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Old 08-16-2012, 10:01 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,116,699 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2e1m5a View Post
Most areas have a distinct accent but it really is remarkable how quickly they change on the East Coast.

Boston's accent transitions into a New York accent which turns into a Philadelphia accent midway through New Jersey which turns into a Baltimore accent in Maryland and from there the various Southern accents kick in. About 5 really distinct accents in a span of a 8 Hour drive lol and that's not even factoring in the different accents away from the coast.
Yeah but the Boston accent doesn't transition to New York by passing through Connecticut. Connecticut people don't speak ANYTHING like NYC or Boston. They don't have any such accent.
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Old 08-17-2012, 08:51 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,231,932 times
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New Orleans. You can drive in a couple of hours from the Mississippi Coast through New Orleans into Cajun Country, and get three completely different and distinct accents.

Milwaukee also has a very distinct accent, very different from Chicago, and also very different from just a few miles into upstate Wisconsin.
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Old 08-17-2012, 11:33 AM
 
Location: One of the 13 original colonies.
10,162 posts, read 6,486,683 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
The four cities that instantly came to mind for me are Pittsburgh, Charleston, Savannah and New Orleans.

Charleston at one time had a very distinct accent from the rest of the State, but as time goes on it is dying out with the many transplants moving there. It is a shame too. I loved the old Charleston accent.
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Old 08-17-2012, 03:00 PM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,143,293 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2e1m5a View Post
Most areas have a distinct accent but it really is remarkable how quickly they change on the East Coast.

Boston's accent transitions into a New York accent which turns into a Philadelphia accent midway through New Jersey which turns into a Baltimore accent in Maryland and from there the various Southern accents kick in. About 5 really distinct accents in a span of a 8 Hour drive lol and that's not even factoring in the different accents away from the coast.
And even to a good ear there are pretty dramatic differences sometimes only a few miles apart. Northeast philly versus South Philly etc.

The Northeast has a series a fairly quickly changing accents
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Old 08-17-2012, 03:14 PM
 
6,611 posts, read 6,922,270 times
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More on the distinct Outer Banks accent of North Carolina:

"...and the distinctive Outer Banks brogue, which sounds more like an English accent than it does an American accent. Many "bankers" have often been mistaken for being from England or Ireland when traveling to areas outside of the Outer Banks. The brogue is most distinctive the further south one travels on the Outer Banks, with it being the thickest on Ocracoke Island and Harker's Island."
Outer Banks - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 08-17-2012, 03:21 PM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,488 posts, read 16,150,620 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeTarheel View Post
More on the distinct Outer Banks accent of North Carolina:

"...and the distinctive Outer Banks brogue, which sounds more like an English accent than it does an American accent. Many "bankers" have often been mistaken for being from England or Ireland when traveling to areas outside of the Outer Banks. The brogue is most distinctive the further south one travels on the Outer Banks, with it being the thickest on Ocracoke Island and Harker's Island."
Outer Banks - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"Hoy toyd on the soynd soyd!"
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Old 08-17-2012, 03:58 PM
 
5,682 posts, read 8,754,172 times
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There have been a few times I've been watching TV and heard a strangely familiar accent and it did turn out the interviewee was from Knoxville. But it may be subtle and I'm not sure outsiders could distinquish it from any other Appalachian accent.
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