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Old 08-14-2012, 06:18 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,723,856 times
Reputation: 9029

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Quote:
Originally Posted by srsmn View Post
Our little Australian friend needs to visit a few more than 16 states plus-- gasp!-- New York City (the epitome of a middle-American experience...) before he or she starts any more threads.

In the meantime, Trimac, please go back to throwing boomerangs and saving your baby from hungry dingos.
Why are we being so harsh to someone who isnt even living in the same continent as us? Our little Australian friend is just curious and asking us a question and sharing his opinion and experiences from his travels.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
LOL...and most of you in Mickey Mouse land think that going to Louisiana is like visiting another country.
That would be Miami
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Old 08-14-2012, 06:20 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,412,919 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobMarley_1LOVE View Post
Why are we being so harsh to someone who isnt even living in the same continent as us? Our little Australian friend is just curious and asking us a question and sharing his opinion and experiences from his travels.



That would be Miami
Yeah I guess that's why I'm asking these questions in the first place lol.
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Old 08-14-2012, 06:47 PM
 
Location: WASHINGTON, D.C.
163 posts, read 196,909 times
Reputation: 61
DC is in the eastern seaboard category, you forgot to mention it tho....
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Old 08-14-2012, 06:52 PM
 
733 posts, read 854,216 times
Reputation: 1563
IMO America can be divided in two_ urban or rural

so in some way the OP is not that far off the mark
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Old 08-14-2012, 06:53 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,412,919 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uptkid View Post
DC is in the eastern seaboard category, you forgot to mention it tho....
Yes I agree it is, although it still retains faint Southernisms.
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Old 08-14-2012, 06:54 PM
 
1,807 posts, read 2,534,101 times
Reputation: 1503
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
You were denying those Midwestern cities were even suburban, when even by AMERICAN standards they clearly are. Chicagoland is a huge sprawl, still. Most of the world defines cities by metro area by the way. I don't know why, since they're clearly the most heartland parts of America you can get.

Yes transit isn't even that relevant: although Boston clearly is more transit-orientated than Phoenix or Columbus, Ohio.

Nothing I've stated is factually incorrect. It's a matter of subjective opinion, but it just seems folks like to split hairs. Not saying you can't disagree, of course, but it's just your reasoning which seems peculiar to me.
The suburbs are suburban by definition. The cities aren't. That's true everywhere in the US, though. Miami? Charlotte? "Sprawltimore"? Some metropolitan areas are denser than others, regardless of where they are in the country. I hardly think the fact that Chicagoland is massive in area qualifies the entirety of "Middle America" as being "suburban" or "car obsessed." Everything on the lakefront in Chicago is as structurally dense as anything you'll find anywhere else in the country (again, besides some parts of NYC, which is a different beast). And that's just one of many examples from "Middle America." Joliet is not very dense. Neither is Bethesda. Neither is Worcester. Neither is Staten Island. Get it yet?

Yes, Boston is more transit oriented than Columbus. What is your point? Cleveland is more transit oriented than Raleigh. See what I did there?

We're not splitting hairs. You're making generalizations. We are trying to hone in on the generalizations, and give you a more accurate picture of the part of the country you are posting specifically about (again, without ever even actually BEEN THERE). Take and do with that knowledge what you will
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Old 08-14-2012, 06:55 PM
 
1,807 posts, read 2,534,101 times
Reputation: 1503
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobMarley_1LOVE View Post
Why are we being so harsh to someone who isnt even living in the same continent as us? Our little Australian friend is just curious and asking us a question and sharing his opinion and experiences from his travels.



That would be Miami
Sorry, man, I don't buy it. It's one thing to ask the questions and get the answers. It's another to ask the questions, get the answers, then point a finger and scream "You're wrong!" so loud the whole room can hear. And about a place that we actually live in, no less....
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Old 08-14-2012, 06:57 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,412,919 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by srsmn View Post
The suburbs are suburban by definition. The cities aren't. That's true everywhere in the US, though. Miami? Charlotte? "Sprawltimore"? Some metropolitan areas are denser than others, regardless of where they are in the country. I hardly think the fact that Chicagoland is massive in area qualifies the entirety of "Middle America" as being "suburban" or "car obsessed." Everything on the lakefront in Chicago is as structurally dense as anything you'll find anywhere else in the country (again, besides some parts of NYC, which is a different beast). And that's just one of many examples from "Middle America." Joliet is not very dense. Neither is Bethesda. Neither is Worcester. Neither is Staten Island. Get it yet?

Yes, Boston is more transit oriented than Columbus. What is your point? Cleveland is more transit oriented than Raleigh. See what I did there?

We're not splitting hairs. You're making generalizations. We are trying to hone in on the generalizations, and give you a more accurate picture of the part of the country you are posting specifically about (again, without ever even actually BEEN THERE). Take and do with that knowledge what you will
Many parts of the cities in the US are really suburban in character: larger lots with single houses, big backyards, wide avenues, that sort of thing. Suburbs no different to the technical 'suburbs'. Jacksonville is a perfect example of this. Yes, despite it's inner city urbanity most of Chicago is suburban in character in the typical American manner. Either way, even if Chicago was an exception that doesn't negate my argument that the Midwest is a region i would define as 'Middle America' being pretty much American, the regular version.
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Old 08-14-2012, 07:02 PM
 
1,807 posts, read 2,534,101 times
Reputation: 1503
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
I dare you to tell the people of western PA and Pittsburgh that they have no strong cultural regional identity.
Right on. I live in Pittsburgh now. Anybody who would group Pittsburgh in with Minneapolis in terms of culture clearly doesn't know much about both. The similarities pretty much end with the Philip Johnson skyscrapers...
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Old 08-14-2012, 07:03 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,412,919 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by srsmn View Post
Right on. I live in Pittsburgh now. Anybody who would group Pittsburgh in with Minneapolis in terms of culture clearly doesn't know much about both. The similarities pretty much end with the Philip Johnson skyscrapers...
I said 'broad regions', obviously you can slice an orange any number of ways, but I was going for the most simplistic, elemental division.
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