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Old 08-21-2012, 09:16 AM
 
29,905 posts, read 27,345,109 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
You don't give Arkansas enough credit. Little Rock and Fayetteville alone show promise for the state. It's below the radar.
Yeah, I was going to say that NW Arkansas in particular is really shaping up pretty nicely these days and has been making lots of noise for itself. Plus Arkansas has more F500 headquarters (four) than either Alabama (one) or Mississippi (none), including that of the world's largest retailer. Little Rock also seems to be a gem of a midsize city with much going for it.
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Old 08-21-2012, 10:11 AM
 
10,509 posts, read 8,425,023 times
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Posts here fall into two categories. Some view desirable "progress" as urban growth, industry, intensive development of cities and suburbs - while others view retaining and honoring - and even promoting - the best of the traditional past of our region as opposed to generic "development" as more valuable.

I fall into the latter category, and regret that some can only see "progress" as the destruction and devaluation of cultural and tangible traditions, as they are shoved aside by ill-considered changes of the kind which destroy landscapes, significant structures, and ultimately, not only quality of life but a way of life in favor of flavorless, generic, cheaply envisioned and cheaply realized "development" for personal gain. I don't want this for Kentucky, and I don't want it for the South in general. Improvements, yes, of course - I would be foolish to deny they are needed, notably in education, infrastructure, clean industry, etc.

But not at the cost of what makes our region unique and beautiful.
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Old 08-21-2012, 05:35 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,752,834 times
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Growth doesn't have to be detrimental to culture. Blame city and county leaders for allowing the sprawl to develop. Also the citizens for not opposing what ruins the culture in your respective areas. It happens here, but someplaces have plans in place to reverse or stop it.
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Old 08-23-2012, 03:07 AM
 
6,272 posts, read 10,021,726 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
Posts here fall into two categories. Some view desirable "progress" as urban growth, industry, intensive development of cities and suburbs - while others view retaining and honoring - and even promoting - the best of the traditional past of our region as opposed to generic "development" as more valuable.

I fall into the latter category, and regret that some can only see "progress" as the destruction and devaluation of cultural and tangible traditions, as they are shoved aside by ill-considered changes of the kind which destroy landscapes, significant structures, and ultimately, not only quality of life but a way of life in favor of flavorless, generic, cheaply envisioned and cheaply realized "development" for personal gain. I don't want this for Kentucky, and I don't want it for the South in general. Improvements, yes, of course - I would be foolish to deny they are needed, notably in education, infrastructure, clean industry, etc.

But not at the cost of what makes our region unique and beautiful.
Many of the so called "New South" states have the same natural beauty that you speak of (some of them have more of it). Take it from someone who has lived in Appalachia for example. You can't tell the difference between NC, Tenn, VA, WV, and Eastern KY. If someone dropped you off by helicopter (while blindfolded) in the middle of the Appalachian areas of any of those states, you would not be able to know for sure which state you were in once you removed your blindfold. So to me, the whole "natural beauty" argument is something that every city, every state, every region, and every planet in this solar system can make. In other words, there's nothing unique about natural beauty. This "ball of dirt and water" that we're spinning on has plenty of it.

If anything, it can be argued that the most popular "New South" states are popular because they have a larger variety of both natural and man-made beauty. Just Florida alone has PLENTY of coastline as well as world class metros with world class entertainment. Georgia has ATL (HELLO) as well as mountains, beaches, and historic Savannah. NC/SC has historic cities, fast growing mid-sized cities (which are transplant magnets), charming coastal communities, and ski resorts.

As for the comments about "developments", in most cases the "New South" states have contained most of their growth around fewer than a handful of cities (which actually protects quite a bit of open space). In the case of NC, 20% of the state's entire population resides in only 2 counties (there are 98 other counties in the state). Take away those two largest counties and NC is a fairly "wide open" state.

Lastly, I know folks on the forums who would turn flips down their cities' "Main Streets" if a little bit of the New South phenomenon came crashing into the likes of Birmingham and Jackson. There are folks from those areas now living in New South states because they simply got tired of waiting for their states to "step up".
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Old 08-23-2012, 03:29 AM
 
Location: Closer than you think!
2,145 posts, read 3,319,382 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by srsmn View Post
I agree with you on the first part, but I gotta tell you, lifelong Northerner and I've never heard anybody make a distinction. If people are dumb enough to stereotype the South, they're dumb enough to lump it all together. Honestly, Georgia (outside of maybe Atlanta) doesn't have any more positive public face with most people than Mississippi...

That's far from the truth. Georgia has Savannah and there's nothing in Mississippi comes close. There are also several other cities such as Augusta, Columbus and Athens that has a pretty good image as well. Mississippi has one mid size city in Jackson in which you couldn't pay 99% of the country to live there and the rest of Mississippi is pretty much rural and poverty-stricken!

Mississippi damaged its image awhile ago and it's probably the worst state in the nation to be honest. Out of all of the states that were mentioned, Mississippi is clearly at the bottom of the south in a tier of it's own. As a southerner, I wouldn't even group Alabama and Arkansas with it because it's a shameful place IMO!
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Old 08-23-2012, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,713 posts, read 36,132,256 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
Anything to pay the bills. Don't have a career yet.

