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Old 08-14-2012, 12:52 PM
 
3,234 posts, read 7,630,288 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post

Almost half of CA by area voted Republican, I was referring mainly to the Valley, obviously CA is a blue state overall.

Yes, all those cities are mostly suburban, definitely by world standards. Single detached homes dominate in every city in the US with a handful of exceptions: even Chicago is not one of them.

Still, Chicago's public transit rate is below 10%, so obviously the vast majority still like their cars. I would call that domination.

Houston's transit system? Less than 2% of people even use it regularly! That's laughable! Come back when Houston reaches 25%, let alone the 90% of cities like Hong Kong.

Again you've failed to disprove my point.
Area doesn't matter. Population does and if you look at numbers oer 60% of california voted democrat. A county with small population voting republican doesn't really add much.
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Old 08-14-2012, 12:58 PM
 
1,807 posts, read 2,533,043 times
Reputation: 1503
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post

Almost half of CA by area voted Republican, I was referring mainly to the Valley, obviously CA is a blue state overall.

Yes, all those cities are mostly suburban, definitely by world standards. Single detached homes dominate in every city in the US with a handful of exceptions: even Chicago is not one of them.

Still, Chicago's public transit rate is below 10%, so obviously the vast majority still like their cars. I would call that domination.

Houston's transit system? Less than 2% of people even use it regularly! That's laughable! Come back when Houston reaches 25%, let alone the 90% of cities like Hong Kong.

Again you've failed to disprove my point.
You realize that the blue counties are generally the most densely populated in the country, right?

So....now we are comparing cities in "Middle America" to cities around the globe? Since when does that make sense? Baltimore is suburban by your standards too, then, since it has a lower population density than, say, Paris? And since when is the housing stock an appropriate metric? You do know that much of the housing stock in Philadelphia, New York, and Boston are also detached single family units, right?

Name me one city besides New York (in the United States, since your apples-to-oranges Houston-to-Hong Kong comparison is complete, utter bull) that has a transit ridership rate above 10%. You're not going to find them on either seaboard, Trimac, so if that is your metric for distinguishing Middle America from the rest of America, than the only city you have left that's not Middle America is New York itself. In which case, your attempts to split the United States into 4 regions is rather moot, correct?

Several people have told you how categorically incorrect you are in your assertions here. You don't need to think I've dis-proven your point. One thing I've learned about you on these forums (granted, through limited interactions) is that you rather enjoy spouting off about things that you have no real-world experience with (particularly, the Midwest, Middle America, whatever it is that you're deciding to call it today). I've also learned that there's no changing your mind once you're on one of these little kicks.

If other posters care to entertain this silly argument, they may. But I'm done arguing with a brick wall.
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Old 08-14-2012, 01:17 PM
 
9,967 posts, read 14,616,838 times
Reputation: 9193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Okay tell me about the vast cultural gulf between Sacramento and Buffalo in terms of the average person then. I'm all ears.
Culturally, Buffalo is going to obviously be closer to cities of the Northeast then Sacramento. It's an old Rust-Belt city with longstanding European ethnic populations(Italians, Poles, Irish, Jews) and a large African-American population. Similar to somewhere like Philadelphia in some ways. Very old school feel in a lot of neighborhoods.

Sacramento is typical of much of California. Lots of recent Asian and Hispanic immigrants combined with urban transplants from the rest of the state and a more conservative population typical of the interior Western US on the outskirts. Once you get to the foothills(where much of my family is from) you're into more redneck country, some people's roots there go back to the Gold Rush. Sprawling Sunbelt-style neighborhoods, but also a lot of outdoors activities to the east that plays a role in the culture(Sierra skiing, river rafting and kayaking on the American River).

If you can't see the differences between these two places, you might as well claim there's no difference between New York and San Francisco.

Last edited by Deezus; 08-14-2012 at 01:28 PM..
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Old 08-14-2012, 01:19 PM
 
Location: Glendale, CA
1,298 posts, read 2,112,022 times
Reputation: 1374
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post

Almost half of CA by area voted Republican, I was referring mainly to the Valley, obviously CA is a blue state overall.

Yes, all those cities are mostly suburban, definitely by world standards. Single detached homes dominate in every city in the US with a handful of exceptions: even Chicago is not one of them.

Still, Chicago's public transit rate is below 10%, so obviously the vast majority still like their cars. I would call that domination.

Houston's transit system? Less than 2% of people even use it regularly! That's laughable! Come back when Houston reaches 25%, let alone the 90% of cities like Hong Kong.

Again you've failed to disprove my point.
So why don't you just say there are two cultures -- red counties vs. blue counties -- and be done with it?
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Old 08-14-2012, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,334 posts, read 10,309,361 times
Reputation: 5400
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Broadly speaking (I know you can break this down further), would you culturally speaking there are three 'regions' in the United States today?

