U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-14-2012, 09:16 AM
Status: "Be yourself. What's the alternative?" (set 26 days ago)
 
8,736 posts, read 10,859,792 times
Reputation: 12781

Advertisements

An area you lived that something shocked the heck out of you, something you weren't expecting, an unforeseen element that you couldn't have prepared for or didn't know about an area?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-14-2012, 09:29 AM
 
Location: North West Northern Ireland.
20,695 posts, read 19,541,252 times
Reputation: 3107
When I was reading this forum and read that people in certain areas of Miami walked around in guns in broad daylight or that newyork town centre had bars across the windows in the 1980s.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2012, 02:04 PM
 
Location: New York NY
4,271 posts, read 6,358,077 times
Reputation: 9081
I was totally shocked that when I lived in Detroit in the mid-90s for a while and so many Detroiters felt that there was absolutely nothing really the matter with the place.

Seriously.

Last edited by citylove101; 08-15-2012 at 02:20 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-16-2012, 09:42 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn
40,056 posts, read 30,550,430 times
Reputation: 10490
Speaking as a New Yorker, I found the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center reasonably shocking.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-16-2012, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,336,032 times
Reputation: 36087
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred314X View Post
Speaking as a New Yorker, I found the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center reasonably shocking.
The fact that there was a terror attack was not by itself surprising nor shocking, nor even unprecedented. The fact that the buildings fell down and that they had not been evacuated quickly was a bit of a shock.

But I think the OP is asking about characteristics already present as a daily feature of a place, that seem shocking to a visitor.

I find National Parks to be shockingly ordinary, compared to the the space in between them, which is just as fascinating if you take the trouble to explore and understand it.

I once lived for two years in a dry county, and I didn't know it until I had house guests who wanted a bottle of wine with dinner, and the supermarket told us we had to drive 30 miles to buy wine. That came as a bit of a shock.

Last edited by jtur88; 08-16-2012 at 10:11 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2012, 12:15 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,211 posts, read 54,662,203 times
Reputation: 66697
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
The fact that there was a terror attack was not by itself surprising nor shocking, nor even unprecedented. The fact that the buildings fell down and that they had not been evacuated quickly was a bit of a shock..
I beg to differ that they were not evacuated quickly. Evacuation began immediately and most of it was self-evacuation. People always remember that nearly 3,000 people died but rarely remember that 15,000 of us got out safely before the buildings collapsed. The majority of the people who didn't get out simply could not because they were above the impact zones. You are correct about it not being a complete shock. They surprised us that day, yes, but if you worked there, it was always in your head that they DID say they were coming back to finish the job.


Anyway, OT, but had to make that correction.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
But I think the OP is asking about characteristics already present as a daily feature of a place, that seem shocking to a visitor.

I find National Parks to be shockingly ordinary, compared to the the space in between them, which is just as fascinating if you take the trouble to explore and understand it.

I once lived for two years in a dry county, and I didn't know it until I had house guests who wanted a bottle of wine with dinner, and the supermarket told us we had to drive 30 miles to buy wine. That came as a bit of a shock.
I was shocked that Philadelphia is as rundown and dilapidated as it is. There is a small area near where the museums and historical buildings are that is nice, and then it seems as if a large part of the rest of the city is slummy. About ten years ago, we took our Girl Scouts for an overnight at the Philadelphia Zoo (there isn't much weirder than the sounds you hear waking up at a zoo in the morning). We took a wrong turn and missed the entrance to the zoo so we had to drive down a block that is adjacent to the zoo, and the houses were all missing their windows and had siding falling off and sagging porches, and yet people were sitting on the porches so the buildings were evidently occupied. It's not that I don't know inner-city poverty exists, but usually it isn't so visible next to the tourist attractions. Perhaps it should be. But it made me think, "Gee, if they allow these conditions where outsiders come all the time to bring their children, what does the REST of the city look like?"

To be fair, I've only visited the city twice. The other time was to take my daughter and nieces to see the Liberty Bell, etc. But it was the same deal--a few blocks of a historical area, and then slum. I've heard tales of gentification, and Philly has a tourist campaign going on in the train stations of New York, so I'm wondering if things have changed and it would be worth another visit. I live somewhat closer to Philadelphia now than I used to, and I'm interested in seeing more of the historical sites on my own now that the daughter is grown and on her own.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2012, 12:24 PM
 
Location: The City
22,341 posts, read 32,192,195 times
Reputation: 7744
^^^ Sadly West Philly and North Philly have far far far too much poverty and awful living conditions. That area close to the zoo is not that great oddly enough. While there are still too many areas with such poverty that is not generally a good respresentation of the city overall (even if pretty close to the zoo) though that type of nabe is too common for a city, would agree.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2012, 12:55 PM
 
46 posts, read 64,930 times
Reputation: 85
Some things about Baltimore shocked me. The Inner Harbor area was really nice, and I loved Fell's Point. However, I visited Johns Hopkins (the medical campus) and was blown away by how dilapidated the surrounding city was. There were blocks of boarded up buildings right across from hospital buildings! I expected the area surrounding the medical center to be well-maintained and filled with professionals, kind of like how the Cleveland Clinic and University Hospitals border some nice areas (Little Italy, University Circle).

Those row houses would be amazing if people fixed them up and started living in them. You could get a SF or Boston-esque street scene if the population density went back up.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2012, 01:46 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,211 posts, read 54,662,203 times
Reputation: 66697
Another one was when visiting DC a few years ago, on Thanksgiving weekend, as it began to get dark I saw homeless men setting up for the night under the soaring white porticos of the federal buildings just off the mall.

Now I worked in New York City for years and walked past many a sleeping homeless person on the sidewalk in all seasons, but for some reason this vision of those on the lowest rung of our society choosing to sleep under the protection of these huge stone buildings in our country's capital was disturbing to see.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2012, 04:48 PM
 
3,515 posts, read 4,968,835 times
Reputation: 3499
In the 1980s I visited Philadelphia for the first time with some friends and after sightseeing downtown, I proceeded to drive us to the Strawberry Mansion Youth Hostel at Fairmont Park, at night in the dark. The most direct and sensible route on a map, appeared to be Ridge Avenue (I didn't want to use the Schuylkill Expressway). Anyhow, the neighborhood looked just like the one where Harrison Ford and the little Pennsylvania Amish boy in the movie "Witness" went into a loud ghetto bar room, chasing after his murder suspect. My friends started trembling and freaking out, and I turned into Fairmont Park and it was foggy and rainy, and I parked to look at the map again, and a policeman asked what were we doing in such a dangerous neighborhood. I told him were just following what appeared to be the most logical direct route between downtown and the Youth Hostel. He led us there, it wasn't far at all.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top