Thanks.
You pay for that cheap housing too. I couldn't fathom living in West Virginia. I would love the views and scenery there but too boring for me.
I honestly don't think I've ever been bored - I can always - ALWAYS find something to do!

But I'm a military brat and former military wife. I can make my home anywhere and be happy and contented.

Just about every place in the US has it's charm -but I greatly prefer the South.
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Old 08-23-2012, 07:54 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,713 posts, read 36,132,256 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
I have many Virginians as friends who feel the same way. Virginia is one of our most important, historic, scenic and "Southern" Southern states, yet most of the nation simply associates it with DC. Of course, the same could be said to some degree about Atlanta and Georgia, Miami and Florida, Charlotte and North Carolina, the Texas metropli and Texas -- that the reputations and influence of the major metros overshadow or deminish the "native" feel and traditions of the rest of the state. But at least in all those other examples, there remains decidedly native elements that define the soul of a place. Not so in NOVA. There's nothing at all resembling tradional Virginia left.
I just got back from Virginia (the Tidewater region) and while I agree that the urban sprawl and traffic is terrible, there are still little hamlets and gentle, lazy places that feel quiet and Southern and deeply historical to me. For instance, all around Yorktown there are little winding roads and fields and older, quiet tucked away neighborhoods. You can't get much more Southern and historical than THAT area.

Even though I've lived in that area before, for some reason I had never been to Moore House till last week. I LOVED IT. I couldn't believe that it is free - that you can just walk in and walk around the house where Cornwallis surrendered.

That Historic Triangle is hard to beat and I am so glad that the state of Virginia decided to protect that area so well.

If you get off the main interstates and highways, even in the coastal area of Virginia, Olde Virginia and the historic South is right at your fingertips. And the further west you drive, the more rural and Southern it feels - and history just around every corner.

I love it there - it's still my favorite state.
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Old 08-23-2012, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,713 posts, read 36,132,256 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
You don't give Arkansas enough credit. Little Rock and Fayetteville alone show promise for the state. It's below the radar.
I agree with you.

Arkansas is full of people who specifically DO NOT WANT urban sprawl. They love the rural aspects of their state.

Also, Arkansas is a GREAT place to retire - with low real estate prices, lots of very scenic areas (especially the west side of the state, with the beautiful and gently rolling Ozarks), and very low property taxes.

Not many people have heard about Hot Springs Village, about thirty miles outside of Hot Springs (which is a very nice and pretty cosmopolitan place in it's own right). Hot Springs Village is a retirement community that it ranked #7 out of 50 such communities in the US. It has a population INSIDE THE GATES of over 16,000. It is completely gated, with five locked gates and very controlled access. It has 12 lakes, 9 golf courses, 20 churches, a large civic theater, 5 "commerce centers" (areas of shops with banks, restaurants, hardware stores, etc) a state of the art and very large fitness center, three large outdoor pools, over 24 miles of walking trails, about 20 restaurants, and housing ranging from condos at $60,000, bungalows on very private lots at about $120,000 up to $5,000,000 homes. The amenities are amazing, the terrain of the area is slightly mountainous and very scenic, the air is very clean, Hot Springs with lots of good shopping is less than thirty minutes away, and Little Rock is less than an hour away. Memphis is about 2 hours away.

My parents are moving up there. They are typical of the sort of people who move there - comfortable retirees, with lots of active years ahead of them, well educated, well traveled, and very energetic. They do NOT want more "progress" and more industry in that area! By the way, that whole area is inhabited by people from all over the US, who have moved there specifically to AVOID urban areas.

I think a lot of Arkansans feel the same way. And if that's so , more power to 'em. They live in a beautiful state and I hope they keep it that way.
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Old 08-23-2012, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,713 posts, read 36,132,256 times
Reputation: 63310
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ark90 View Post
Why are big cities and lots of people moving here good? Do professional sports teams and a Starbucks on every block signify that a place finally has value? Why do we have to assimilate into this plastic consumer culture? Get rid of our own culture so we can talk and dress the same and have the same music as everywhere else? All so Northerners will stop making fun of us? Is that it? Because I really don't care what other people think about my state. I'll take the Ozark mountains over some circus like Atlanta any day. Cutting down the trees and forests to build a big, boring suburban sprawl identical to anywhere else in the country isn't appealing to me. I would rather see Arkansas with its natural beauty in tact for the next fifty years than seeing it turn into a a giant retirement home for rich Yankees (which parts of Arkansas already are) like Florida or some of the other states mentioned.
I think that most retirees who move the Arkansas are moving there specifically to AVOID urban sprawl. Let's hope so.
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Old 08-23-2012, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Northwest Hills, CT
352 posts, read 631,971 times
Reputation: 239
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdw1084 View Post
That's far from the truth. Georgia has Savannah and there's nothing in Mississippi comes close. There are also several other cities such as Augusta, Columbus and Athens that has a pretty good image as well. Mississippi has one mid size city in Jackson in which you couldn't pay 99% of the country to live there and the rest of Mississippi is pretty much rural and poverty-stricken!

Mississippi damaged its image awhile ago and it's probably the worst state in the nation to be honest. Out of all of the states that were mentioned, Mississippi is clearly at the bottom of the south in a tier of it's own. As a southerner, I wouldn't even group Alabama and Arkansas with it because it's a shameful place IMO!

Mississippi is not THAT bad, geez.
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