U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-15-2012, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,350,414 times
Reputation: 4270

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by JJG View Post
Of course not.
Of course!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-15-2012, 02:04 PM
JJG
 
Location: Fort Worth
13,250 posts, read 19,240,598 times
Reputation: 7010
Anyway, to the OP.... specifically, are you just talking about ignored cities on this site or just in general?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2012, 02:16 PM
 
5,767 posts, read 10,325,846 times
Reputation: 3813
If we include metro areas as a whole, then there are some places like Grand Rapids, Fresno, Albany (New York), and Dayton which are usually overlooked. I'd say that the Greenville-Spartanburg area of South Carolina gets overshadowed by Charleston and Columbia, even though it is the biggest metro area in SC by a large margin.

I'd also say that the south Texas border region is largely overlooked on here. The McAllen-Harlingen area, along with Brownsville. That area continues to grow rapidly, but it's usually overlooked even within Texas itself. McAllen might be the most "anonymous" metro area of its size in the country; I'd bet that most people around the country have simply never heard of it.

Also, Bakersfield (California) is quite a bit larger than many people assume (its Census MSA is over 850,000 people), but it doesn't usually come up in discussions of California, or southern California in particular.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2012, 02:21 PM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,509 posts, read 28,255,230 times
Reputation: 7599
Quote:
Originally Posted by tablemtn View Post
I'd also say that the south Texas border region is largely overlooked on here. The McAllen-Harlingen area, along with Brownsville. That area continues to grow rapidly, but it's usually overlooked even within Texas itself. McAllen might be the most "anonymous" metro area of its size in the country; I'd bet that most people around the country have simply never heard of it.
McAllen is huge because of the border crossings. Just because it has a lot of people does not mean we should be talking about it strengths because what exactly are its strengths? It has a lot of people and that is that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2012, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,157 posts, read 19,851,977 times
Reputation: 8825
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pimpy View Post
How about Fort Lauderdale or West Palm Beach? People lump them in with Miami, but both FTL (MSA pop 1.7 mil) and WPB (MSA pop 1.4 mil) are decently large metro areas in and of themselves, and each has their own unique vibe and culture. Skylines are underrated as well.
Since when did Ft. Lauderdale have it's own metro area? It's part of South Florida Metro.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2012, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,157 posts, read 19,851,977 times
Reputation: 8825
Quote:
Originally Posted by HtownLove View Post
Was going to make a case for Detroit earlier but abandoned it.

People are quick to point out the bad, but Detroit's good is often overlooked.

I never hear Detroit mentioned in Music discussions, in travel discussions, food, skyline, etc etc
If you never hear Detroit mentioned in music discussions then you must be pretty young.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2012, 02:47 PM
 
260 posts, read 670,204 times
Reputation: 197
I always thought Baltimore often gets ignored
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2012, 02:55 PM
 
1,000 posts, read 1,510,134 times
Reputation: 729
Quote:
Originally Posted by HtownLove View Post
You can't be more wrong.

Dallas survived because of FW and the other cities in Texas and the surrounding states.

FW's cattle industry fed Dallas shipping industry. SA's cotton industry did the same. Houston's port did the Same. None of the other cities really need Dallas, but Dallas's existent depended on the Industries of its neighbors.


As for the the rivalry, the FW- Dallas one is just as intense as the ST Paul- Minneapolis one. There is lots of name calling and looking down upon in DFW.
"Name calling" and "looking down upon" is one thing, but that was nothing back when Minneapolis and St. Paul had their real rivalry going on. When one city built a building, the other builds one taller. When one city finishes a Cathedral, the other builds a basilica right afterwards. St. Paul is farther downriver, so they were stealing most of the river industry and barge traffic from Minneapolis. They used to both be a similar size, and during one Census, each city organized the arresting or kidnapping of the other city's census taker. At one point, the two cities couldnt agree on Daylight Savings Time, so St. Paul was an hour behind Minneapolis, so the time switched every time you crossed the border. People would never visit the other city. People from Minneapolis would get in violent fights with People from St. Paul. Both competed for major league teams and stadiums. That, my friend, is rivalry.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2012, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,680 posts, read 27,171,656 times
Reputation: 9612
Quote:
Originally Posted by HtownLove View Post
Just like FW would have been in line with OKC without Dallas, Dallas would also be in line with OKC without FC. It goes both ways
I'm sorry but I just 100% disagree with this. They aren't twin cities at the slightest. Dallas was growing long before Fort Worth or even the Fort Worth side was growing. Dallas was the social and economic powerhouse for the region long before FW started seeing it's greatest growth and that's only within the past 20 years. Dallas was bound to become what it was because of it's strategic location on railroads, airhubs (Love would have definitely been a successful airport on it's own), and its can-do attitude. I mean Dallas in 1940 grew from a city of 294k to a city of 904k in 40 years. FW in that same time period grew from a city of 177k to a city of 385k. It even lost population in the 70s. Hardly twin cities.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2012, 03:32 PM
 
Location: Old Hyde Park, Kansas City,MO
1,145 posts, read 2,085,102 times
Reputation: 565
Virgina Beach is another area that is always ignored. You never hear about anything coming out of this area. I can't even think of any big businesses HQ here except for the big Navy Ship Building yards.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top