find an ethnically & economically integrated neighborhood in that city?
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Old 08-08-2012, 06:53 AM
 
Location: Shaw.
2,226 posts, read 3,143,092 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cittic10 View Post
Thanks for playing but Manhattan would actually be a great example of the opposite of what I am looking for.
Manhattan has dozens of different neighborhoods... A neighborhood for each and every person. As a whole, the city may be very diverse however people are not jumbled up, they are in their respective neighborhoods.

Play again?
They may live in segregated communities, but where do they work/interact? Manhattan is fairly integrated during the day.

Anyway, it depends on the measure you use to determine integration. One study I saw considered an integrated block to be either 20% white or 20% black. Using that measure, the most integrated cities are:

1. Virginia Beach (41.1% of population living on integrated blocks.
2. Charlotte (31.9%)
3. Nashville (29.4%)
4. Jacksonville (28.7%)
5. St. Louis (27.2%)

Perhaps 20% isn't enough integration for you, but that's the study I have.

Study: Racial Integration in 100 Largest Metro Areas
List: Racial Integration in 100 Largest Metro Areas
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Old 08-08-2012, 09:29 AM
 
Location: ๏̯͡๏﴿ Gwinnett-That's a Civil Matter-County
2,117 posts, read 5,321,927 times
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Regarding Houston,
I've done a little reasearch into it. I was pretty sure I was going to come back with a decisive "houston, you're disqualified!"" but I'm really not able to do that just yet. Houston does clearly have some neighborhoods for people based on their religions and sexual orientation as well as.... Where do young professionals live in Houston?

but I'm still not ready to call it.

But I probably will.


Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
They may live in segregated communities, but where do they work/interact? Manhattan is fairly integrated during the day.

Anyway, it depends on the measure you use to determine integration. One study I saw considered an integrated block to be either 20% white or 20% black. Using that measure, the most integrated cities are:

1. Virginia Beach (41.1% of population living on integrated blocks.
2. Charlotte (31.9%)
3. Nashville (29.4%)
4. Jacksonville (28.7%)
5. St. Louis (27.2%)

Perhaps 20% isn't enough integration for you, but that's the study I have.

Study: Racial Integration in 100 Largest Metro Areas
List: Racial Integration in 100 Largest Metro Areas
JAcksonville?!? Jacksonville!!??
Maybe I'm not understanding that chart or maybe the city has changed in the nearly 20 years since I lived there but the place used to be racially segregated by a river. One race on one side, one race on the other side. Aside from that, it was pretty jumbled.

Quote:
Originally Posted by creeksitter View Post
What about choosing a city you like in terms of climate, culture and job oportunities and see if you can find an ethnically & economically integrated neighborhood in that city?
Because that would be easy. I'd rather find a city that was properly jumbled.

How is it that I've only lived in two states yet I can name 2 or 3, maybe 4 or 5 cities if I really tried that are jumbled yet I post this question in front of a worldwide audience and all I get is Houston, maybe Las Vegas and some other cities that are way off target. MAybe there aren't any. I guess Florida, despite all the has a pretty unique thing going with all it's jumbliness.
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Old 08-08-2012, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Austin, Texas
1,955 posts, read 2,731,544 times
Reputation: 1638
Quote:
Originally Posted by cittic10 View Post
Regarding Houston,
I've done a little reasearch into it. I was pretty sure I was going to come back with a decisive "houston, you're disqualified!"" but I'm really not able to do that just yet. Houston does clearly have some neighborhoods for people based on their religions and sexual orientation as well as.... Where do young professionals live in Houston?

but I'm still not ready to call it.

But I probably will.




JAcksonville?!? Jacksonville!!??
Maybe I'm not understanding that chart or maybe the city has changed in the nearly 20 years since I lived there but the place used to be racially segregated by a river. One race on one side, one race on the other side. Aside from that, it was pretty jumbled.



Because that would be easy. I'd rather find a city that was properly jumbled.

How is it that I've only lived in two states yet I can name 2 or 3, maybe 4 or 5 cities if I really tried that are jumbled yet I post this question in front of a worldwide audience and all I get is Houston, maybe Las Vegas and some other cities that are way off target. MAybe there aren't any. I guess Florida, despite all the has a pretty unique thing going with all it's jumbliness.
Well obviously you came and created this thread to ask others for their opinions on what cities might best fit what your extremely high standards are. If your going to start to be critical of what we try to present to help you, then you should just hang up this thread. You'll never be happy in any city if your standards are that high. Every city will have its neighborhoods that are more homogeneous. You wont find a city that is evenly jumbled up of people from everywhere and of every culture within every one of its neighborhoods.
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Old 08-08-2012, 02:51 PM
 
Location: In the heights
22,135 posts, read 23,648,900 times
Reputation: 11616
are you trying to reference the sorta flawed brookings institution paper?
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Old 08-08-2012, 03:58 PM
 
Location: not Chicagoland
1,202 posts, read 1,027,096 times
Reputation: 424
Quote:
Originally Posted by Austinite101 View Post
I feel like Manhattan is what your looking for. You see every color of every religion, of every background, and that's before you walk to the end of the block.
The City of Manhattan?
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