1. Middle America - To me this is most of the lower 48, extending into parts of the Northeast: mostly of PA, most of upstate NY (with a few islands of NYC influence), probably the western half of Texas. The other exceptions are South Texas and the southern regions of the border states of the Southwest (the Hispanic realm). This is 'typical' America without any strong cultural regional identity.

2. The Eastern Seaboard - specifically really just eastern Pennsylvania as far as Scranton-Wilkes-Barre, NJ, MD, NOVA and arguably coastal VA. The typical 'Eastern' cultural characteristics, best represented by the urban dwellers of NYC, Philly, Boston, Baltimore.

3. The South - Includes most of the South, although Southern culture is being eroded in some of the bigger cities and college towns. The obvious exception is South Florida. SE FL is a mix of the Hispanic world and the Eastern Seaboard.

4. The Hispanic Realm - Areas where Spanish is commonly spoken, including Southeastern California, parts of LA County, San Bernardino County etc, much of southern AZ, most of NM and western and southern Texas.


The southern portion of Louisiana is very distinct but I would still consider it a sub-type of the 'Southern' region, if one has to divide the States into the 4 meta-regions.
I dare you to tell the people of western PA and Pittsburgh that they have no strong cultural regional identity.
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Old 08-14-2012, 02:54 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,334 posts, read 10,309,361 times
Reputation: 5400
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
LOL...and most of you in Mickey Mouse land think that going to Louisiana is like visiting another country.

Should have put a smiley face after that one since I know you are joking and don't think that poorly of Americans.
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Old 08-14-2012, 05:55 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,384,878 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by garmin239 View Post
Area doesn't matter. Population does and if you look at numbers oer 60% of california voted democrat. A county with small population voting republican doesn't really add much.
My point was that much of CA by area does vote Republican: the map proved my point, that's all I was trying to say. I defined the regions geographically not by population.
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Old 08-14-2012, 05:57 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,384,878 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by srsmn View Post
You realize that the blue counties are generally the most densely populated in the country, right?

So....now we are comparing cities in "Middle America" to cities around the globe? Since when does that make sense? Baltimore is suburban by your standards too, then, since it has a lower population density than, say, Paris? And since when is the housing stock an appropriate metric? You do know that much of the housing stock in Philadelphia, New York, and Boston are also detached single family units, right?

Name me one city besides New York (in the United States, since your apples-to-oranges Houston-to-Hong Kong comparison is complete, utter bull) that has a transit ridership rate above 10%. You're not going to find them on either seaboard, Trimac, so if that is your metric for distinguishing Middle America from the rest of America, than the only city you have left that's not Middle America is New York itself. In which case, your attempts to split the United States into 4 regions is rather moot, correct?

Several people have told you how categorically incorrect you are in your assertions here. You don't need to think I've dis-proven your point. One thing I've learned about you on these forums (granted, through limited interactions) is that you rather enjoy spouting off about things that you have no real-world experience with (particularly, the Midwest, Middle America, whatever it is that you're deciding to call it today). I've also learned that there's no changing your mind once you're on one of these little kicks.

If other posters care to entertain this silly argument, they may. But I'm done arguing with a brick wall.
You were denying those Midwestern cities were even suburban, when even by AMERICAN standards they clearly are. Chicagoland is a huge sprawl, still. Most of the world defines cities by metro area by the way. I don't know why, since they're clearly the most heartland parts of America you can get.

Yes transit isn't even that relevant: although Boston clearly is more transit-orientated than Phoenix or Columbus, Ohio.

Nothing I've stated is factually incorrect. It's a matter of subjective opinion, but it just seems folks like to split hairs. Not saying you can't disagree, of course, but it's just your reasoning which seems peculiar to me.
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Old 08-14-2012, 06:00 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,384,878 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
Culturally, Buffalo is going to obviously be closer to cities of the Northeast then Sacramento. It's an old Rust-Belt city with longstanding European ethnic populations(Italians, Poles, Irish, Jews) and a large African-American population. Similar to somewhere like Philadelphia in some ways. Very old school feel in a lot of neighborhoods.

Sacramento is typical of much of California. Lots of recent Asian and Hispanic immigrants combined with urban transplants from the rest of the state and a more conservative population typical of the interior Western US on the outskirts. Once you get to the foothills(where much of my family is from) you're into more redneck country, some people's roots there go back to the Gold Rush. Sprawling Sunbelt-style neighborhoods, but also a lot of outdoors activities to the east that plays a role in the culture(Sierra skiing, river rafting and kayaking on the American River).

If you can't see the differences between these two places, you might as well claim there's no difference between New York and San Francisco.
Well I could point out the demographic differences between Buffalo, Syracuse and Albany...yes there are minor differences between Buffalo and Sacramento, but fundamentally I think they're roughly both pretty typically American. If you disagree that's fine.
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Old 08-14-2012, 06:01 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,384,878 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
Should have put a smiley face after that one since I know you are joking and don't think that poorly of Americans.
Yes, all in jest.
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